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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | May 10, 1991
THE TIMES AND fortunes of Hollywood have forced Robert Townsend to become what he doesn't want to be: a trendsetter.In a perfect world, Townsend would act, write, direct and produce films without having to answer media questions about being one of few blacks in creative control."
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
William D. Townsend, former assistant director of Baltimore County's Department of Public Works and a World War II veteran, died Feb. 23 at Forest Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center in Harford County. He was 92. "The cause of death was failure to thrive," said a son, Michael Townsend, who edited The Baltimore Sun's Harford Sun from 1980 to 1993 and lives in Burlington, Vt. The son of a hunting and fishing guide and a restaurant worker, William Dumond Townsend was born and raised in Timonium.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 11, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Robert Townsend, Dame Edna and a new anthology series co-produced by Robert De Niro are some of the surprises Fox has for its viewers in the next few months.With Keenan Ivory Wayans gone from "In Living Color," Fox executives can't say enough nice things about "The Robert Townsend Variety Show," scheduled to debut in late spring.Townsend -- the writer and director of "Hollywood Shuffle" and "The Five Heartbeats" -- was all enthusiasm for the new show at a press conference to promote it here last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and By Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
When it comes to show business, Robert Townsend knows all the angles. HeM-Fs acted, directed and produced both movies and television shows. In his spare time (ha!), Townsend also tours the standup circuit. Tonight, he begins a three-night run at the Baltimore Comedy Factory. What are you working on these days? I took over a television network. IM-Fm running the secondlargest African-American network to BET. ItM-Fs called the Black Family Channel [MBC on Comcast, to be renamed Black Family Channel next month]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and By Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
When it comes to show business, Robert Townsend knows all the angles. HeM-Fs acted, directed and produced both movies and television shows. In his spare time (ha!), Townsend also tours the standup circuit. Tonight, he begins a three-night run at the Baltimore Comedy Factory. What are you working on these days? I took over a television network. IM-Fm running the secondlargest African-American network to BET. ItM-Fs called the Black Family Channel [MBC on Comcast, to be renamed Black Family Channel next month]
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1998
For Carol Leifer, it's the opportunity for a creative carte blanche.For Robert Townsend, it's the chance for some talented African-American directors, writers and actors to hone their skills.And for Ed McMahon, it's the chance to serve as father figure to a bunch of young kids anxious for the big time.For all three, working for the WB is working for the new network on the block, a reality that may translate to fewer viewers and less exposure but brings with it a host of other benefits."It kind of appealed to me that [the network]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 29, 1991
"The Five Heartbeats" has plenty of heart but not enough beat.Occasionally rising to a level of emotional potency, the movie is more commonly too sketchy as it shunts through a familiar litany of show-biz ups and downs in the life of a black singing group through the '60s and '70s.To begin with, the material is in some sense at war with the formula. It's a great idea and a fresh milieu: those scorchy-hot R&B groups, with their hand jive, their sequin-crazed costumes, and their de rigueur falsetto wailer, that broke through to a mainstream audience in the mid-'60s.
FEATURES
By John Anderson and John Anderson,NEWSDAY | March 28, 1997
The aliens have landed in Beverly Hills and are wearing pumpkin-colored vinyl, stiletto fingernails and earrings like ICBMs.In Robert Townsend's "B.A.P.S." -- which is a kind of immigrant fable -- cultures and classes collide but give way to an ultimately enriched social landscape. But the conflicts don't arise from religious oppression, politics or shrinking quotas. They're about too much mouth, too much South and too much mousse.What are "B.A.P.S."? Black American Princesses, of course.
