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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
When movie tough guy Robert Mitchum died July 2, news stories announcing his death listed his birthplace as Bridgeport, Conn.However, according to a 1948 story in The Sun, Mitchum, the son of a railroader, was born in the Cecil County town of Rising Sun:"Hollywood, Sept 1 (AP) -- Robert Mitchum, screen player, and two actresses left jail under $1,000 bond each today after their arrest earlier in a narcotic raid on a Laurel canyon home."Mitchum along with actress Lila Leeds, 20; dancer Vickie Evans, 25, and Robert Ford, a real estate man, were booked on suspicion of violating state and Federal narcotics laws after police said they broke in on a marijuana smoking party in the girls' home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
If you didn't get enough romance on Valentine's Day, that's OK -- it's the subject of several new DVD releases. These "romantic" films include classics from the 1960s through the 1980s and more recent releases that didn't quite get the chemistry right. Keep a box of tissue within reach for Breakfast at Tiffany's (Paramount, $20), which is celebrating its 45th anniversary. Audrey Hepburn received an Oscar nomination for her indelible performance as Holly Golightly, a free-spirited woman who works as a high-priced escort in New York City.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 15, 1991
DIRECTOR Martin Scorsese, who has tried just about every film genre and done well with them, goes for the horror film this time with ''Cape Fear.''He does rather well with it, too, but "Cape Fear" is still a horror film. It isn't in the same category as the ''Friday the 13'' or the ''Elm Street'' movies, but at times it's close enough.A remake of the 1962 film starring Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum (who do small roles in the remake), ''Cape Fear'' takes place in Florida where an attorney is menaced by a former client, a man who has served 14 years for rape and battery.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 3, 1998
There were several low points to 1997. The death of Princess Diana was probably the lowest, but for movie fans the summer was especially rough. Within two days two film giants were lost: Robert Mitchum and James Stewart.Mitchum died July 1 at the age of 79, Stewart on July 2 at age 89. They may well have been the last two actors who reminded us of the era when movie-going was fun.If you're old enough, you remember those days. Most movie theaters weren't in malls. They were within walking distance, right in your own neighborhood.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 3, 1998
There were several low points to 1997. The death of Princess Diana was probably the lowest, but for movie fans the summer was especially rough. Within two days two film giants were lost: Robert Mitchum and James Stewart.Mitchum died July 1 at the age of 79, Stewart on July 2 at age 89. They may well have been the last two actors who reminded us of the era when movie-going was fun.If you're old enough, you remember those days. Most movie theaters weren't in malls. They were within walking distance, right in your own neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times News Service | November 10, 1991
New York -- When Gregory Peck, playing the upright lawyer Sam Bowden in the 1962 thriller "Cape Fear," proclaims the ex-con Max Cady a "shocking degenerate," Robert Mitchum, playing Cady, simply laughs. With sociopathic glee he has stalked the Bowdens, a stalwart husband, white-gloved wife and innocent daughter who represent an early-'60s vision of clean-cut American life."I must say I hoped that Max would've killed them," observes Martin Scorsese, who has just remade "Cape Fear" in his own turbulent fashion, one that has absolutely nothing to do with the earlier film's white-picket-fence world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
If you didn't get enough romance on Valentine's Day, that's OK -- it's the subject of several new DVD releases. These "romantic" films include classics from the 1960s through the 1980s and more recent releases that didn't quite get the chemistry right. Keep a box of tissue within reach for Breakfast at Tiffany's (Paramount, $20), which is celebrating its 45th anniversary. Audrey Hepburn received an Oscar nomination for her indelible performance as Holly Golightly, a free-spirited woman who works as a high-priced escort in New York City.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 2, 1993
There's a moment in the soon-to-arrive youth anthem "Bodies, Rest & Motion" when Nick, footloose and fancy-dead, stops at a gas station late at night after a fruitless search for his past (and possibly, therefore, his future) and notices an easy rider on a motorcycle refueling, heavy with purpose.It's a majestic movie moment, because it says so much about generations heading in opposite directions without making much contact. It's made all the more poignant by the fact that one of the things Nick is fleeing is his girlfriend, Beth, who is played by Bridget Fonda, the avatar of "Generation X," that group of disaffected twentysomethings attracting so much media attention of late.
