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Robert Mcnamara

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By Henry Trewhitt | February 7, 1993
PROMISE AND POWER:THE LIFE AND TIMESOF ROBERT MCNAMARA.Deborah Shapley.Little, Brown.` 734 pages. $29.95.Even today, at 76, Robert Strange McNamara darts among us, eyes fixed on the goal of the moment with a combination of candor, ambiguity and, his enemies claim, deceit. For that matter, his friends, acknowledging the record, say the same things.But the duplicity of RSM -- those famous initials -- is more complex than that. Today's goal, whatever it is, may repudiate a position he argued with passion 30 years ago or 10 years ago. Anyone, you say, may change positions honorably as time reveals truth.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 5, 2014
President Obama's firing of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, transparently dressed up as a resignation under congressional pressure, seemed somehow out of character for a chief executive known for patience and dislike of wielding the knife. The retired Army general and Vietnam combat veteran had matched Mr. Obama's own style of cautious deliberation in coping with the VA scandal that left thousands of patients waiting interminable months for medical treatment, some even dying while they waited.
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 19, 1995
Washington -- TO ME, the most compelling passage in Robert McNamara's 30-years-later "mea culpa" over Vietnam is this one:"I had never visited Indochina, nor did I understand or appreciate its history, language, culture or values. The same must be said, to varying degrees, about President Kennedy, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, National Security Adviser McGeorge Bundy . . . When it came to Vietnam, we found ourselves setting policy for a region that was terra incognita."Worse, our government lacked experts for us to consult to compensate for our ignorance . . . There were no senior officials in the Pentagon or State Department with . . . knowledge of Southeast Asia.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 12, 2009
I get press releases about new books all the time. This one arrived the other day: "A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers ... a fly-on-the-wall, insider look at the mad house that Lehman became. It will reveal never-before-told stories about the dark characters who ruled Lehman, refusing to heed warnings that the company was headed for an iceberg." The author is Lawrence G. McDonald, until its collapse "one of Lehman's most consistently profitable traders" and an "eyewitness" to the brewing mess inside the investment bank.
NEWS
By James Fallows | April 18, 1995
AS A RULE I believe it is never too late to say you're sorry and that people who admit error deserve forgiveness and warmth. But I'm having a hard time with that policy in the face of Robert McNamara's revelation that the Vietnam War was a mistake. The many people who know Mr. McNamara in Washington, as I do not, say that he has been tormented by the war and is making a brave attempt to deal with his legacy. Maybe so, but there is a difference between Robert McNamara and all the other people damaged by this war -- the 58,000 Americans and countless Vietnamese who lost their lives, the millions in America who lost loved ones, or hope, or belief in country, because of the war. Those such as Sen. Robert Kerrey, D-Neb.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
Brian VanDeMark has spent more than two years teaching midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy about the Vietnam War. Now he is taking part in writing one of its most eagerly awaited chapters.Every two weeks or so, the 33-year-old professor turns on a tape recorder and assists in the autobiography of the prime architect of that conflict: former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara, one of the last leading figures to be heard from.With his slicked back hair and wireless glasses, Mr. McNamara became a familiar symbol of America's involvement in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 16, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- From the campus chapel high on a hill overlooking U.S. 1, you can gaze tenderly down to the spot between the University of Maryland Book Store and the place that used to be Albrecht's Pharmacy where the tear gas wafted through the balmy spring air and stopped all oxygen from entering my lungs.It was my pathetic little piece of the war that was Robert McNamara's and Robert Dornan's and, for that matter, Bill tTC Clinton's. U.S. 1 was spilling over that afternoon. There were college kids furiously protesting the fighting in Vietnam, and College Park residents furiously protesting the kids, and uniformed State Police and National Guard troops shooting their tear gas all around.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 12, 2009
I get press releases about new books all the time. This one arrived the other day: "A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers ... a fly-on-the-wall, insider look at the mad house that Lehman became. It will reveal never-before-told stories about the dark characters who ruled Lehman, refusing to heed warnings that the company was headed for an iceberg." The author is Lawrence G. McDonald, until its collapse "one of Lehman's most consistently profitable traders" and an "eyewitness" to the brewing mess inside the investment bank.
NEWS
May 11, 1995
Precious LibertiesI realize that I am one lone voice among the rising chorus calling for action in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing, but I oppose the new expansive powers being proposed for the FBI and other federal agencies.The thought of giving up some of our precious liberties frightens me more than a thousand mad bombers.We seem to have a permanent disease in this country called "short-term memoryitis." We forget our history and the history of other countries so easily.The aggrandizement of power in a centralized authority has always led to the inevitable abuse of such power.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
When former Defense Secretary Robert McNamara admitted this spring that the Vietnam War had been a mistake, editorial cartoonist Jack Ohman went after him with pens blazing.Mr. Ohman, cartoonist for The Oregonian in Portland, drew a grim-faced Mr. McNamara crying bomb-shaped tears.Cartoons like these have been helping to shape political debate in this country for more than two centuries. Designed to enrage and provoke, they've skewered everyone from King George III to Bill Clinton, targeting hypocrisy and making politicians squirm whenever possible.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
When former Defense Secretary Robert McNamara admitted this spring that the Vietnam War had been a mistake, editorial cartoonist Jack Ohman went after him with pens blazing.Mr. Ohman, cartoonist for The Oregonian in Portland, drew a grim-faced Mr. McNamara crying bomb-shaped tears.Cartoons like these have been helping to shape political debate in this country for more than two centuries. Designed to enrage and provoke, they've skewered everyone from King George III to Bill Clinton, targeting hypocrisy and making politicians squirm whenever possible.
