Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRobert Macneil
IN THE NEWS

Robert Macneil

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
"Homicide" is back! But tonight also marks a notable departure, as anchor Robert MacNeil retires from the nightly PBS news desk. Baltimore's Alan Keyes is also profiled in a new series looking at the 1996 presidential hopefuls.* "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Title namesake Robert MacNeil makes his last appearance, and a nostalgic special edition marks his departure -- as well as the 20th anniversary of the program. Next week, the show becomes merely "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | May 12, 2009
After 14 years of going solo at the PBS anchor desk, Jim Lehrer is expected to announce Tuesday at a programming conference in Baltimore that The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer will return to a co-anchor format in the fall. Lehrer, who will turn 75 next week, will be joined at the anchor desk by a rotating cast of correspondents, including Gwen Ifill, Judy Woodruff and Jeffrey Brown. Lehrer, who had a heart bypass operation in 1983, underwent a heart valve procedure last year that left him away from the show for several months.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 11, 1993
OK, SO maybe we're biased, but one of our favorite book genres is the journalist's autobiography.Imagine our delight, then, at opening the April issue of the College Park-based American Journalism Review and happening on a piece in which college professors John Maxwell Hamilton of Louisiana State University and Judith Paterson of the University of Maryland at College Park rate what they consider the 10 best autobiographies by newspaper types.In all, it's an impressive list. We might have substituted one or two others, such as William Shirer's "Nightmare Years," but we really have no complaints about the titles the two profs came up with.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 16, 2005
All the talk these days about how the era of the anchorman has ended amuses Jim Lehrer. With good reason. With Tom Brokaw, Peter Jennings and Dan Rather all leaving their newscasts during the last 11 months, there has been monumental change in TV news. But the Texas native, who has put in more years as anchor than any of them, each weeknight still brings 2.5 million Americans the most dependable hour of information and analysis on television. And Lehrer, who heads the PBS broadcast now known as the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, which this week marks its 30th anniversary, has no plans for change.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | January 2, 2005
Do You Speak American? by Robert MacNeil and William Cran. Doubleday, 304 pages, $24.95 If you pronounce the letter r after a vowel -- car instead of cah, water instead of watah -- you are probably an American. Regional accents have exceptions, but the postvocalic / r / , as linguists call it, is characteristic of American speech. If you worry that a tide of Hispanic immigrants will overwhelm the English language in the United States, your fears are probably exaggerated. Language studies have found that after a couple of generations, people of Latino descent are typically assimilated into the English-speaking culture.
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
"Breaking News," by Robert MacNeil. Nan A Talese Doubleday. 406 pages. $24.95. Revered network news anchorman Grant Munro - "Gregory Peck" to the mysterious and jivy online gossip columnist "Hollygo Lightly" - is facing 60 and the biggest decision of his aging career: Should he get a facelift?It's hard to imagine that revered television newsman Robert MacNeil ever spent a nanosecond pondering a nip-and-tuck. But in all other ways - and maybe in this way too, who knows? - Grant Munro is MacNeil.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | March 29, 1992
BURDEN OF DESIRE.Robert MacNeil.Doubleday.467 pages. $22.50. Some years ago, Wilfrid Sheed rebuked the grandiose claims of the New Journalists by noticing how many had tried writing fiction, proving there were matters of fact that only the imagination could handle.In his first such work, Robert MacNeil (as in Public Broadcasting's "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour") reminds us that the word "novel" means news that stays news and proves himself a novelist of both large and subtle gifts.Most of his news shouldn't be new but is, to our peril: Freud's discovery that reason is not master in its own house of the mind; that the feral paroxysms and happy hysteria of war, such as we saw only a year ago, suicidally threaten the future of the species; that throughout this century love has warred with death -- and death is winning.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | May 12, 2009
After 14 years of going solo at the PBS anchor desk, Jim Lehrer is expected to announce Tuesday at a programming conference in Baltimore that The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer will return to a co-anchor format in the fall. Lehrer, who will turn 75 next week, will be joined at the anchor desk by a rotating cast of correspondents, including Gwen Ifill, Judy Woodruff and Jeffrey Brown. Lehrer, who had a heart bypass operation in 1983, underwent a heart valve procedure last year that left him away from the show for several months.
FEATURES
By John Carman and John Carman,San Francisco Chronicle | November 22, 1992
TV is so hot, so naked, that you'll singe our finger if you touch the power button on your set.Or so goes the latest round of magazine articles and heavy-breathing TV reports, ever since white, blond actress Mariel Hemingway did her nude tease several weeks ago on "Civil Wars."A trend has been staked out and identified. Better yet, it's a conveniently self-fulfilling trend. You can't very well report on TV sex and nudity without showing TV sex and nudity.The truth is a little less shocking than the hype.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 16, 2005
All the talk these days about how the era of the anchorman has ended amuses Jim Lehrer. With good reason. With Tom Brokaw, Peter Jennings and Dan Rather all leaving their newscasts during the last 11 months, there has been monumental change in TV news. But the Texas native, who has put in more years as anchor than any of them, each weeknight still brings 2.5 million Americans the most dependable hour of information and analysis on television. And Lehrer, who heads the PBS broadcast now known as the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, which this week marks its 30th anniversary, has no plans for change.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | January 2, 2005
Do You Speak American? by Robert MacNeil and William Cran. Doubleday, 304 pages, $24.95 If you pronounce the letter r after a vowel -- car instead of cah, water instead of watah -- you are probably an American. Regional accents have exceptions, but the postvocalic / r / , as linguists call it, is characteristic of American speech. If you worry that a tide of Hispanic immigrants will overwhelm the English language in the United States, your fears are probably exaggerated. Language studies have found that after a couple of generations, people of Latino descent are typically assimilated into the English-speaking culture.
