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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 26, 1999
The first of Robert Shaw's many honors was a citation in 1943 from the National Association of Composers and Conductors that called the 26-year-old musician "America's greatest choral conductor." Fifty-six years later it would be hard to find anyone in the mu- sic business who disagreed with that assessment -- except to change "America's greatest" to "the world's."Shaw died yesterday in New Haven, Conn., at the age of 82, of a stroke. He leaves a void in the classical-music world that no single conductor will be able to fill.
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NEWS
April 21, 2005
On April 18, 2005, MARY GRACE SHAW, loving wife of the late J. Robert Shaw, Sr., mother of Anne Marie Krug, Mary Patricia Glover, Mary Jane Hall, Joseph Robert Shaw, Jr., Thomas Richard Shaw, James Gerald Shaw, Timothy Lee Shaw and the late John Eugene Shawn. Also survived by 46 grandchildren, 100 great-grandchildren and 10 great-great-grandchildren Family will receive friends at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME of CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue, (1 mile west of beltway exit 14), on Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where a Wake Service will be held at 4:30 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Agnes Catholic Church in Catonsville on Friday at 10 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery
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FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1995
Robert Shaw chuckles when he says he doesn't mind getting to "the really nasty question first."All right, then, he's asking for it.How does Shaw feel about always being referred to as the great choral conductor, rather than simply as a great conductor."
NEWS
April 21, 2005
Mary G. Shaw, a homemaker and former secretary who had more than 160 descendants spanning four generations, died of a stroke Monday at her Catonsville home. She was 97. Born Mary Grace McCummings in Baltimore and raised on 34th Street, she earned a business diploma at the old St. Paul's School in East Baltimore. She then became a secretary to architects Edward L. Palmer and William D. Lamdin and prepared construction documents for St. Casimir's Roman Catholic Church, which they designed in the mid-1920s.
NEWS
April 21, 2005
On April 18, 2005, MARY GRACE SHAW, loving wife of the late J. Robert Shaw, Sr., mother of Anne Marie Krug, Mary Patricia Glover, Mary Jane Hall, Joseph Robert Shaw, Jr., Thomas Richard Shaw, James Gerald Shaw, Timothy Lee Shaw and the late John Eugene Shawn. Also survived by 46 grandchildren, 100 great-grandchildren and 10 great-great-grandchildren Family will receive friends at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME of CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue, (1 mile west of beltway exit 14), on Thursday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where a Wake Service will be held at 4:30 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Agnes Catholic Church in Catonsville on Friday at 10 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery
NEWS
April 21, 2005
Mary G. Shaw, a homemaker and former secretary who had more than 160 descendants spanning four generations, died of a stroke Monday at her Catonsville home. She was 97. Born Mary Grace McCummings in Baltimore and raised on 34th Street, she earned a business diploma at the old St. Paul's School in East Baltimore. She then became a secretary to architects Edward L. Palmer and William D. Lamdin and prepared construction documents for St. Casimir's Roman Catholic Church, which they designed in the mid-1920s.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter MOVIES Olmos directs, stars in 'American Me' | March 14, 1992
VIDEO'Tom Jones' at lastProbably the only great film not yet on video at last makes it to tape. That's Tony Richardson's exuberant "Tom Jones," with Albert Finney (whom it made a star) in the title role. From Henry Fielding's novel, it's a raucous, raunchy look at 18th century England, a place of both high morals and high jinx. Tony Richardson directed. It won Best Film Oscar in 1963."American Me" is extremely violent, but possibly necessary. Edward James Olmos directed himself in this story of a brilliant Hispanic-American whose rise and fall in the drug trade is a cautionary tale for anyone willing to listen.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 1995
This review is from yesterday's late editions.The popular title of Mozart's uncompleted C Minor Mass is "The Great," and the word for the performance it received Thursday night in Meyerhoff Hall from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Chorus is tremendous. This was the best playing this listener has heard the BSO do this season, and, young though this season is, he does not expect to hear better.The chief reason for this excellence was the presence of Robert Shaw on the podium. Shaw is so often (and has been for so long)
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | February 21, 1994
The arts can learn from business. But business can learn from the arts, too, especially with creativity taking on increasing commercial importance.Consider five lessons from the arts section of the Jan. 25, 1994 New York Times:* 1. Success breeds failure. The lead story discussed the travails of the Sundance Film Festival, started by Robert Redford to tout exciting, low-budget films that get short shrift from Hollywood's high-powered distributors. Trouble is, the festival's success has turned it into a showcase for the establishment; huge studios have started using Sundance to market high-budget releases.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 20, 1999
Beethoven's "Missa Solemnis" is grouped together with certain of his other late works, such as the "Hammerklavier Sonata" and "Diabelli Variations" for piano and the "Grosse Fugue" for string quartet. Of such pieces it is either said that they are among "the greatest unplayable" or "the greatest boring" works in the canon.Thursday evening's performance of this masterpiece in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Chorus and guest conductor Jeffrey Tate was beset by a number of non-musical problems -- no less than three last-minute cancellations and substitutions among the soloists.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 1999
