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By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 11, 1997
Much is being made of a television series by Robert Hughes, the eminent art critic, that will be shown on public broadcasting channels beginning May 28. Far more should be made of his associated book, "American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America" (Knopf. 635 pages. $65).Each of the eight elements of the TV production contains about spoken words. Each of the book's nine chapters contains about 20,000 words of splendidly fluent, lean prose. As active as Hughes and his film crew were in traveling to 100 locations the length and breadth of the land, the most important visual aids to his larger task are reproductions of art. In the book they are superbly integrated in the text, and far clearer, on fine coated stock than on a screen.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2011
Robert Russell Hughes, founder of Chemspec, a Baltimore company that sold carpet cleaning products to professional carpet cleaners worldwide, died July 22 from complications of Parkinson's disease at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 87. Mr. Hughes, the son of a movie projectionist and a silent movie organist, was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he graduated from Northeast Catholic High School and played varsity football. He began his college studies at LaSalle College and then left in 1942 to join the Marine Corps, where he was trained as a weather forecaster.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In 27 years of plain-spoken opinion written for Time magazine, Robert Hughes of Australia has become America's most famous art critic. He will become even better known through his latest project: an eight-part television series, "American Visions," that debuts tonight on PBS.The series is accompanied by a hefty book ("American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America") that sells for $65 and an issue of Time entirely written by Hughes ($3.95).Hughes peppers "American Visions" with his trenchant opinions, which provide quotable quotes on everything from Thomas Jefferson (loves him)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 9, 2003
Goya, by Robert Hughes. Knopf. 448 pages. $28. The portrait of Francisco Goya y Lucientes that emerges from Robert Hughes' lively biography is that of an ambitious, tormented genius whose hard work and extraordinary longevity (he lived to the, for his time, unusually old age of 82) enabled him to create works that rank among art's supreme expressions of the tragic vision of life. In Hughes' telling, the Goya of legend is largely an invention of 19th-century biographers who tailored the facts of his career to suit their own agendas.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In his television series "American Visions," Robert Hughes has taken on a huge task -- no less than to tell the story of more than three centuries of American art in eight hours.Amazingly enough, he has done even more than that.In eight beautifully photographed episodes shot at more than 100 locations across the country, he has, in effect, told the story of American history and shown how American art parallels it. He takes us from the Spanish settlement of the Southwest and the Puritan settlement of the Northeast in the 17th century up to the age of anxiety following the fiasco of Vietnam.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 9, 1994
Baltimore County executive Roger B. Hayden suffered a ruptured blood vessel in his brain yesterday, and is a patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital today where he will be undergoing tests for the next several days.Mr. Hayden, who spoke to this reporter on the telephone just before 10 a.m. from an intensive care unit at Hopkins, said the incident is the result of a condition he's had for years. "I'm hanging in there" he said, explaining that there is a tangle of tiny blood vessels over his right eye which have periodically caused painful headaches, but this is the first time one has burst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 9, 2003
Goya, by Robert Hughes. Knopf. 448 pages. $28. The portrait of Francisco Goya y Lucientes that emerges from Robert Hughes' lively biography is that of an ambitious, tormented genius whose hard work and extraordinary longevity (he lived to the, for his time, unusually old age of 82) enabled him to create works that rank among art's supreme expressions of the tragic vision of life. In Hughes' telling, the Goya of legend is largely an invention of 19th-century biographers who tailored the facts of his career to suit their own agendas.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | April 11, 1993
CULTURE OF COMPLAINT: THE FRAYING OF AMERICA. Robert Hughes. Oxford University Press New York Public Library. 203 pages. $19.95. If you're in the mood for a flagellation of contemporary American culture -- and for a demonstration of its increasingly intertwined relationship with politics -- do I have a book for you. Robert Hughes, Time's art critic and author of numerous award-winning books of history and cultural criticism ("Barcelona," "The Fatal Shore"),...
FEATURES
By DANIEL GRANT | November 11, 1990
Nothing If Not Critical:Selected Essays on Art and Artists.Robert Hughes.Knopf.429 pages. $24.95. Granted, the tone of most magazine writing tends to be a bit on the sneering side, full of sarcasms and hyperbole passing for new ways of saying the same old thing, but Robert Hughes' venom seems to have no end. It also seems to have no specific basis, as the tone of almost everything emanating from Mr. Hughes, a Time magazine art critic, is one of crotchety scorn.It...
