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Robert Novak

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NEWS
April 3, 2003
On March 30, 2003, REGINA NOVAK (nee Wajbel), age 94, of Orlando, FL, formerly of Baltimore, MD. She was a member of St. Casimir's Church. Beloved wife of the late Adam P. Novak, Sr. Devoted mother of Delores Nagrabski and her husband Steve, Robert Novak and his wife Sally and the late Adam P. Jr. Dear sister of Raymond and Amiel Wajbel. Loving grandmother of Steve and Richard Nagrabski and Robert, Jr. and James Novak. Also survived by four great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 10, 2008
I haven't read Robert Novak's column in 10 years. Back in 1998, he made a comment on CNN - what it was is not material here - that I considered beyond the pale. I decided I could henceforth do without his opinions and insights. He impressed me as a distinctly disagreeable man. And that was well before he outed CIA operative Valerie Plame. When the news broke recently that Mr. Novak had a brain tumor and would retire, I was not made prostrate by grief. What I felt was that whisper of common mortality, that sense of there-but-for-the-grace-of-God one usually feels when tragedy strikes someone who is known to you, but not too closely.
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NEWS
August 27, 2005
On August 22, 2005, RUTH ANNJACKSON (nee Novak), dearest wife of the late Robert A. Jackson, devoted mother of Bonnie L. Werner and husband Jerry, dear sister of Robert Novak, loving grandmother of Jerry L. Werner and Stacey A. Brack, and husband Ronnie. Beloved great grandmother of Allie, Jake, and Mattie Brack. Also survived by other loving relatives and friends. Family invites friends to call at the Charles L. Stevens Funeral Home, Inc., 1501 E. Fort Avenue, Locust Point, MD, on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held at the Church of the Redemption on Saturday at 11 A.M. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | August 1, 2007
Many, if not most, college commencement addresses are essentially special-interest advertising. Politicians, political activists, judges and bureaucrats tell the graduating students how it is nobler to go into "public service" - that is, to become a politician, political activist, judge or bureaucrat - instead of going into the private sector and producing goods and services that people want enough to spend their own money for them. Parents who want to counteract politically correct commencement speeches - often after four years of politically correct indoctrination on campus - might include among the things they give their graduate a new book titled The Prince of Darkness by columnist Robert Novak.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Avoiding a clash over the First Amendment and possibly jail time, a reporter for Time has given a deposition to a prosecutor investigating the disclosure of the identity of a CIA operative, the magazine said yesterday. The reporter, Matthew Cooper, had been ordered by a federal judge to respond to questions posed by Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the special counsel investigating whether the Bush administration illegally leaked the CIA agent's name. Shortly after Fitzgerald interviewed Cooper on Monday, U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan lifted the contempt citation he had issued against the reporter.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 12, 1998
Baltimore police commanders are supposed to be on the streets as much as possible. But Maj. Robert Novak took that a step further yesterday afternoon when he ran four blocks to chase down a theft suspect.Novak, 49, said he was driving by a rowhouse under construction in the 300 block of E. 30th St. when he heard a loud noise and saw a man running out the front door.Novak, who was wearing his uniform, drove after the suspect and tried to cut him off, then jumped out of his unmarked car and started to chase him along Greenmount Avenue.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | August 1, 2007
Many, if not most, college commencement addresses are essentially special-interest advertising. Politicians, political activists, judges and bureaucrats tell the graduating students how it is nobler to go into "public service" - that is, to become a politician, political activist, judge or bureaucrat - instead of going into the private sector and producing goods and services that people want enough to spend their own money for them. Parents who want to counteract politically correct commencement speeches - often after four years of politically correct indoctrination on campus - might include among the things they give their graduate a new book titled The Prince of Darkness by columnist Robert Novak.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 10, 2008
I haven't read Robert Novak's column in 10 years. Back in 1998, he made a comment on CNN - what it was is not material here - that I considered beyond the pale. I decided I could henceforth do without his opinions and insights. He impressed me as a distinctly disagreeable man. And that was well before he outed CIA operative Valerie Plame. When the news broke recently that Mr. Novak had a brain tumor and would retire, I was not made prostrate by grief. What I felt was that whisper of common mortality, that sense of there-but-for-the-grace-of-God one usually feels when tragedy strikes someone who is known to you, but not too closely.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 9, 1998
YOU'D think President Clinton had nominated Johnnie Cochran as attorney general.Instead, speaking during his recent sojourn to Africa, the president said only this: "Going back to the time before we were even a nation, European Americans received the fruits of the slave trade. And we were wrong in that."I thought it an unremarkable -- and unassailable -- statement. Silly me.Conservative observers, including George Will, Patrick Buchanan and Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, have pronounced themselves scandalized by what they apparently see as a crucifixion of national pride on a cross of red, black and green.
