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By Daniel Schlosberg and Daniel Schlosberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2000
Did Clara Schumann have an affair with Johannes Brahms? Acclaimed pianist Ruth Laredo thinks she knows the answer, although other experts vigorously disagree. "They had a torrid love affair," Laredo said. "There's no way they couldn't have." It's one of the topics she'll address in her "concert with commentary" Friday night at the University of Maryland, College Park. Laredo started giving this type of recital, which mixes performance with anecdotes about the composers' lives, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
Robert Schumann heard so much music in his head, he felt compelled to compose. "I cannot help it," he wrote to his wife, Clara, "and should like to sing myself to death, like a nightingale. " When he died at the age of 46 in an asylum, the only sounds he made were unintelligible to Clara and the doctors. It was a pathetic end to one of the greatest figures of 19th-century German Romanticism. This weekend, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will examine Schumann's troubled mind in an "Off the Cuff" presentation led by music director Marin Alsop.
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By Stephen Wigler | February 15, 1996
When most cellists name their favorite cello-and-orchestra work, they usually don't mention the demonstrative, audience-pleasing concerto by Antonin Dvorak, but the inward-looking one of Robert Schumann. This piece requires an interpreter who can draw from a deep well of fantasy and who is fearless emotionally.To those familiar with her playing, Gita Roche seems like a good bet to match Schumann's challenges. The popular young cellist will perform the work with conductor Ann Harrigan and the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra on Wednesday.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
The intrigue will continue apace at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts on March 26 and 27 when the Annapolis Symphony reconvenes its search for a conductor to replace Leslie B. Dunner. This time around, the visiting maestro will be Emil de Cou, the associate conductor of Leonard Slatkin's National Symphony Orchestra, who will conduct a varied program of Samuel Barber's Second Essay for Orchestra, Robert Schumann Piano Concerto and Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony. A Los Angeles native, de Cou began his professional career on the other side of the baton, as principal French horn of Germany's Baden State Theatre and of Austria's Mozart Opera of Salzburg.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
The intrigue will continue apace at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts on March 26 and 27 when the Annapolis Symphony reconvenes its search for a conductor to replace Leslie B. Dunner. This time around, the visiting maestro will be Emil de Cou, the associate conductor of Leonard Slatkin's National Symphony Orchestra, who will conduct a varied program of Samuel Barber's Second Essay for Orchestra, Robert Schumann Piano Concerto and Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony. A Los Angeles native, de Cou began his professional career on the other side of the baton, as principal French horn of Germany's Baden State Theatre and of Austria's Mozart Opera of Salzburg.
NEWS
February 22, 1992
Non-music lovers may have been puzzled by news of the recent death of composer William Schuman. They were probably thinking of Robert Schumann (1810-1856), the German Romantic composer, music critic and mentor to Brahms. Yet William Schuman (1912-1992) occupied a comparable place in American musical history: He was among this century's most important composers of the modern American school. As a teacher and arts administrator, he was one of the most influential voices on the U.S. cultural scene.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 4, 1996
Robert Schumann, Cello Concerto, Paul Hindemith, Cello Concerto, performed by cellist Janos Starker and the Bamberg Symphony (RCA Victor Red Seal 09026-68027); Schumann, Piano Concerto, Richard Strauss, "Burleske," performed by pianist Helene Grimaud and the German Symphony Orchestra of Berlin, David Zinman conducting (Erato 0630-11727); Schumann, Piano Concerto, Sergei Prokofiev, Piano Concerto No. 3, performed by pianist Van Cliburn and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner (in Schumann)
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
Ladies and gentlemen, the celebrated pianist Clara Schumann will now take questions from the press.Reporter: Madame Schumann, it has been more than a century since your last recital. Why are you now again on tour?Clara Schumann: Oh, it has been longer than that! I stopped performing in 1890. I was 71, and I was going deaf, you know. Anyway, it is not I on tour, but a clever pianist named Beverly Serra-Brooks. She dresses as me, plays my music and talks about my life.Reporter: Tell us about her.Schumann: She is a beautiful woman of 40 who lives in Pasadena -- the one in California -- with her husband, the composer Lee Brooks.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 24, 1991
An article about Robert Schumann in yesterday's Arts and Entertainment section gave an incorrect cause of death for the 19th-century composer. Schumann attempted but did not succeed in committing suicide."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
Robert Schumann heard so much music in his head, he felt compelled to compose. "I cannot help it," he wrote to his wife, Clara, "and should like to sing myself to death, like a nightingale. " When he died at the age of 46 in an asylum, the only sounds he made were unintelligible to Clara and the doctors. It was a pathetic end to one of the greatest figures of 19th-century German Romanticism. This weekend, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will examine Schumann's troubled mind in an "Off the Cuff" presentation led by music director Marin Alsop.
