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Robert Maxwell

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 8, 2002
I first met Robert Maxwell in 1990 in London, where I was working as executive editor of the Sunday Correspondent, a smart startup national weekly paper that was gunned down in the crossfire of an advertising recession and ferocious competition. There was talk of his investing in it, but his well-established notoriety as a sleazy financial operator and an arrogant tyrant blocked that. I next met him in New York, when at the end of a brutal, violent strike, the Daily News -- of which I was editorial page editor -- collapsed financially and was sold, for essentially nothing, to Maxwell.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 8, 2002
I first met Robert Maxwell in 1990 in London, where I was working as executive editor of the Sunday Correspondent, a smart startup national weekly paper that was gunned down in the crossfire of an advertising recession and ferocious competition. There was talk of his investing in it, but his well-established notoriety as a sleazy financial operator and an arrogant tyrant blocked that. I next met him in New York, when at the end of a brutal, violent strike, the Daily News -- of which I was editorial page editor -- collapsed financially and was sold, for essentially nothing, to Maxwell.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1991
LONDON -- The day after Robert Maxwell was found dead in the waters off the Canary Islands in early November, his newspaper, the Daily Mirror, surrendered all pretense of journalistic dispassion and turned itself over to eulogizing its departed owner.What the Mirror's efforts lacked in sincerity was made up in volume. Nearly every article -- and there were many -- sang the praises of the ruddy and rotund press lord. He was, according to the front page headline, "The Man Who Saved The Daily Mirror" by buying it some years earlier when it was on the brink of collapse.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1992
LONDON -- Two sons of the late, discredited financier Robert Maxwell were charged formally yesterday with conspiracy to defraud others of millions of dollars.Ian Maxwell, 36, and Kevin Maxwell, 33, along with their American financial adviser, Larry Trachtenberg, spent several hours in a London police station after their arrest early yesterday. Kevin Maxwell and Mr. Trachtenberg also were charged with theft. They were released after posting a combined bail of more than $1 million.The indictments were the latest development in the evolving Maxwell scandal, which has unraveled since the autocratic head of the family disappeared off his yacht at sea in November.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 7, 1991
Louisiana is so un-American, they don't even hold their election on Election Day.Wofford carried Pennsylvania for national health insurance. Now all he has to do is deliver national health insurance.Whoever thought we'd live to say, 'Save the Soviet Union!'?The industry is trying to figure out how many papers went down with Robert Maxwell.
NEWS
March 21, 1992
One Picasso lost, 3 Picassos foundThree late Picasso drawings taken from a Marseille museum in 1990 were recovered by police in Paris, but an important early oil painting was stolen from a museum in Grenoble, the French Culture Ministry said yesterday."
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1992
LONDON -- Two sons of the late, discredited financier Robert Maxwell were charged formally yesterday with conspiracy to defraud others of millions of dollars.Ian Maxwell, 36, and Kevin Maxwell, 33, along with their American financial adviser, Larry Trachtenberg, spent several hours in a London police station after their arrest early yesterday. Kevin Maxwell and Mr. Trachtenberg also were charged with theft. They were released after posting a combined bail of more than $1 million.The indictments were the latest development in the evolving Maxwell scandal, which has unraveled since the autocratic head of the family disappeared off his yacht at sea in November.
BUSINESS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | December 10, 1991
LONDON (AP) -- Trouble at Robert Maxwell's wrecked media empire deepened yesterday with word that bank lenders couldn't find more than half the $1.2 billion in missing money he had frantically shuffled before his death.Mr. Maxwell's two sons, Kevin and Ian, also were hurled deeper into the confusing jumble of events with the disclosure that a court had seized their passports and impounded assets to assure their help in finding the missing money.Mr. Maxwell, one of the world's most flamboyant publishers, apparently used the money to help mask the weakness of his far-flung web of indebted companies, which range from tabloid newspapers to scholastic publishers.
