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Robert Mapplethorpe

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By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A former songwriter for "Captain Kangaroo" told jurors in the Robert Mapplethorpe obscenity trial yesterday that the photographer's sexually explicit works should not be displayed in museums because they promote sadomasochism and sexual abuse of children.Mass media analyst Judith Reisman was permitted to testify in the case against the Contemporary Arts Center and director Dennis Barrie over the objections of defense attorneys, who challenged her ability to evaluate either art or obscenity.
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NEWS
By James Gardner and James Gardner,Special to the Sun | May 21, 1995
Robert Mapplethorpe is synonymous with the major cultural conflict of our day, though he died a month before battle was joined and he never suspected it was coming. Ever since the cancellation in 1989 of a retrospective of his photographs at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, opinion about him has been divided into two camps: There are those who believe that he was obscene and should have been censored and those who believed that he was not obscene and should not have been censored.In fact, the truth lies in the middle: he was obscene and he should not be censored.
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NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 29, 1990
CINCINNATI -- Defense attorneys for a Cincinnati art museum charged with pandering obscenity told a jury yesterday that Robert Mapplethorpe's photographic exploration of the gay underground was artistic and politically important -- no matter how disturbing the homoerotic images might be to them.Even though the controversial photographs reflect a "world many of us could never conceive of being part of," attorney H. Louis Sirkin said in his opening statement in the landmark trial, they represent an artistic record by a "brilliant photographer" of the gay "underground."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 21, 1995
Although Robert Mapplethorpe is considered one of the finest photographers of his generation by curators and art historians, his openly homosexual lifestyle, his photographs of male nudes and male sexual acts, and his death at 42 of AIDS in 1989 have stirred controversy wherever his name arises.Mapplethorpe's work is notable for its classical beauty, but many can only think of him as a degenerate and his art as pornography.An exhibition opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art on Wednesday seeks to establish a more balanced perspective on Mapplethorpe by comparing his work to that of one of the century's leading photographers, Edward Weston.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A four-man, four-woman jury was selected yesterday to hear a landmark obscenity case involving the sexually explicit photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe.Their first order of business today: to visit the scene of the alleged crime.Defense attorneys said they hope to show jurors the art gallery where "Robert Mapplethorpe: A Perfect Moment" was on exhibit last spring, drawing record crowds.The Contemporary Arts Center and its director, Dennis Barrie, were indicted on misdemeanor charges of pandering obscenity and using minors in nude photos the day the controversial retrospective opened.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 2, 1990
CINCINNATI---After six days of hearing about Robert Mapplethorpe's sexually explicit photographs,jurors in the landmark obscenity case finally got their first look yesterday at what all the fuss is aboutIf lead prosecutor Frank Prouty had hoped for stormy indignation as the homoerotic photos were passed from juror to juror,hed didn't get itJurors were impassive,taking just a few seconds each to review the controversial photographsThe slow-moving trial,which today...
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 4, 1990
CINCINNATI -- The director of a Cincinnati art museum defended Robert Mapplethorpe's sexually explicit photographs against charges of obscenity yesterday while acknowledging that some observers might find them "disgusting to look at."Contemporary Arts Center Director Dennis Barrie, testifying in the first obscenity case ever brought against a U.S. museum, told jurors he gladly brought the controversial exhibition to Cincinnati, where museum officials had "every right and every reason" to show it.Mr.