FEATURES
By Ken Parish Perkins and Ken Parish Perkins,Dallas Morning News | April 1, 1991
In "The Five Heartbeats," Robert Townsend looks geekish as fictional R&B songwriter Donald "Duck" Matthews, a man who possesses a gentle strength and unwavering commitment to his talent. He wears colorful ties and iridescent silk suits.In person, however, Townsend appears "GQ"-ish in baggy, pleated pants, a red shirt and wide-rim glasses. He looks like the successful filmmaker and comedian he is. Sharp. Witty. Confident.But after spending well over an hour talking shop with 200 eager Dallas students, it's easy to see what Townsend and Duck have in common.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
William D. Townsend, former assistant director of Baltimore County's Department of Public Works and a World War II veteran, died Feb. 23 at Forest Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center in Harford County. He was 92. "The cause of death was failure to thrive," said a son, Michael Townsend, who edited The Baltimore Sun's Harford Sun from 1980 to 1993 and lives in Burlington, Vt. The son of a hunting and fishing guide and a restaurant worker, William Dumond Townsend was born and raised in Timonium.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 23, 2002
Both 10,000 Black Men Named George and The Rosa Parks Story are major Black History Month films worthy of your time and the best hopes for such specially themed programs. The problem is you can't watch both at the same time tomorrow night. In the end, the choice between them, though, is not that tough. While Angela Bassett is impressive as the woman often called the "mother" of the civil rights movement, Showtime's 10,000 Black Men Named George is one of those made-for-TV movies that has an important story to tell and the kind of directing and acting that make it hard to imagine how it could have been told any better.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1998
For Carol Leifer, it's the opportunity for a creative carte blanche.For Robert Townsend, it's the chance for some talented African-American directors, writers and actors to hone their skills.And for Ed McMahon, it's the chance to serve as father figure to a bunch of young kids anxious for the big time.For all three, working for the WB is working for the new network on the block, a reality that may translate to fewer viewers and less exposure but brings with it a host of other benefits."It kind of appealed to me that [the network]
FEATURES
By John Anderson and John Anderson,NEWSDAY | March 28, 1997
The aliens have landed in Beverly Hills and are wearing pumpkin-colored vinyl, stiletto fingernails and earrings like ICBMs.In Robert Townsend's "B.A.P.S." -- which is a kind of immigrant fable -- cultures and classes collide but give way to an ultimately enriched social landscape. But the conflicts don't arise from religious oppression, politics or shrinking quotas. They're about too much mouth, too much South and too much mousse.What are "B.A.P.S."? Black American Princesses, of course.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 11, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Robert Townsend, Dame Edna and a new anthology series co-produced by Robert De Niro are some of the surprises Fox has for its viewers in the next few months.With Keenan Ivory Wayans gone from "In Living Color," Fox executives can't say enough nice things about "The Robert Townsend Variety Show," scheduled to debut in late spring.Townsend -- the writer and director of "Hollywood Shuffle" and "The Five Heartbeats" -- was all enthusiasm for the new show at a press conference to promote it here last week.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 22, 1992
High rollers, take heed. There is still time for you to be a kingpin in the second annual Bowling for Scholars at the Towson Fair Lanes on Sunday. The action begins at 4 p.m., when Walter Amprey, superintendent of Baltimore City Public Schools, will get things started by rolling out the first ball.Carol and Arnie Kleiner, president and GM of WMAR-TV, are co-chairing this important fund-raising event, which they hope will make $30,000 for the Learning Bank's endowment fund. If you are not familiar with the Learning Bank, it is an adult literacy center in southwest Baltimore that offers tutoring, classroom instruction and computer-assisted instruction, free of charge.
FEATURES
By Nina J. Easton and Nina J. Easton,Los Angeles Times | November 14, 1991
IN THE WORLD of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust" -- set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s -- earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent.In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City, Calif., lot -- hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 23, 2002
Both 10,000 Black Men Named George and The Rosa Parks Story are major Black History Month films worthy of your time and the best hopes for such specially themed programs. The problem is you can't watch both at the same time tomorrow night. In the end, the choice between them, though, is not that tough. While Angela Bassett is impressive as the woman often called the "mother" of the civil rights movement, Showtime's 10,000 Black Men Named George is one of those made-for-TV movies that has an important story to tell and the kind of directing and acting that make it hard to imagine how it could have been told any better.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 22, 1992
High rollers, take heed. There is still time for you to be a kingpin in the second annual Bowling for Scholars at the Towson Fair Lanes on Sunday. The action begins at 4 p.m., when Walter Amprey, superintendent of Baltimore City Public Schools, will get things started by rolling out the first ball.Carol and Arnie Kleiner, president and GM of WMAR-TV, are co-chairing this important fund-raising event, which they hope will make $30,000 for the Learning Bank's endowment fund. If you are not familiar with the Learning Bank, it is an adult literacy center in southwest Baltimore that offers tutoring, classroom instruction and computer-assisted instruction, free of charge.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | May 10, 1991
THE TIMES AND fortunes of Hollywood have forced Robert Townsend to become what he doesn't want to be: a trendsetter.In a perfect world, Townsend would act, write, direct and produce films without having to answer media questions about being one of few blacks in creative control."
FEATURES
By Ken Parish Perkins and Ken Parish Perkins,Dallas Morning News | April 1, 1991
In "The Five Heartbeats," Robert Townsend looks geekish as fictional R&B songwriter Donald "Duck" Matthews, a man who possesses a gentle strength and unwavering commitment to his talent. He wears colorful ties and iridescent silk suits.In person, however, Townsend appears "GQ"-ish in baggy, pleated pants, a red shirt and wide-rim glasses. He looks like the successful filmmaker and comedian he is. Sharp. Witty. Confident.But after spending well over an hour talking shop with 200 eager Dallas students, it's easy to see what Townsend and Duck have in common.
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