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Robert Rodriguez

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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2001
I can't tell whether the addition of a droll and scary underwater scene significantly changes Spy Kids, because I missed the March premiere of the original edition. I can say this: no other PG movie in the year 2001 - and no G, PG-13, or R-rated picture either - has topped this excellent adventure for ebullience and inventive wit. Remember how once upon a time everyone yearned for the Bond franchise to renew itself with a marriage between 007 and Diana Rigg? Director Robert Rodriguez has devised a Bond movie about family bonds, and it's more fun than any bona fide adult Bond movie since The Spy Who Loved Me. The bonding and the Bondage mesh seamlessly: The movie had me thinking merrily back to old Mad magazine mock-advertising slogans - like "the family that slays together, stays together."
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By Chris Lee | November 2, 2007
You can forgive Josh Brolin for coming off like some adjunct professor from the school of hard knocks when he's discussing the life lessons that have shaped his outlook - essential truths that accompany watching his stock rise and fall and rise again. After all, the journeyman actor has faced both feast and famine in Hollywood. Over a two-decade-plus career, he has been pigeonholed variously as a jock (in his debut kid flick, 1985's The Goonies), a cocky young leading man (in his Old West TV series The Young Riders)
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | April 16, 2007
Murder, rape, dismemberment and cannibalism. The newest slasher flick at the multiplex? Or, the latest post-modern work by Quentin Tarantino or Robert Rodriguez? No, the man behind this particular gore fest is the greatest writer in the English language, and the work is Titus Andronicus. Titus Andronicus continues through May 20 at the Shakespeare Theatre Company, 450 Seventh St. N.W., Washington. $19-$76.25. 877-487-8849 or shakespearetheatre.org.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | April 16, 2007
Murder, rape, dismemberment and cannibalism. The newest slasher flick at the multiplex? Or, the latest post-modern work by Quentin Tarantino or Robert Rodriguez? No, the man behind this particular gore fest is the greatest writer in the English language, and the work is Titus Andronicus. Titus Andronicus continues through May 20 at the Shakespeare Theatre Company, 450 Seventh St. N.W., Washington. $19-$76.25. 877-487-8849 or shakespearetheatre.org.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 13, 2007
So the Weinstein Co., disappointed with the relatively poor box office of Grindhouse (less than $12 million its first week), is thinking about sawing the double-feature in half, releasing each of the two films it encompasses - Robert Rodriguez's Planet Terror and Quentin Tarantino's Death Proof - separately? Two problems with that: 1) Won't that defeat part of the purpose, which was to replicate the experience of going to those fabled second-rate movie houses back in the early '70s, where sleazy double features were the rule?
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1995
"Four Rooms," no vu.You people must have been very naughty to get this lump of coal in your Christmas stocking! A collection of four "short stories" written and directed by four allegedly talented, hip young directors, the movie is a total catastrophe. Ninety minutes long, it produces but one laugh and that one doesn't arrive until Minute 90. Worse, the film is actually annoying."Four Rooms" is set in an aging Hollywood hotel on New Year's Eve and follows one character, the new bellhop Ted (Tim Roth)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 12, 2003
From his $7,500 debut film El Mariachi, Robert Rodriguez has never ceased to be a do-it-yourselfer. He takes nine credits on Once Upon a Time in Mexico, from co-producer, writer and director to production designer and visual-effects supervisor. He's also the cinematographer, the editor and the composer - or, as the movie's titles put it, he "shot, chopped and scored" it. On the set or in the editing room, he must operate like Spider-Man's Doc Ock, and it's fun to see a filmmaker proclaiming that he's had a good time.