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
"Breaking News," by Robert MacNeil. Nan A Talese Doubleday. 406 pages. $24.95. Revered network news anchorman Grant Munro - "Gregory Peck" to the mysterious and jivy online gossip columnist "Hollygo Lightly" - is facing 60 and the biggest decision of his aging career: Should he get a facelift?It's hard to imagine that revered television newsman Robert MacNeil ever spent a nanosecond pondering a nip-and-tuck. But in all other ways - and maybe in this way too, who knows? - Grant Munro is MacNeil.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
"Homicide" is back! But tonight also marks a notable departure, as anchor Robert MacNeil retires from the nightly PBS news desk. Baltimore's Alan Keyes is also profiled in a new series looking at the 1996 presidential hopefuls.* "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Title namesake Robert MacNeil makes his last appearance, and a nostalgic special edition marks his departure -- as well as the 20th anniversary of the program. Next week, the show becomes merely "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer."
NEWS
May 11, 1993
OK, SO maybe we're biased, but one of our favorite book genres is the journalist's autobiography.Imagine our delight, then, at opening the April issue of the College Park-based American Journalism Review and happening on a piece in which college professors John Maxwell Hamilton of Louisiana State University and Judith Paterson of the University of Maryland at College Park rate what they consider the 10 best autobiographies by newspaper types.In all, it's an impressive list. We might have substituted one or two others, such as William Shirer's "Nightmare Years," but we really have no complaints about the titles the two profs came up with.
FEATURES
By John Carman and John Carman,San Francisco Chronicle | November 22, 1992
TV is so hot, so naked, that you'll singe our finger if you touch the power button on your set.Or so goes the latest round of magazine articles and heavy-breathing TV reports, ever since white, blond actress Mariel Hemingway did her nude tease several weeks ago on "Civil Wars."A trend has been staked out and identified. Better yet, it's a conveniently self-fulfilling trend. You can't very well report on TV sex and nudity without showing TV sex and nudity.The truth is a little less shocking than the hype.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | March 29, 1992
BURDEN OF DESIRE.Robert MacNeil.Doubleday.467 pages. $22.50. Some years ago, Wilfrid Sheed rebuked the grandiose claims of the New Journalists by noticing how many had tried writing fiction, proving there were matters of fact that only the imagination could handle.In his first such work, Robert MacNeil (as in Public Broadcasting's "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour") reminds us that the word "novel" means news that stays news and proves himself a novelist of both large and subtle gifts.Most of his news shouldn't be new but is, to our peril: Freud's discovery that reason is not master in its own house of the mind; that the feral paroxysms and happy hysteria of war, such as we saw only a year ago, suicidally threaten the future of the species; that throughout this century love has warred with death -- and death is winning.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 5, 1990
THE MACNEIL/LEHRER REPORT" is sending itself a valentine this week on PBS in the form of a special celebrating its 15th anniversary which airs tomorrow night at 7 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67.There's something a little smarmy about this program. Imagine if CBS did "Dan Rather: A Decade at the Anchor Desk" or ABC did "The Peter Jennings Years." We would be justifiably disgusted at this blatant self-promotion.But, it's membership drive time, PBS' equivalent of a sweep month, so "15 Years of MacNeil/Lehrer" is not really intended to be an insightful examination of this program, but rather a compendium of moments designed to make its regular viewers feel the appropriate combination of guilty and grateful that will make them phone in their contribution.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Last Friday's PBS debate between the six Democratic presidential candidates illustrated that these forums can be useful ways of getting beyond the sound bites that often characterize campaign coverage. Granted, this debate ran for two uninterrupted hours -- something that may only be possible on public broadcasting. But other things about the format could be adapted to the networks.Candidates were told to police themselves in terms of time. And, surprisingly enough, faced with the expectation that they would follow the rules and behave civilly, they did. Except for former California Gov. Jerry Brown, who brought up the Gennifer Flowers-Bill Clinton scandal and insisted again on giving out his campaign's 800 number, urging viewers to send contributions.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | December 5, 1990
THE MACNEIL/LEHRER REPORT" is sending itself a valentine this week on PBS in the form of a special celebrating its 15th anniversary which airs tomorrow night at 7 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67.There's something a little smarmy about this program. Imagine if CBS did "Dan Rather: A Decade at the Anchor Desk" or ABC did "The Peter Jennings Years." We would be justifiably disgusted at this blatant self-promotion.But, it's membership drive time, PBS' equivalent of a sweep month, so "15 Years of MacNeil/Lehrer" is not really intended to be an insightful examination of this program, but rather a compendium of moments designed to make its regular viewers feel the appropriate combination of guilty and grateful that will make them phone in their contribution.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.