True to its name and its origins, the Thanksgiving holiday inspires in us feelings of gratitude for life and an appreciation of our extraordinary heritage as Americans. And in my house, right up there with turkey and stuffing, (ahead, even, of football), there is beautiful music on hand to bring these themes home for the holiday.For the plushest, good old American hymn-sing around, I turn to "Amazing Grace," an assortment of 20 vintage hymns and spirituals arranged and conducted by the late Robert Shaw (Telarc 80325)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 20, 1999
Beethoven's "Missa Solemnis" is grouped together with certain of his other late works, such as the "Hammerklavier Sonata" and "Diabelli Variations" for piano and the "Grosse Fugue" for string quartet. Of such pieces it is either said that they are among "the greatest unplayable" or "the greatest boring" works in the canon.Thursday evening's performance of this masterpiece in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Chorus and guest conductor Jeffrey Tate was beset by a number of non-musical problems -- no less than three last-minute cancellations and substitutions among the soloists.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 26, 1999
The first of Robert Shaw's many honors was a citation in 1943 from the National Association of Composers and Conductors that called the 26-year-old musician "America's greatest choral conductor." Fifty-six years later it would be hard to find anyone in the mu- sic business who disagreed with that assessment -- except to change "America's greatest" to "the world's."Shaw died yesterday in New Haven, Conn., at the age of 82, of a stroke. He leaves a void in the classical-music world that no single conductor will be able to fill.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
Christmas is attuned to music as no other season, so what could stuff a stocking for the music lover on your list better than the gift of melody? Here are some suggestions.For the "Messiah" enthusiast: Nothing sums up the spirit of Christmas better than Handel's oratorio. My recommendations haven't changed much in recent years: Andrew Davis (EMI) for the grand, large-scale approach; Robert Shaw (Telarc) for a lovely middle-of-the-road version; and Sir Colin Davis (Philips Duo) for an outstanding budget choice that brings the music alive with an appealing intimacy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 1995
This review is from yesterday's late editions.The popular title of Mozart's uncompleted C Minor Mass is "The Great," and the word for the performance it received Thursday night in Meyerhoff Hall from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Chorus is tremendous. This was the best playing this listener has heard the BSO do this season, and, young though this season is, he does not expect to hear better.The chief reason for this excellence was the presence of Robert Shaw on the podium. Shaw is so often (and has been for so long)
FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1995
Robert Shaw chuckles when he says he doesn't mind getting to "the really nasty question first."All right, then, he's asking for it.How does Shaw feel about always being referred to as the great choral conductor, rather than simply as a great conductor."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 1999
True to its name and its origins, the Thanksgiving holiday inspires in us feelings of gratitude for life and an appreciation of our extraordinary heritage as Americans. And in my house, right up there with turkey and stuffing, (ahead, even, of football), there is beautiful music on hand to bring these themes home for the holiday.For the plushest, good old American hymn-sing around, I turn to "Amazing Grace," an assortment of 20 vintage hymns and spirituals arranged and conducted by the late Robert Shaw (Telarc 80325)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
Christmas is attuned to music as no other season, so what could stuff a stocking for the music lover on your list better than the gift of melody? Here are some suggestions.For the "Messiah" enthusiast: Nothing sums up the spirit of Christmas better than Handel's oratorio. My recommendations haven't changed much in recent years: Andrew Davis (EMI) for the grand, large-scale approach; Robert Shaw (Telarc) for a lovely middle-of-the-road version; and Sir Colin Davis (Philips Duo) for an outstanding budget choice that brings the music alive with an appealing intimacy.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | February 21, 1994
The arts can learn from business. But business can learn from the arts, too, especially with creativity taking on increasing commercial importance.Consider five lessons from the arts section of the Jan. 25, 1994 New York Times:* 1. Success breeds failure. The lead story discussed the travails of the Sundance Film Festival, started by Robert Redford to tout exciting, low-budget films that get short shrift from Hollywood's high-powered distributors. Trouble is, the festival's success has turned it into a showcase for the establishment; huge studios have started using Sundance to market high-budget releases.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter MOVIES Olmos directs, stars in 'American Me' | March 14, 1992
VIDEO'Tom Jones' at lastProbably the only great film not yet on video at last makes it to tape. That's Tony Richardson's exuberant "Tom Jones," with Albert Finney (whom it made a star) in the title role. From Henry Fielding's novel, it's a raucous, raunchy look at 18th century England, a place of both high morals and high jinx. Tony Richardson directed. It won Best Film Oscar in 1963."American Me" is extremely violent, but possibly necessary. Edward James Olmos directed himself in this story of a brilliant Hispanic-American whose rise and fall in the drug trade is a cautionary tale for anyone willing to listen.
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