NEWS
By RICHARD B. SCHMITT and RICHARD B. SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As chief of staff to one of the most powerful figures on Earth, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby was immersed in some of the most sensitive and weighty matters affecting the nation. Now Libby is seeking to use the profundity of his former responsibilities as a mitigating factor as he prepares for a criminal trial in the unmasking of former CIA operative Valerie Plame. Libby contends that any alleged lack of truth-telling was inadvertent, the product of his own preoccupation with life-and-death matters of state.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The following dialogue between Byron York of National Review and Jeff Lomonaco of the University of Minnesota on the fallout from the I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby trial originally appeared on www.latimes.com. Jeff, In the wake of the Libby guilty verdicts, many Democrats are talking about the Bush administration's finally being held accountable for lying the nation into war, and there's also talk of further "accountability" in the form of possible congressional hearings. But I want to elaborate a little on the extraordinary degree to which the Bush administration, allegedly engaged in some sort of cover-up of its misdeeds, actually cooperated with the CIA leak investigation.
NEWS
By RICHARD B. SCHMITT and RICHARD B. SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As chief of staff to one of the most powerful figures on Earth, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby was immersed in some of the most sensitive and weighty matters affecting the nation. Now Libby is seeking to use the profundity of his former responsibilities as a mitigating factor as he prepares for a criminal trial in the unmasking of former CIA operative Valerie Plame. Libby contends that any alleged lack of truth-telling was inadvertent, the product of his own preoccupation with life-and-death matters of state.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
Bob Woodward, one of the country's most celebrated reporters and an assistant managing editor at The Washington Post, apologized yesterday to his editor for having waited more than two years before revealing that a White House official disclosed to him in 2003 the identity of CIA agent Valerie Plame. Woodward, who with Carl Bernstein helped to unearth the Watergate scandal that brought down the presidency of Richard M. Nixon, testified Monday under oath about his role in the Plame case.
NEWS
August 27, 2005
On August 22, 2005, RUTH ANNJACKSON (nee Novak), dearest wife of the late Robert A. Jackson, devoted mother of Bonnie L. Werner and husband Jerry, dear sister of Robert Novak, loving grandmother of Jerry L. Werner and Stacey A. Brack, and husband Ronnie. Beloved great grandmother of Allie, Jake, and Mattie Brack. Also survived by other loving relatives and friends. Family invites friends to call at the Charles L. Stevens Funeral Home, Inc., 1501 E. Fort Avenue, Locust Point, MD, on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held at the Church of the Redemption on Saturday at 11 A.M. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Avoiding a clash over the First Amendment and possibly jail time, a reporter for Time has given a deposition to a prosecutor investigating the disclosure of the identity of a CIA operative, the magazine said yesterday. The reporter, Matthew Cooper, had been ordered by a federal judge to respond to questions posed by Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the special counsel investigating whether the Bush administration illegally leaked the CIA agent's name. Shortly after Fitzgerald interviewed Cooper on Monday, U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan lifted the contempt citation he had issued against the reporter.
NEWS
October 14, 2003
Chavez's attack on Wilson hides the real issues Linda Chavez suggests that when Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV's wife made a political contribution, she exposed the company that she worked for as a CIA front ("Basking in the spotlight of the leak scandal," Opinion * Commentary, Oct. 9). What a partisan and unethical distortion of the truth. Valerie Plame, a very high-level CIA agent, was exposed in print by super-patriotic, right-wing journalist Robert Novak. He admits that this information came from highly placed members of the Bush administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2002
The ever-considerate Maryland Film Festival 2002 organizers have made it easy for those planning to attend this year's festivities from the very beginning: As of press time, there was only one movie scheduled for a 10 a.m. start time. But what a movie it is. If you've never seen Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, and wonder why people still talk about this 60-year-old film as if it were the greatest movie ever made, by all means get an early start this morning and see it. Watch as the 26-year-old Welles plays with what he called the best toy-train set a boy ever had -- experimenting, playing against convention, making a film like no one else had ever seen before.
NEWS
October 14, 2003
Chavez's attack on Wilson hides the real issues Linda Chavez suggests that when Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV's wife made a political contribution, she exposed the company that she worked for as a CIA front ("Basking in the spotlight of the leak scandal," Opinion * Commentary, Oct. 9). What a partisan and unethical distortion of the truth. Valerie Plame, a very high-level CIA agent, was exposed in print by super-patriotic, right-wing journalist Robert Novak. He admits that this information came from highly placed members of the Bush administration.
NEWS
April 3, 2003
On March 30, 2003, REGINA NOVAK (nee Wajbel), age 94, of Orlando, FL, formerly of Baltimore, MD. She was a member of St. Casimir's Church. Beloved wife of the late Adam P. Novak, Sr. Devoted mother of Delores Nagrabski and her husband Steve, Robert Novak and his wife Sally and the late Adam P. Jr. Dear sister of Raymond and Amiel Wajbel. Loving grandmother of Steve and Richard Nagrabski and Robert, Jr. and James Novak. Also survived by four great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2002
The ever-considerate Maryland Film Festival 2002 organizers have made it easy for those planning to attend this year's festivities from the very beginning: As of press time, there was only one movie scheduled for a 10 a.m. start time. But what a movie it is. If you've never seen Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, and wonder why people still talk about this 60-year-old film as if it were the greatest movie ever made, by all means get an early start this morning and see it. Watch as the 26-year-old Welles plays with what he called the best toy-train set a boy ever had -- experimenting, playing against convention, making a film like no one else had ever seen before.
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