NEWS
May 11, 1995
Precious LibertiesI realize that I am one lone voice among the rising chorus calling for action in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing, but I oppose the new expansive powers being proposed for the FBI and other federal agencies.The thought of giving up some of our precious liberties frightens me more than a thousand mad bombers.We seem to have a permanent disease in this country called "short-term memoryitis." We forget our history and the history of other countries so easily.The aggrandizement of power in a centralized authority has always led to the inevitable abuse of such power.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 19, 1995
Washington -- TO ME, the most compelling passage in Robert McNamara's 30-years-later "mea culpa" over Vietnam is this one:"I had never visited Indochina, nor did I understand or appreciate its history, language, culture or values. The same must be said, to varying degrees, about President Kennedy, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, National Security Adviser McGeorge Bundy . . . When it came to Vietnam, we found ourselves setting policy for a region that was terra incognita."Worse, our government lacked experts for us to consult to compensate for our ignorance . . . There were no senior officials in the Pentagon or State Department with . . . knowledge of Southeast Asia.
NEWS
By James Fallows | April 18, 1995
AS A RULE I believe it is never too late to say you're sorry and that people who admit error deserve forgiveness and warmth. But I'm having a hard time with that policy in the face of Robert McNamara's revelation that the Vietnam War was a mistake. The many people who know Mr. McNamara in Washington, as I do not, say that he has been tormented by the war and is making a brave attempt to deal with his legacy. Maybe so, but there is a difference between Robert McNamara and all the other people damaged by this war -- the 58,000 Americans and countless Vietnamese who lost their lives, the millions in America who lost loved ones, or hope, or belief in country, because of the war. Those such as Sen. Robert Kerrey, D-Neb.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 16, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- From the campus chapel high on a hill overlooking U.S. 1, you can gaze tenderly down to the spot between the University of Maryland Book Store and the place that used to be Albrecht's Pharmacy where the tear gas wafted through the balmy spring air and stopped all oxygen from entering my lungs.It was my pathetic little piece of the war that was Robert McNamara's and Robert Dornan's and, for that matter, Bill tTC Clinton's. U.S. 1 was spilling over that afternoon. There were college kids furiously protesting the fighting in Vietnam, and College Park residents furiously protesting the kids, and uniformed State Police and National Guard troops shooting their tear gas all around.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
Brian VanDeMark has spent more than two years teaching midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy about the Vietnam War. Now he is taking part in writing one of its most eagerly awaited chapters.Every two weeks or so, the 33-year-old professor turns on a tape recorder and assists in the autobiography of the prime architect of that conflict: former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara, one of the last leading figures to be heard from.With his slicked back hair and wireless glasses, Mr. McNamara became a familiar symbol of America's involvement in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 5, 2014
President Obama's firing of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, transparently dressed up as a resignation under congressional pressure, seemed somehow out of character for a chief executive known for patience and dislike of wielding the knife. The retired Army general and Vietnam combat veteran had matched Mr. Obama's own style of cautious deliberation in coping with the VA scandal that left thousands of patients waiting interminable months for medical treatment, some even dying while they waited.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
Dearest Anne:For weeks even months I have been praying only that I be shown what I must do. This morning with no warning I was Shown as clearly as I was shown that Friday night in August, 1955, that you would be my wife. ... And like Abraham, I dare not go without my child. Know that I love thee but must act. ...NormanOn the last afternoon of his life Norman R. Morrison stopped somewhere between Baltimore and Washington to mail a letter to his wife.The evening rush hour was in full swing that chilly Tuesday on Nov. 2, 1965, when Norman, driving an old, borrowed Cadillac with his infant daughter behind him in a car crib and a gallon jug of kerosene beside him in a wicker picnic basket, paused briefly to post the handwritten, one-page letter.
NEWS
By Henry Trewhitt | February 7, 1993
PROMISE AND POWER:THE LIFE AND TIMESOF ROBERT MCNAMARA.Deborah Shapley.Little, Brown.` 734 pages. $29.95.Even today, at 76, Robert Strange McNamara darts among us, eyes fixed on the goal of the moment with a combination of candor, ambiguity and, his enemies claim, deceit. For that matter, his friends, acknowledging the record, say the same things.But the duplicity of RSM -- those famous initials -- is more complex than that. Today's goal, whatever it is, may repudiate a position he argued with passion 30 years ago or 10 years ago. Anyone, you say, may change positions honorably as time reveals truth.
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