FEATURES
By Chris Lee | November 2, 2007
You can forgive Josh Brolin for coming off like some adjunct professor from the school of hard knocks when he's discussing the life lessons that have shaped his outlook - essential truths that accompany watching his stock rise and fall and rise again. After all, the journeyman actor has faced both feast and famine in Hollywood. Over a two-decade-plus career, he has been pigeonholed variously as a jock (in his debut kid flick, 1985's The Goonies), a cocky young leading man (in his Old West TV series The Young Riders)
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 30, 2001
`Spy Kids' Rated PG Sun score: ** "Spy Kids" is about a pair of kids with surprisingly cool parents and lots of cool gizmos, who go on some really cool adventures. Problem is, the movie's not nearly as cool as the setup. Oh sure, really young children might enjoy it. But here's betting older kids, those raised on "Star Wars"-caliber special effects, who expect movies with action and exciting stories, are going to find this effort wanting. And adults aren't going to be roped in either, not even by a wholesome ending that feels like it was grafted on at the last minute in one last effort to make a film the whole family can not only see but also embrace.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | July 28, 1995
Washington -- THE MORE Bill Clinton and administration stooges plead that replaying the Waco, Texas, shootout besmirches U.S. lawmen, the phonier their damage control sounds.What if inept air controllers were causing jet-liner crashes?Or corrupt Internal Revenue Service agents letting zillionaire taxpayers off the hook?Wouldn't airing the truth clean house and blow away paranoia?But with congressional hearings on Waco halfway home, you can understand the president's thin skin about the screw-up on his watch.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 13, 2007
So the Weinstein Co., disappointed with the relatively poor box office of Grindhouse (less than $12 million its first week), is thinking about sawing the double-feature in half, releasing each of the two films it encompasses - Robert Rodriguez's Planet Terror and Quentin Tarantino's Death Proof - separately? Two problems with that: 1) Won't that defeat part of the purpose, which was to replicate the experience of going to those fabled second-rate movie houses back in the early '70s, where sleazy double features were the rule?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 12, 2003
From his $7,500 debut film El Mariachi, Robert Rodriguez has never ceased to be a do-it-yourselfer. He takes nine credits on Once Upon a Time in Mexico, from co-producer, writer and director to production designer and visual-effects supervisor. He's also the cinematographer, the editor and the composer - or, as the movie's titles put it, he "shot, chopped and scored" it. On the set or in the editing room, he must operate like Spider-Man's Doc Ock, and it's fun to see a filmmaker proclaiming that he's had a good time.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2001
I can't tell whether the addition of a droll and scary underwater scene significantly changes Spy Kids, because I missed the March premiere of the original edition. I can say this: no other PG movie in the year 2001 - and no G, PG-13, or R-rated picture either - has topped this excellent adventure for ebullience and inventive wit. Remember how once upon a time everyone yearned for the Bond franchise to renew itself with a marriage between 007 and Diana Rigg? Director Robert Rodriguez has devised a Bond movie about family bonds, and it's more fun than any bona fide adult Bond movie since The Spy Who Loved Me. The bonding and the Bondage mesh seamlessly: The movie had me thinking merrily back to old Mad magazine mock-advertising slogans - like "the family that slays together, stays together."
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 30, 2001
`Spy Kids' Rated PG Sun score: ** "Spy Kids" is about a pair of kids with surprisingly cool parents and lots of cool gizmos, who go on some really cool adventures. Problem is, the movie's not nearly as cool as the setup. Oh sure, really young children might enjoy it. But here's betting older kids, those raised on "Star Wars"-caliber special effects, who expect movies with action and exciting stories, are going to find this effort wanting. And adults aren't going to be roped in either, not even by a wholesome ending that feels like it was grafted on at the last minute in one last effort to make a film the whole family can not only see but also embrace.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1995
"Four Rooms," no vu.You people must have been very naughty to get this lump of coal in your Christmas stocking! A collection of four "short stories" written and directed by four allegedly talented, hip young directors, the movie is a total catastrophe. Ninety minutes long, it produces but one laugh and that one doesn't arrive until Minute 90. Worse, the film is actually annoying."Four Rooms" is set in an aging Hollywood hotel on New Year's Eve and follows one character, the new bellhop Ted (Tim Roth)
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | July 28, 1995
Washington -- THE MORE Bill Clinton and administration stooges plead that replaying the Waco, Texas, shootout besmirches U.S. lawmen, the phonier their damage control sounds.What if inept air controllers were causing jet-liner crashes?Or corrupt Internal Revenue Service agents letting zillionaire taxpayers off the hook?Wouldn't airing the truth clean house and blow away paranoia?But with congressional hearings on Waco halfway home, you can understand the president's thin skin about the screw-up on his watch.
FEATURES
By Kimberly Goad and Kimberly Goad,Dallas Morning News | May 16, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- The phone is ringing. Again."Hi, Robert . . . !"Robert -- Robert Rodriguez, the 24-year-old filmmaker whose "El Mariachi" has cast him as Hollywood's newest Boy Wonder -- lets the answering machine take the call. The voice of Hollywood rings out."You did a fantastic job on the script. Just great. We'll wait to hear from the guys at Columbia." The voice is that of Mr. Rodriguez's agent at International Creative Management.The day before, Mr. Rodriguez express-mailed the screenplay for his sequel to "El Mariachi," the movie he wrote, directed and co-produced on summer break after his senior year at the University of Texas.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 6, 2007
The first film centers on a go-go dancer named Cherry Darling, the second on a battle-scarred stunt driver known only as Stuntman Mike. The first film deals with a deadly virus that turns people into oozing pustules of glop you don't want to be anywhere near, the second with a guy who gets his thrills by driving head first into other cars. The first film has a woman with a machine gun for a prosthetic leg, the second a woman who straps herself to the hood of a car racing along at 100 mph. Get the feeling we're not in Masterpiece Theatre territory here?
FEATURES
By Kimberly Goad and Kimberly Goad,Dallas Morning News | May 16, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- The phone is ringing. Again."Hi, Robert . . . !"Robert -- Robert Rodriguez, the 24-year-old filmmaker whose "El Mariachi" has cast him as Hollywood's newest Boy Wonder -- lets the answering machine take the call. The voice of Hollywood rings out."You did a fantastic job on the script. Just great. We'll wait to hear from the guys at Columbia." The voice is that of Mr. Rodriguez's agent at International Creative Management.The day before, Mr. Rodriguez express-mailed the screenplay for his sequel to "El Mariachi," the movie he wrote, directed and co-produced on summer break after his senior year at the University of Texas.
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