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By TIM BAKER | June 19, 1995
OK. I read the book. Now I've seen the movie. And I'm totally disillusioned with women. How could this story enthrall so many of you?Not just women addicted to pulp fiction and the day-time soaps. But intelligent women. Happily married women. Women who read literature and enjoy good conversation. The story sweeps them away.''I am the highway and a peregrine and all the sails that ever went to sea.'' Really!Lines like that weren't the only reason to despise ''The Bridges of Madison County.
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By DAVE BARRY | July 23, 1995
As a sensitive and artistic individual, I have spent a lot of time recently trying to figure out how I can cash in on "The Bridges of Madison County." This is of course the humongous best-seller book by Robert James Edward Henry Morton "Bud" Waller. It was recently made into one of the summer's top movies.It tells the compelling story of a lonely and bored Iowa farm wife named Francesca Johnson, who is actually Meryl Streep.One day Francesca's family goes away on a trip, and her life is changed forever by the arrival of photographer Robert Kincaid, who is really Clint Eastwood.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
Entire forests have been wiped out so that film critics could explain the evolution of Clint Eastwood characters from laconic, hard-bitten misanthropes to sensitive, vulnerable lugs. But say this about the old characters: At least you knew where they stood.In the 1976 western "The Outlaw Josey Wales," the Eastwood character kills a couple of ornery bounty hunters and grimaces as his young sidekick expresses the desire to see the bodies receive a decent burial.Eastwood's answer is to send a stream of tobacco juice splattering onto the forehead of one of the corpses.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | June 19, 1995
OK. I read the book. Now I've seen the movie. And I'm totally disillusioned with women. How could this story enthrall so many of you?Not just women addicted to pulp fiction and the day-time soaps. But intelligent women. Happily married women. Women who read literature and enjoy good conversation. The story sweeps them away.''I am the highway and a peregrine and all the sails that ever went to sea.'' Really!Lines like that weren't the only reason to despise ''The Bridges of Madison County.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | August 27, 1993
There are songs that come free from the green, chemically treated grass, from the blackened gravel of a thousand interstate highways. This is one of them.*Francesca watched intently as the pickup slowly pulled into her driveway. Out stepped a man, lithe and lean-muscled and looking like some vision from a never-written book on the gods. She felt her heart quicken."Robert Kincaid!" she cried."Name's Peterson, ma'am," he said.He pointed to the neat lettering on the side door of the Ford Ranger: Walt Peterson Pest Control -- Free Consultation and Estimates.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | July 23, 1995
As a sensitive and artistic individual, I have spent a lot of time recently trying to figure out how I can cash in on "The Bridges of Madison County." This is of course the humongous best-seller book by Robert James Edward Henry Morton "Bud" Waller. It was recently made into one of the summer's top movies.It tells the compelling story of a lonely and bored Iowa farm wife named Francesca Johnson, who is actually Meryl Streep.One day Francesca's family goes away on a trip, and her life is changed forever by the arrival of photographer Robert Kincaid, who is really Clint Eastwood.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | November 3, 1993
Just when your hankies finally dried out, here comes Robert James Waller again.The author of the out-of-nowhere best seller "The Bridges of Madison County" is back in the tear-jerking business with his latest book, "Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend" (Warner, $16.95)."Waltz" -- another angst-in-Iowa romance between a lanky, would-be cowboy and a repressed married woman -- no doubt will benefit from the phenomenal success of "Bridges." In fact, it's No. 2, second only to its predecessor, on the Publishers Weekly best-seller list for last week.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | August 6, 1993
Comparisons are inevitable between Robert James Waller's guaranteed tear-jerker and two other authors' works that tugged national heartstrings in the sentimental '70s. (Interesting to note: The best-selling novel of the hard-edged 1980s was "Clear and Present Danger," the techno-thriller by Maryland author Tom Clancy, which sold 1.6 million copies in hardcover)."Love Story" parallels "The Bridges of Madison County" in several ways. It, too, was a very short (131 pages), hyper-romantic but bittersweet first novel written by an academician -- in this case, Yale classics professor Erich Segal.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 13, 1995
The women of the book club to which I belong read "The Bridges of Madison County" and so it made sense that we see the movie together.We knew we should not have liked that book. Critics threw it across the room and started yelling. To see the movie would xTC compound our simple-mindedness. But we looked at it as an academic exercise. Sort of a field trip. We would pack tissues instead of a boxed juice drink.But Betsy's husband had a night meeting and she couldn't go. Nan had to attend the graduation ceremonies at the school where she is a teacher.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this column | October 22, 1993
Executives fretting about labor shortageIt may seem to the average worker that all the good jobs are disappearing. But most executives are worried about the opposite problem -- not enough good, well-trained workers.A survey sponsored by Accountemps, the New York-based temporary services agency, found that nearly three out of four executives at large companies fear a shortage of skilled labor by the year 2000.And some local employers say they are already seeing puzzling labor shortages.Jim Whiteford, a supervisor at Asplundh Tree Expert Co., said he attended a blue-collar job fair held by Dundalk Community College this week to look for backhoe operators.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
Entire forests have been wiped out so that film critics could explain the evolution of Clint Eastwood characters from laconic, hard-bitten misanthropes to sensitive, vulnerable lugs. But say this about the old characters: At least you knew where they stood.In the 1976 western "The Outlaw Josey Wales," the Eastwood character kills a couple of ornery bounty hunters and grimaces as his young sidekick expresses the desire to see the bodies receive a decent burial.Eastwood's answer is to send a stream of tobacco juice splattering onto the forehead of one of the corpses.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | August 27, 1993
There are songs that come free from the green, chemically treated grass, from the blackened gravel of a thousand interstate highways. This is one of them.*Francesca watched intently as the pickup slowly pulled into her driveway. Out stepped a man, lithe and lean-muscled and looking like some vision from a never-written book on the gods. She felt her heart quicken."Robert Kincaid!" she cried."Name's Peterson, ma'am," he said.He pointed to the neat lettering on the side door of the Ford Ranger: Walt Peterson Pest Control -- Free Consultation and Estimates.
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