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Roberto Alomar

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By Matt Vensel | May 1, 2013
A couple of hours after it was announced that Roberto Alomar would be inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame, the former Orioles second baseman hopped on a conference call at noon Wednesday to talk about the honor. I was curious to see what he had to say about this current bunch of Orioles, who are third in the American League East this season and who in 2012 made the playoffs for the first time since 1997, the second of Alomar's seasons here. Alomar says he pays attention to every Major League Baseball team because he currently works as a special advisor for the Toronto Blue Jays, but he does try to keep tabs on the teams that he used to play for, including the Orioles.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
NEW YORK -- Nelson Cruz has taken a sizable lead in the American League All-Star voting for designated hitters, now outpacing the Boston Red Sox's David Ortiz, 2,457,349 to 1,652,470. According to Major League Baseball, which announced the most recent AL tallies Sunday night, the only AL players with more votes than Cruz are Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista (3,665,208), Los Angeles Angels outfielder Mike Trout (3,286,511) and Detroit Tigers first baseman Miguel Cabrera (2,645,000)
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By Sports Digest | August 5, 2010
The wife of retired Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar has obtained a temporary injunction against him after a domestic dispute over the weekend. Maria Del Pilar Alomar , 33, said in a complaint filed Monday that the couple got into an argument at their Hillsborough County, Fla., home on Sunday. Deputies responded, and the wife told them that she had to push Alomar away when he got several inches from her. No arrests were made. The complaint also described an incident in June, in which Alomar, 42, allegedly yelled at his wife and pushed her. In April, he threatened her with a knife, according to the complaint.
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By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Despite his status as a special assistant to the division-rival Toronto Blue Jays and only a short - yet decorated - tenure in Baltimore, Roberto Alomar called his induction into the Orioles Hall of Fame on Friday “a dream come true.” “I feel honored. It's an honor as a ballplayer,” Alomar said. “I never expected this phone call from the Orioles. I only played here for three years and it caught me by surprise. But to be selected by such a great, elite group of players, it is an honor.
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By Dan Connolly and Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Former second baseman Roberto Alomar isn't positive that 1996 was his greatest season as a big leaguer, but he knows that first year as an Oriole had to be among the highlights of his Hall of Fame career. “Numbers-wise, I can maybe say yes, but I had some great numbers, too, with the Cleveland Indians. But I think I had a great year,” said Alomar, who in 1996 hit .328 with 22 homers, 17 steals and a franchise record 132 runs scored. “I was doing everything that I could to bring a championship to the city of Baltimore.
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By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Despite his status as a special assistant to the division-rival Toronto Blue Jays and only a short - yet decorated - tenure in Baltimore, Roberto Alomar called his induction into the Orioles Hall of Fame on Friday “a dream come true.” “I feel honored. It's an honor as a ballplayer,” Alomar said. “I never expected this phone call from the Orioles. I only played here for three years and it caught me by surprise. But to be selected by such a great, elite group of players, it is an honor.
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By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1996
He walked the halls of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center a hero.Children waited nervously by his side, hoping for conversation with the All-Star. The man wearing the black No. 12 Orioles jersey beamed throughout the day, and spoke softly with the kids as he signed photos and posters. Parents thanked him for coming.The man they thanked was Roberto Alomar, the same player now infamous for spitting at an umpire after being ejected from a game in late September.Alomar returned to Baltimore earlier this week to visit the hospital with third baseman/outfielder B. J. Surhoff and coach Elrod Hendricks and was applauded loudly Tuesday night at Pam Shriver's charity tennis event at the Baltimore Arena.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
Pat Gillick arrived in town less than a month ago with a major-league reputation and -- by most accounts -- a magic touch. He was the architect of the Toronto Blue Jays dynasty and had come to Baltimore to build the Orioles back into the franchise that once dominated the American League.He may already have succeeded.The Orioles signed Gold Glove second baseman Roberto Alomar to a three-year, $18 million contract yesterday, adding a six-time All-Star to a team that has become the American League East favorite almost overnight.
