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By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | January 16, 2000
"In Love With Night: The American Romance With Robert Kennedy," by Ronald Steel. Simon & Schuster. 224 pages. $23. The Eternal Flame on John Kennedy's grave was not even lit before the myth was born. In his eulogy to his slain brother, a grieving Robert Kennedy invoked some of the most poignant lines from Shakespeare -- Juliet's tender prayer that her doomed Romeo be cut out in little stars to "make the face of heaven so fine that all the world will be in love with night." So began Camelot, a mythic place where happiness is decreed by sheer optimism of the will.
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NEWS
September 25, 2013
When President Obama addressed the families and colleagues of victims of the mass shooting at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington last week, he lamented what he called a sense of "creeping resignation" among Americans toward the epidemic gun violence that has taken so many innocent lives in recent years. "Our hearts are broken again," he said, yet we seem unwilling to do what is necessary to prevent a recurrence of these shocking tragedies — and so, inevitably, they will happen again.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 7, 1993
BOSTON -- As old Robert F. Kennedy relatives, friends and supporters gathered here at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library to observe the 25th anniversary of his death this weekend, the inevitable what-might-have-beens were heard.Some were obvious. Had he lived and been elected president in 1968, as one panelist put it, "there would have been no burglar tools in the White House" in the Watergate scandal four years later. Richard Nixon as president and his vice president, Spiro Agnew, would not have been forced to resign in disgrace in the country's most corrupt period.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Jules Witcover's commentary ("Don't count Biden out in 2016," Jan. 29) contrasts the vice president's potency with former vice presidents who had little influence or significance in American history. Indeed, when Lyndon Johnson was broached by John Kennedy in 1960 to be Kennedy's running mate, LBJ allegedly asked his mentor and fellow Texan, John Nance Garner, about the vice presidency. Garner, who was Roosevelt's veep between 1933 and 1941, allegedly replied, "Lyndon, the vice presidency isn't worth a bucket of spit!"
NEWS
By JULES WITCOVER | June 6, 1993
Ever since the death of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy in Los Angeles 25 years ago today, his followers have been looking in vain for a political heir.Last year, some hoped they had found him in Bill Clinton, another young presidential aspirant who spoke, as Robert Kennedy did, about the plight of the disadvantaged and the need for the country to address inequities and unmet social needs.One characteristic of Mr. Clinton in his 1992 presidential campaign bore a striking resemblance to the Kennedy of the 1968 campaign.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | July 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- Rico Riley takes America's political pulse from behind an upturned cardboard box in Times Square. He hawks campaign buttons, and he knows what sells.Slap a mug of Dan Quayle and a rude comment onto a little aluminum circle and plasticize it, you've got a winner. Bill Clinton and Al Gore, Hillary Clinton and Tipper Gore or any combination, that's good business this week.And the Kennedys, John or Robert, alone or together -- a tour de force for any button man."OK, these guys, there's just something about 'em that gets people," Mr. Riley said.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2004
Sharp-eyed readers of The New York Times Magazine may have noticed a recent advertisement announcing the sale of the Kennedy family's historic Hickory Hill estate in McLean, Va. The 13-bedroom, white brick Georgian home and surrounding estate is being offered by Sotheby's International Realty in New York City. It sits off Chain Bridge Road on about six acres and has 12 fireplaces, stables for horses, a movie theater, tennis courts, a pool and cabana. The asking price is reportedly $25 million, but Sotheby's officials would not comment for this article.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1997
"Robert Kennedy: Brother Protector," by James Hilty.Temple University Press. 576 pages. $34.95Before there was Janet Reno, before Richard Nixon's Saturday Night Massacre and before the special prosecutor law itself, there was Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, who saw not just his job but his mission in life as protecting his brother, who happened to be president of the United States.A thousand and one Kennedy books are out there, one for every day of John F. Kennedy's mythical reign. But this one, written by a historian, actually provides a useful service.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 10, 1998
It's been 30 years since I made the walk from my rowhouse in the 400 block of East 22nd Street down to Penn Station. The walk couldn't have been any more than 10 blocks. I imagine I made it in 20 minutes or so. But I had time. The Train hadn't arrived yet, and wouldn't for a while.Just a few days earlier my mother had risen at her usual hour to get ready for work. She always turned on the radio as she got dressed. That's when she got the announcement. She yelled up the stairs and gave me the news.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 7, 1993
ARLINGTON, Va. -- As about 18,000 people watched from the hillsides of Arlington National Cemetery, President Clinton late yesterday joined the family and close friends of Robert F. Kennedy in a graveside Mass on the 25th anniversary of the New York senator's death by assassination.The president -- who for most of the tribute sat next to Robert Kennedy's widow, Ethel, while first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton sat beside Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass. -- lauded the slain leader as "a relentless searcher for change, for growth, for the potential of heart and mind that he sought for himself and that he demanded of others."