NEWS
By James Gardner and James Gardner,Special to the Sun | May 21, 1995
Robert Mapplethorpe is synonymous with the major cultural conflict of our day, though he died a month before battle was joined and he never suspected it was coming. Ever since the cancellation in 1989 of a retrospective of his photographs at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, opinion about him has been divided into two camps: There are those who believe that he was obscene and should have been censored and those who believed that he was not obscene and should not have been censored.In fact, the truth lies in the middle: he was obscene and he should not be censored.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 21, 1995
Although Robert Mapplethorpe is considered one of the finest photographers of his generation by curators and art historians, his openly homosexual lifestyle, his photographs of male nudes and male sexual acts, and his death at 42 of AIDS in 1989 have stirred controversy wherever his name arises.Mapplethorpe's work is notable for its classical beauty, but many can only think of him as a degenerate and his art as pornography.An exhibition opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art on Wednesday seeks to establish a more balanced perspective on Mapplethorpe by comparing his work to that of one of the century's leading photographers, Edward Weston.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | December 2, 1990
Washington--A WELL-KNOWN arbiter of popular culture has tut-tutted me for rashly saying hardly anybody who reads this page ever heard of Milli Vanilli before M.V. was exposed as a fraud.''Speak for yourself, Ernest,'' he suggested, which is what all my closest friends call me and what I always do, to my wife's frequent chagrin.(Actually, no one calls me that: Ernest is an honorific awarded me at birth and never heard again until the night some stodgy editor decided without asking that it would be my byline in The Baltimore Sun. The day I decide to cast off this burdensome disguise I will change my byline back to Pat, which is whom I really have spoken for all these years.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 26, 1992
It sounds like an art gallery's dream come true.The Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick is currently showing the most topical and most popular art exhibit since it opened in 1986. Instead of the usual quilts or landscapes, "Right Down to the Roots" deals with such subjects as homeless women, race relations, the Gulf War and the Holocaust.Instead of the usual desultory attendance -- an average of maybe 25 to 30 people a day -- 800 people saw the show the first two days it was open.And they were involved.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | December 2, 1990
Washington--A WELL-KNOWN arbiter of popular culture has tut-tutted me for rashly saying hardly anybody who reads this page ever heard of Milli Vanilli before M.V. was exposed as a fraud.''Speak for yourself, Ernest,'' he suggested, which is what all my closest friends call me and what I always do, to my wife's frequent chagrin.(Actually, no one calls me that: Ernest is an honorific awarded me at birth and never heard again until the night some stodgy editor decided without asking that it would be my byline in The Baltimore Sun. The day I decide to cast off this burdensome disguise I will change my byline back to Pat, which is whom I really have spoken for all these years.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 7, 1990
CINCINNATI -- If Jennifer Loesing never hears Robert Mapplethorpe's name again, it will be too soon. And as far as the photographer's sexually explicit photographs are concerned, Mrs. Loesing can only say: "Gross."But the 29-year-old X-ray technician said she and seven other jurors acquitted a Cincinnati museum and its director of obscenity charges on Friday because, as much as they were repulsed by the homoerotic images, jurors were convinced the photographs had artistic merit."We all agreed they were gross -- I think most people would find them so," Mrs. Loesing said yesterday.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent Tom Kavanagh of The Sun's features staff contributed to this article | October 6, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A Cincinnati art museum and its director were acquitted yesterday of charges of obscenity for displaying the sexually explicit photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe."
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A former songwriter for "Captain Kangaroo" told jurors in the Robert Mapplethorpe obscenity trial yesterday that the photographer's sexually explicit works should not be displayed in museums because they promote sadomasochism and sexual abuse of children.Mass media analyst Judith Reisman was permitted to testify in the case against the Contemporary Arts Center and director Dennis Barrie over the objections of defense attorneys, who challenged her ability to evaluate either art or obscenity.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 4, 1990
CINCINNATI -- The director of a Cincinnati art museum defended Robert Mapplethorpe's sexually explicit photographs against charges of obscenity yesterday while acknowledging that some observers might find them "disgusting to look at."Contemporary Arts Center Director Dennis Barrie, testifying in the first obscenity case ever brought against a U.S. museum, told jurors he gladly brought the controversial exhibition to Cincinnati, where museum officials had "every right and every reason" to show it.Mr.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent Tom Kavanagh of The Sun's features staff contributed to this article | October 6, 1990
CINCINNATI -- A Cincinnati art museum and its director were acquitted yesterday of charges of obscenity for displaying the sexually explicit photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe."
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 7, 1990
CINCINNATI -- If Jennifer Loesing never hears Robert Mapplethorpe's name again, it will be too soon. And as far as the photographer's sexually explicit photographs are concerned, Mrs. Loesing can only say: "Gross."But the 29-year-old X-ray technician said she and seven other jurors acquitted a Cincinnati museum and its director of obscenity charges on Friday because, as much as they were repulsed by the homoerotic images, jurors were convinced the photographs had artistic merit."We all agreed they were gross -- I think most people would find them so," Mrs. Loesing said yesterday.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 2, 1990
CINCINNATI---After six days of hearing about Robert Mapplethorpe's sexually explicit photographs,jurors in the landmark obscenity case finally got their first look yesterday at what all the fuss is aboutIf lead prosecutor Frank Prouty had hoped for stormy indignation as the homoerotic photos were passed from juror to juror,hed didn't get itJurors were impassive,taking just a few seconds each to review the controversial photographsThe slow-moving trial,which today...
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 29, 1990
CINCINNATI -- Defense attorneys for a Cincinnati art museum charged with pandering obscenity told a jury yesterday that Robert Mapplethorpe's photographic exploration of the gay underground was artistic and politically important -- no matter how disturbing the homoerotic images might be to them.Even though the controversial photographs reflect a "world many of us could never conceive of being part of," attorney H. Louis Sirkin said in his opening statement in the landmark trial, they represent an artistic record by a "brilliant photographer" of the gay "underground."
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