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By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
The pairing of greatness is nothing new in this culture, but that hardly dulls the fascination for it. Fred Astaire danced alongside Gene Kelly, Paul Newman rode with Robert Redford, and Batman and Superman fought criminals together on Saturday mornings. What possibilities, with such talents merged.Greatness comes together at Camden Yards this season. Cal Ripken, baseball's pre-eminent icon for his consecutive-games streak, will play with Roberto Alomar, an original in this sport because of the graceful and imaginative manner in which he plays defense.
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By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | October 27, 1999
The start of the Sept. 5 game between the Orioles and Cleveland Indians was delayed 89 minutes by rain. Denise Hirschbeck and her three children rode down an elevator to the sub-concourse level at Camden Yards, in search of her husband, John, and a new family friend, Indians second baseman Roberto Alomar.John Hirschbeck was in the umpires' room, waiting out the delay. His wife and children were visiting from Poland, Ohio. He led them to a hallway outside the visitors' clubhouse, and asked an Indians player to summon Alomar.
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By Matt Vensel | May 1, 2013
A couple of hours after it was announced that Roberto Alomar would be inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame, the former Orioles second baseman hopped on a conference call at noon Wednesday to talk about the honor. I was curious to see what he had to say about this current bunch of Orioles, who are third in the American League East this season and who in 2012 made the playoffs for the first time since 1997, the second of Alomar's seasons here. Alomar says he pays attention to every Major League Baseball team because he currently works as a special advisor for the Toronto Blue Jays, but he does try to keep tabs on the teams that he used to play for, including the Orioles.
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By Dan Connolly and Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Former second baseman Roberto Alomar isn't positive that 1996 was his greatest season as a big leaguer, but he knows that first year as an Oriole had to be among the highlights of his Hall of Fame career. “Numbers-wise, I can maybe say yes, but I had some great numbers, too, with the Cleveland Indians. But I think I had a great year,” said Alomar, who in 1996 hit .328 with 22 homers, 17 steals and a franchise record 132 runs scored. “I was doing everything that I could to bring a championship to the city of Baltimore.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Sept. 24, 2000: Rookie running back Jamal Lewis scores his first NFL touchdown and the Ravens defense holds Cincinnati to 4 rushing yards as Baltimore crushes the visiting Bengals, 37-0. "We set a standard with this game," defensive tackle Tony Siragusa said of the Ravens' second shutout. They'll finish with four - and the Super Bowl trophy. Sept. 27, 1996: Called out on strikes in Toronto, the Orioles' Roberto Alomar spits in umpire John Hirschbeck's face and is slapped with a five-game suspension.
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By Chris Branch, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
The names Roberto Alomar and Pat Gillick conjure memories of the last good days the Orioles have had, days when the playoffs were not foreign, mysterious territory. As the former Orioles second baseman and the club's ex-general manager prepare to be enshrined in the Hall of Fame on Sunday, they looked back fondly on their days in Baltimore and offered perspective on the state of the franchise. Alomar, an Oriole from 1996 to 1998, was an All-Star in all three seasons. He helped lead the team to the playoffs in 1996 and 1997, the Orioles losing in the American League Championship Series both years.
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February 24, 2011
July 7, 1998: Roberto Alomar was named the MVP of the All-Star Game.
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January 5, 2011
Alomar, Blyleven, Palmeiro Dan Connolly Baltimore Sun To me, there are three slam-dunk candidates on this year's Hall of Fame ballot: second baseman Roberto Alomar, pitcher Bert Blyleven and first baseman Rafael Palmeiro. Alomar, a 12-time All-Star who should have been elected in his first year of eligibility in 2010, and Blyleven, who is fifth all-time in strikeouts and ninth in shutouts but hasn't been able to break the 75 percent plateau in his first 13 tries, will get in this year.
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February 24, 2011
July 7, 1998: Roberto Alomar was named the MVP of the All-Star Game.
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By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Former Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar had to spend a year in Hall of Fame purgatory, but his short wait is over and — this time — the vote wasn't close. He was named on 90 percent of the ballots to gain induction into Cooperstown on his second try. Pitcher Bert Blyleven took the long route. He was on the ballot for the 14th time before voting members of the Baseball Writers Association of America pushed him past the 75 percent threshold necessary for admission to Cooperstown.
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