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Robert Prosky

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December 11, 2008
ROBERT PROSKY, 77 Character actor appeared in 'Hill Street Blues' Robert Prosky, a character actor with hundreds of credits on stage and screen including Mrs. Doubtfire and Hill Street Blues, died Monday night in Washington, D.C., of complications from a heart procedure. Mr. Prosky appeared in more than 200 plays on Broadway and with Arena Stage, a regional theater company in Washington. He appeared in 38 films and numerous television shows. A native of Philadelphia, Mr. Prosky studied economics at Temple University and served in the Air Force.
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NEWS
December 11, 2008
ROBERT PROSKY, 77 Character actor appeared in 'Hill Street Blues' Robert Prosky, a character actor with hundreds of credits on stage and screen including Mrs. Doubtfire and Hill Street Blues, died Monday night in Washington, D.C., of complications from a heart procedure. Mr. Prosky appeared in more than 200 plays on Broadway and with Arena Stage, a regional theater company in Washington. He appeared in 38 films and numerous television shows. A native of Philadelphia, Mr. Prosky studied economics at Temple University and served in the Air Force.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 13, 1990
Live theater will offer some exciting things in the Baltimore-Washington area during the upcoming months. Here are some titles and dates to watch for:* "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," written by August Wilson, author of "The Piano Lesson," is one of a series of plays dramatizing the life of black Americans. It opens Sept. 28 at Center Stage.* "Tru" opens the Morris A. Mechanic season. Robert Morse is the star of this one-man show in which he plays Truman Capote reacting to the reaction of some of the close "friends" he wrote about in less than flattering prose.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 4, 2000
"When they started this fire here, they never figured it would light up the whole sky," says the defense attorney in the courtroom drama "Inherit the Wind." But despite a star-studded cast, the production at Ford's Theatre in Washington never generates much power. The problem doesn't lie in Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee's 40-year-old play. A fictionalized account of the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial, the play has not only proved itself decade after decade, but also still occasionally engenders controversy, as it did in our own back yard in the 1980s when Harford County tried to prohibit a middle-school production.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 29, 1994
On an obvious level, Arthur Miller's "The Price" is a play about selling old furniture and airing dirty laundry. On a deeper level, it explores how two brothers can be raised in the same household, yet grow up unable to understand each other. But most importantly, "The Price" is about decency, defined as behavior arising out of sheer altruism.Under the direction of Joe Dowling, Arena Stage's production of this 1968 drama emphasizes all of these central points. But it is Stanley Anderson's deeply felt portrayal of Victor, the self-sacrificing policeman brother, that brings Miller's definition of decency to prominent, full-blooded life.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 4, 2000
"When they started this fire here, they never figured it would light up the whole sky," says the defense attorney in the courtroom drama "Inherit the Wind." But despite a star-studded cast, the production at Ford's Theatre in Washington never generates much power. The problem doesn't lie in Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee's 40-year-old play. A fictionalized account of the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial, the play has not only proved itself decade after decade, but also still occasionally engenders controversy, as it did in our own back yard in the 1980s when Harford County tried to prohibit a middle-school production.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 19, 1996
To kill or not to kill, that is the question, and "Dead Man Walking," to its credit, doesn't have an answer. It seems to suggest the moral complexities of capital punishment are too dense for glib solutions.A meditation disguised (effectively) as a drama, it chronicles a naive but good-hearted nun's engagement in the life and ultimate execution of a Louisiana death row inmate. But unlike so many obligatory liberal screeds on capital punishment, Tim Robbins' brilliant and lacerating movie plays fair.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