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1995
The Rev. Henry J. Hughes, who ministered to the mentally ill and the addicted, died Sunday of a stroke at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 82.Father Hughes retired in 1983 as chaplain at Spring Grove Hospital Center. He was the state institution's first full-time Catholic chaplain after his appointment in 1963. He began his association with the institution on a part-time basis in 1948."I see the young and the old of all races, those whose troubles may be mild or severe. There are alcoholics, drug addicts, people who suffer from psychosis or neurosis, schizophrenics and a few people who are retarded," Father Hughes said in an Evening Sun interview in 1964.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In his television series "American Visions," Robert Hughes has taken on a huge task -- no less than to tell the story of more than three centuries of American art in eight hours.Amazingly enough, he has done even more than that.In eight beautifully photographed episodes shot at more than 100 locations across the country, he has, in effect, told the story of American history and shown how American art parallels it. He takes us from the Spanish settlement of the Southwest and the Puritan settlement of the Northeast in the 17th century up to the age of anxiety following the fiasco of Vietnam.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 28, 1997
In 27 years of plain-spoken opinion written for Time magazine, Robert Hughes of Australia has become America's most famous art critic. He will become even better known through his latest project: an eight-part television series, "American Visions," that debuts tonight on PBS.The series is accompanied by a hefty book ("American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America") that sells for $65 and an issue of Time entirely written by Hughes ($3.95).Hughes peppers "American Visions" with his trenchant opinions, which provide quotable quotes on everything from Thomas Jefferson (loves him)
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 11, 1997
Much is being made of a television series by Robert Hughes, the eminent art critic, that will be shown on public broadcasting channels beginning May 28. Far more should be made of his associated book, "American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America" (Knopf. 635 pages. $65).Each of the eight elements of the TV production contains about spoken words. Each of the book's nine chapters contains about 20,000 words of splendidly fluent, lean prose. As active as Hughes and his film crew were in traveling to 100 locations the length and breadth of the land, the most important visual aids to his larger task are reproductions of art. In the book they are superbly integrated in the text, and far clearer, on fine coated stock than on a screen.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1995
The Rev. Henry J. Hughes, who ministered to the mentally ill and the addicted, died Sunday of a stroke at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 82.Father Hughes retired in 1983 as chaplain at Spring Grove Hospital Center. He was the state institution's first full-time Catholic chaplain after his appointment in 1963. He began his association with the institution on a part-time basis in 1948."I see the young and the old of all races, those whose troubles may be mild or severe. There are alcoholics, drug addicts, people who suffer from psychosis or neurosis, schizophrenics and a few people who are retarded," Father Hughes said in an Evening Sun interview in 1964.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 9, 1994
Baltimore County executive Roger B. Hayden suffered a ruptured blood vessel in his brain yesterday, and is a patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital today where he will be undergoing tests for the next several days.Mr. Hayden, who spoke to this reporter on the telephone just before 10 a.m. from an intensive care unit at Hopkins, said the incident is the result of a condition he's had for years. "I'm hanging in there" he said, explaining that there is a tangle of tiny blood vessels over his right eye which have periodically caused painful headaches, but this is the first time one has burst.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | April 11, 1993
CULTURE OF COMPLAINT: THE FRAYING OF AMERICA. Robert Hughes. Oxford University Press New York Public Library. 203 pages. $19.95. If you're in the mood for a flagellation of contemporary American culture -- and for a demonstration of its increasingly intertwined relationship with politics -- do I have a book for you. Robert Hughes, Time's art critic and author of numerous award-winning books of history and cultural criticism ("Barcelona," "The Fatal Shore"),...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 5, 2011
Robert Russell Hughes, founder of Chemspec, a Baltimore company that sold carpet cleaning products to professional carpet cleaners worldwide, died July 22 from complications of Parkinson's disease at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 87. Mr. Hughes, the son of a movie projectionist and a silent movie organist, was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he graduated from Northeast Catholic High School and played varsity football. He began his college studies at LaSalle College and then left in 1942 to join the Marine Corps, where he was trained as a weather forecaster.
FEATURES
By DANIEL GRANT | November 11, 1990
Nothing If Not Critical:Selected Essays on Art and Artists.Robert Hughes.Knopf.429 pages. $24.95. Granted, the tone of most magazine writing tends to be a bit on the sneering side, full of sarcasms and hyperbole passing for new ways of saying the same old thing, but Robert Hughes' venom seems to have no end. It also seems to have no specific basis, as the tone of almost everything emanating from Mr. Hughes, a Time magazine art critic, is one of crotchety scorn.It...
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