FEATURES
By Daniel Schlosberg and Daniel Schlosberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2000
Did Clara Schumann have an affair with Johannes Brahms? Acclaimed pianist Ruth Laredo thinks she knows the answer, although other experts vigorously disagree. "They had a torrid love affair," Laredo said. "There's no way they couldn't have." It's one of the topics she'll address in her "concert with commentary" Friday night at the University of Maryland, College Park. Laredo started giving this type of recital, which mixes performance with anecdotes about the composers' lives, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
Ladies and gentlemen, the celebrated pianist Clara Schumann will now take questions from the press.Reporter: Madame Schumann, it has been more than a century since your last recital. Why are you now again on tour?Clara Schumann: Oh, it has been longer than that! I stopped performing in 1890. I was 71, and I was going deaf, you know. Anyway, it is not I on tour, but a clever pianist named Beverly Serra-Brooks. She dresses as me, plays my music and talks about my life.Reporter: Tell us about her.Schumann: She is a beautiful woman of 40 who lives in Pasadena -- the one in California -- with her husband, the composer Lee Brooks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | February 15, 1996
When most cellists name their favorite cello-and-orchestra work, they usually don't mention the demonstrative, audience-pleasing concerto by Antonin Dvorak, but the inward-looking one of Robert Schumann. This piece requires an interpreter who can draw from a deep well of fantasy and who is fearless emotionally.To those familiar with her playing, Gita Roche seems like a good bet to match Schumann's challenges. The popular young cellist will perform the work with conductor Ann Harrigan and the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 4, 1996
Robert Schumann, Cello Concerto, Paul Hindemith, Cello Concerto, performed by cellist Janos Starker and the Bamberg Symphony (RCA Victor Red Seal 09026-68027); Schumann, Piano Concerto, Richard Strauss, "Burleske," performed by pianist Helene Grimaud and the German Symphony Orchestra of Berlin, David Zinman conducting (Erato 0630-11727); Schumann, Piano Concerto, Sergei Prokofiev, Piano Concerto No. 3, performed by pianist Van Cliburn and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner (in Schumann)
NEWS
February 22, 1992
Non-music lovers may have been puzzled by news of the recent death of composer William Schuman. They were probably thinking of Robert Schumann (1810-1856), the German Romantic composer, music critic and mentor to Brahms. Yet William Schuman (1912-1992) occupied a comparable place in American musical history: He was among this century's most important composers of the modern American school. As a teacher and arts administrator, he was one of the most influential voices on the U.S. cultural scene.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 24, 1991
An article about Robert Schumann in yesterday's Arts and Entertainment section gave an incorrect cause of death for the 19th-century composer. Schumann attempted but did not succeed in committing suicide."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Keys | February 17, 2000
Jon Marans' "Old Wicked Songs" makes its Baltimore premiere at Theatre Hopkins tomorrow. Set in Vienna during Kurt Waldheim's 1986 campaign to become president of Austria, the 1996 Pulitzer Prize-contender traces the relationship between a young American concert pianist and his elderly professor. The play, starring Stephen Antonsen and Robert Riggs, also examines the emotional charge of music, and uses Robert Schumann's song cycle the "Dichterliebe" ("The Poet's Love") as a framework for the story.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
THE MEYERHOFF Symphony Hall served up several treats last night. Get yourself there by 8:15 p.m. tonight if you'd like to hear piano or drum dramatics and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in sharp form.Sheer piano excitement the old-fashioned way came in the firm fingers of the Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire playing Robert Schumann's Romantic "Piano Concerto in A Minor" (1846). Accompanying him, the BSO -- under James DePreist -- continued its winning ways with Schumann after producing a marvelous CD of his first and fourth symphonies this year.
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