YOU SHOULD know, before you consider seeing ''Funny About Love,'' that this is a drama with more than a -- of comedy. The presence of Gene Wilder in the cast might lead you to believe that it's all comedy.In large part, it is an interesting, diverting film. The opening scenes are quite good. In these, a cartoonist, played by Wilder, meets a caterer, played by Christine Lahti.It's always reassuring to know that Lahti is in the cast of any film. But there are some troublesome scenes early in the movie that she and Wilder must go through before we get to the better part of the movie.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 19, 1990
Relax, Angela Lansbury fans, NBC has a scheduling ploy for you.Assuming the World Series goes five games, CBS will be pre-empting Lansbury's popular series "Murder, She Wrote" on Sunday night. But, at the same moment it usually comes on the air -- 8 o'clock -- NBC (Channel 2, WMAR) will show a new TV movie starring Lansbury, "The Love She Sought."And, in fact, it's a lot better than an episode of "Murder, She Wrote." Though its plot always teeters on the edge of cliche and contrivance, "The Love She Sought" is constantly pulled back onto the terra firma of solid drama by excellent acting and insightful characterizations.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 18, 1991
Gerard Depardieu is the big surprise in ''Green Card.'' The actor, without whom there might be no film industry in France, does surprisingly well with his lines. It's surprising because he doesn't really know the English language and was doing his lines by rote.The movie is a minor if not a major pleasure. One of the more interesting things about it is that it was directed by Peter Weir, the Australian who did ''Witness'' and ''Dead Poets Society.'' ''Green Card'' is not the sort of thing you'd expect from someone who did these and ''Picnic at Hanging Rock.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 19, 1996
To kill or not to kill, that is the question, and "Dead Man Walking," to its credit, doesn't have an answer. It seems to suggest the moral complexities of capital punishment are too dense for glib solutions.A meditation disguised (effectively) as a drama, it chronicles a naive but good-hearted nun's engagement in the life and ultimate execution of a Louisiana death row inmate. But unlike so many obligatory liberal screeds on capital punishment, Tim Robbins' brilliant and lacerating movie plays fair.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 29, 1994
On an obvious level, Arthur Miller's "The Price" is a play about selling old furniture and airing dirty laundry. On a deeper level, it explores how two brothers can be raised in the same household, yet grow up unable to understand each other. But most importantly, "The Price" is about decency, defined as behavior arising out of sheer altruism.Under the direction of Joe Dowling, Arena Stage's production of this 1968 drama emphasizes all of these central points. But it is Stanley Anderson's deeply felt portrayal of Victor, the self-sacrificing policeman brother, that brings Miller's definition of decency to prominent, full-blooded life.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 13, 1990
Live theater will offer some exciting things in the Baltimore-Washington area during the upcoming months. Here are some titles and dates to watch for:* "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," written by August Wilson, author of "The Piano Lesson," is one of a series of plays dramatizing the life of black Americans. It opens Sept. 28 at Center Stage.* "Tru" opens the Morris A. Mechanic season. Robert Morse is the star of this one-man show in which he plays Truman Capote reacting to the reaction of some of the close "friends" he wrote about in less than flattering prose.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 3, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Nearly everyone involved in the making of a film bemoans a favorite scene that ends up on the cutting-room floor. We asked some film makers associated with a handful of 1990 movies to tell us about the outtakes they most remember -- or regret.The rough cut of Orion Pictures' "Dances With Wolves" -- the story of a U.S. soldier befriended by a tribe of Sioux Indians fighting for survival against invading whites -- came in at over five hours, and two hours had to be chopped. Film editor Neil Travis had no trouble picking the scene he and director-producer-star Kevin Costner would have most liked to save.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
The smart money's on "Nova" tonight. Check it out."Voters Ask '96" (7: 30 p.m.-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Second District Congressional candidates Robert Ehrlich and Connie DeJuliis square off, answering questions posed by the League of Women Voters. Jeff Salkin moderates."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Paul and Jamie's baby isn't even here yet, and already it's making trouble. See, Paul and Ira (John Pankow) seem to have misplaced Paul's father, a situation that's threatening to make Paul late for a doctor's appointment where he and Jamie will first hear the kid's heartbeat.
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