NEWS
February 8, 2003
Peter Shaw, 84, a producer and former agent married to actress Angela Lansbury, died in Los Angeles Jan. 29. Born in Reading, England, Mr. Shaw served in the British army during World War II. After his discharge, he was signed to a contract by MGM Studios, where he met Ms. Lansbury. The couple were married in London in 1949. He worked as an agent for William Morris, representing such actors as Robert Mitchum, Katharine Hepburn and Anna Magnani. He worked at MGM again in the 1960s as assistant head of production before returning to William Morris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | April 16, 1998
The director William Castle is best known for such horror classics as "The Tingler" and "The House on Haunted Hill." Less well known is "When Strangers Marry," his 1944 film starring Kim Hunter as a young wife whose new husband (Dean Jagger) may have strangled a man.This classic film noir - which co-stars Robert Mitchum as a former TC beau of the newlywed - will be shown at the Charles Theatre on Saturday and again on Monday. Not on video, and not to be missed!The movie will be shown at the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., Saturday at 11:30 a.m. and Monday at 7:30 p.m. as part of the "B Film" series.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
When movie tough guy Robert Mitchum died July 2, news stories announcing his death listed his birthplace as Bridgeport, Conn.However, according to a 1948 story in The Sun, Mitchum, the son of a railroader, was born in the Cecil County town of Rising Sun:"Hollywood, Sept 1 (AP) -- Robert Mitchum, screen player, and two actresses left jail under $1,000 bond each today after their arrest earlier in a narcotic raid on a Laurel canyon home."Mitchum along with actress Lila Leeds, 20; dancer Vickie Evans, 25, and Robert Ford, a real estate man, were booked on suspicion of violating state and Federal narcotics laws after police said they broke in on a marijuana smoking party in the girls' home.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 2, 1993
There's a moment in the soon-to-arrive youth anthem "Bodies, Rest & Motion" when Nick, footloose and fancy-dead, stops at a gas station late at night after a fruitless search for his past (and possibly, therefore, his future) and notices an easy rider on a motorcycle refueling, heavy with purpose.It's a majestic movie moment, because it says so much about generations heading in opposite directions without making much contact. It's made all the more poignant by the fact that one of the things Nick is fleeing is his girlfriend, Beth, who is played by Bridget Fonda, the avatar of "Generation X," that group of disaffected twentysomethings attracting so much media attention of late.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 15, 1991
DIRECTOR Martin Scorsese, who has tried just about every film genre and done well with them, goes for the horror film this time with ''Cape Fear.''He does rather well with it, too, but "Cape Fear" is still a horror film. It isn't in the same category as the ''Friday the 13'' or the ''Elm Street'' movies, but at times it's close enough.A remake of the 1962 film starring Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum (who do small roles in the remake), ''Cape Fear'' takes place in Florida where an attorney is menaced by a former client, a man who has served 14 years for rape and battery.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times News Service | November 10, 1991
New York -- When Gregory Peck, playing the upright lawyer Sam Bowden in the 1962 thriller "Cape Fear," proclaims the ex-con Max Cady a "shocking degenerate," Robert Mitchum, playing Cady, simply laughs. With sociopathic glee he has stalked the Bowdens, a stalwart husband, white-gloved wife and innocent daughter who represent an early-'60s vision of clean-cut American life."I must say I hoped that Max would've killed them," observes Martin Scorsese, who has just remade "Cape Fear" in his own turbulent fashion, one that has absolutely nothing to do with the earlier film's white-picket-fence world.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | April 25, 1991
THE SWEEP MONTH of May means new episodes of series and a bunch of other highly promoted shows in addition to "Switched at Birth" and "Dinosaurs." Here are a few highlights:Sunday: "Shadow of a Doubt" (CBS) Hallmark Hall of Fame re-make of 1943 Hitchcock classic with Mark Harmon and Diane Ladd.May 3: "Dallas" (CBS) The venerable series that gave birth to the prime-time soap ends its run with a two-hour final episode.May 5: "Night of the Hunter" (ABC) Richard Chamberlain takes over the Robert Mitchum role from the 1955 movie in another re-make.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | February 5, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- "Cape Fear" was considered strong stuff fo its suggestions of sexual violence when released in 1962. Now, the script for director Martin Scorsese's remake appears to be the blueprint for an even more lurid picture.The original revolved around a sadistic ex-con terrorizing the man whose testimony sent him to prison for rape.Directed by J. Lee Thompson, the film's then-shocking scenes featured Robert Mitchum as the psychopath, taunting Gregory Peck by expressing lust for Peck's wife (Polly Bergen)
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