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 22, 2008
For people who think there's no cultural divide in this country, consider the treatment of two women much in the news in 2008. The first is Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. A woman from humble roots and with a blue-collar life story, she worked with her steelworker and professional-fisherman husband to provide a life for their large family. She got involved in the PTA. She became mayor of her small town, then rose, by dint of her dedication and almost naive fearlessness, to the job of governor.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend is still moved by the strangers who approach her to describe how her father inspired them. Former U.S. Sen. Joseph Tydings, a Maryland Democrat, says that his dear friend Robert F. Kennedy's murder transformed him into a gun control activist, a move that cost him his political career. And civil rights advocate Kweisi Mfume remembers 1968 as a pivotal year of his life, with Kennedy's death as one in a series of events prompting him to pursue a political career that led him to the halls of Congress.
FEATURES
By Christopher T. Assaf and Christopher T. Assaf,Sun reporter | June 4, 2008
New Milford, Conn. - The kernel was planted in Bill Eppridge's mind while he was studying photojournalism at the University of Missouri. "Create a photographic epic poem." Eppridge was taking a history course in the late 1950s taught by the university's poet-in-residence, John Neihardt, who was best known for his 1932 book, Black Elk S peaks, about an Oglala Lakota medicine man who had witnessed Gen. George Custer's defeat at Little Big Horn and the Massacre of Wounded Knee. Outside of class, Eppridge spent a lot of time discussing what Neihardt, the poet laureate of Nebraska and the Plains, called epic poems.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 13, 2008
We hate talking about it. We fear saying something awkward or intrusive. We think we'll only make it worse by acknowledging it, so we fall silent. "I think, in large part," Kathleen Kennedy Townsend says, "we don't have a culture that knows how to deal with death." Townsend, a former Maryland lieutenant governor, is, of course, sadly expert on the subject of death. When she was 12, her uncle was killed; when she was 16, her father. That these intimates were President John F. Kennedy and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy is something that is a well-known part of her biography, if not necessarily something that she speaks extensively about in public.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | May 23, 2007
Baltimore historian Taylor Branch is to receive a major literary award today for the final installment of his trilogy on Martin Luther King Jr. and his times. The book, At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-68 (Simon & Schuster, 2006), is to be honored at George Washington University by the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing human rights. At Canaan's Edge has already won the 2006 Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for Non-Fiction and was a finalist for last year's National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | March 11, 2007
I DON'T KNOW WHY, BUT IT WAS REALLY important to me that my children watch the Sharks' and Jets' playground dance-off in West Side Story. I guess I wanted them to know where Michael Jackson got the idea for "Beat It." And I wanted my daughter to see Franco Zeffirelli's 1968 Romeo and Juliet, too, if she was going to see Claire Danes' 1996 version. I wanted her to see the huge role that costumes alone can play in a movie. And when my husband answered my son's suggestion that he sell the old sailboat under the deck -- the boat that had never been wet except with rain in all the years of his young life -- with the single word, "Rosebud," I wished that my son had understood.
NEWS
September 13, 1992
Services for William Ernest Kennedy, 71, a foreman for the State Highway Administration, will be at 10 a.m. Sept. 14, at Singleton Funeral Home.Mr. Kennedy died Sept. 10 at Deaton Medical Center.A resident of Severn for 43 years, he served as a 1st Class aviation machinist mate in the Navy, retiring in 1960.Among his interests were hunting, fishing and playing the banjo.He was a member of the Severn Baptist Church and Moose Lodge 1456 of Glen Burnie.He is survived by his wife, the former Frances A. Bowman of Severn; sons, Curtis William Kennedy of Jacksonville, Fla., and Robert Kennedy of Severn; daughters, Virginia Carroll Riley of Baltimore, Barbara Lynn Griffith, Dale Jean Emerson, Gerry Kennedy and Jan Kennedy, all of Severn; brothers, Joseph Kennedy and Walter Kennedy, both of Coeburn, Va.; and sister, Mattie Atkins of Jacksonville, Fla.
NEWS
By Ralph Schoenman and Ralph Schoenman,Special to The Sun | May 28, 1995
June 5, the 27th anniversary of the assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, is the publication date of a book by Dan E. Moldea, "The Killing of Robert F. Kennedy: An Investigation of Motive, Means and Opportunity" (W.W. Norton & Company. 342 pages. $27.50). Publicity material for the book proclaims, "Here is the definitive book on Robert F. Kennedy's assassination allowing this tragic chapter in our history to be put to rest at last."Mr. Moldea ends his book, "Sirhan Bishara Sirhan consciously and knowingly murdered Senator Robert Kennedy, and he acted alone."
NEWS
December 23, 2004
Jack Newfield,66, a muckraking reporter and newspaper columnist who wrote books on Robert F. Kennedy and boxing impresario Don King, died of cancer Monday night at a New York City hospital. Mr. Newfield's career included stints at the Village Voice, the Daily News and New York Post. He won numerous awards, including the George Polk Award and an Emmy. Most recently, he was a columnist at the New York Sun. A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Newfield was drawn to the civil rights movement after college, and his first book, A Prophetic Minority, dealt with his experiences in the South.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2004
Sharp-eyed readers of The New York Times Magazine may have noticed a recent advertisement announcing the sale of the Kennedy family's historic Hickory Hill estate in McLean, Va. The 13-bedroom, white brick Georgian home and surrounding estate is being offered by Sotheby's International Realty in New York City. It sits off Chain Bridge Road on about six acres and has 12 fireplaces, stables for horses, a movie theater, tennis courts, a pool and cabana. The asking price is reportedly $25 million, but Sotheby's officials would not comment for this article.
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