BUSINESS
By Craig R. Whitney and Craig R. Whitney,New York Times News Service | February 22, 1992
LONDON -- Lloyd's of London, the British underwriter of a $36 million accident insurance policy on Robert Maxwell, said yesterday that it did not intend to pay the policy because its investigators had concluded that he probably committed suicide.Mr. Maxwell's body was found floating in the Atlantic Ocean near the Canary Islands Nov. 5. At the time, his media and publishing empire was collapsing under a burden of debt and apparent fraud.He left an international business empire with more than $4 billion in debts.
NEWS
March 1, 2003
On February 27, 2003; ORA NAOMI (nee Dodd); beloved wife of the late Robert E. Maxwell; loving daughter of Loma Ferrell and the late Carey Dodd; devoted mother of Lynn Johnston, Patricia McMullen, Carl Maxwell, Pam Griffith and the late Rhonda Hylton; loving grandmother of Linda Hargrove, Robert Bird, Ryan Maxwell and Brandon McMullen; and great-grandmother of Jessica, Casey and Brianna. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Road (Perry Hall)
NEWS
March 21, 1992
One Picasso lost, 3 Picassos foundThree late Picasso drawings taken from a Marseille museum in 1990 were recovered by police in Paris, but an important early oil painting was stolen from a museum in Grenoble, the French Culture Ministry said yesterday."
BUSINESS
By Craig R. Whitney and Craig R. Whitney,New York Times News Service | February 22, 1992
LONDON -- Lloyd's of London, the British underwriter of a $36 million accident insurance policy on Robert Maxwell, said yesterday that it did not intend to pay the policy because its investigators had concluded that he probably committed suicide.Mr. Maxwell's body was found floating in the Atlantic Ocean near the Canary Islands Nov. 5. At the time, his media and publishing empire was collapsing under a burden of debt and apparent fraud.He left an international business empire with more than $4 billion in debts.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1991
LONDON -- The day after Robert Maxwell was found dead in the waters off the Canary Islands in early November, his newspaper, the Daily Mirror, surrendered all pretense of journalistic dispassion and turned itself over to eulogizing its departed owner.What the Mirror's efforts lacked in sincerity was made up in volume. Nearly every article -- and there were many -- sang the praises of the ruddy and rotund press lord. He was, according to the front page headline, "The Man Who Saved The Daily Mirror" by buying it some years earlier when it was on the brink of collapse.
BUSINESS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | December 10, 1991
LONDON (AP) -- Trouble at Robert Maxwell's wrecked media empire deepened yesterday with word that bank lenders couldn't find more than half the $1.2 billion in missing money he had frantically shuffled before his death.Mr. Maxwell's two sons, Kevin and Ian, also were hurled deeper into the confusing jumble of events with the disclosure that a court had seized their passports and impounded assets to assure their help in finding the missing money.Mr. Maxwell, one of the world's most flamboyant publishers, apparently used the money to help mask the weakness of his far-flung web of indebted companies, which range from tabloid newspapers to scholastic publishers.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 7, 1991
Louisiana is so un-American, they don't even hold their election on Election Day.Wofford carried Pennsylvania for national health insurance. Now all he has to do is deliver national health insurance.Whoever thought we'd live to say, 'Save the Soviet Union!'?The industry is trying to figure out how many papers went down with Robert Maxwell.
BUSINESS
By Newsday | March 18, 1991
NEW YORK -- The Daily News pressmen yesterday became the third union to vote to approve a contract with British publisher Robert Maxwell while the tabloid's editorial workers debated the wisdom of signing a contract that slashes jobs but saves the paper.The pressmen overwhelmingly voted for a settlement that will mean the loss of nearly half their 400 jobs. The photoengravers and the machinists unions already have approved their contracts and the rank and file of the remaining six unions are expected to vote this week.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee | April 5, 1991
The battle is about to begin between Daily Racing Form and its new competitor, Racing Times.Racing Times will begin publishing a past-performance paper April 13. The publication will be sold in major markets, including Maryland, before expanding its availability throughout the country.Racing Times is owned by Robert Maxwell, publishing adversary to Rupert Murdoch, who owns the Form. The pair already has a past-performance war going in England, where Murdoch started Racing Post as a challenger to Maxwell's long-established Sporting Life.
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