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NEWS
September 29, 1991
As Senate hearings reopen this week on the nomination of Robert M. Gates as Director of Central Intelligence, troubling questions continue:* How credible is the nominee when he claims he cannot remember conversations about the Iran-contra affair that are specifically recalled by close associates at the Central Intelligence Agency?* How good is his judgment in light of his admitted failure to perceive weakness in the Soviet Union, his supposed area of expertise, and the way his anti-Communist zeal resulted in positions that were more advocacy than analysis?
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NEWS
July 31, 2014
When is The Sun going to do an expose about the lack of a responsible leader in the U.S. Senate (formerly known as the most revered deliberative legislative body in the world)? I am reading "Duty" by Robert Gates who basically thinks Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is a subversive. Senator Reid has held over 100 bills passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and kept them from being voted on. He has multiple relatives with jobs in the government, and he has become a multi-millionaire while serving in the Senate At least the Koch brothers provide a product from their businesses.
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NEWS
By Newsday | October 9, 1991
THE CHARGES against Robert Gates last week could not be more serious. His own colleagues at the Central Intelligence Agency, one of whom advanced and prospered within the agency under his guidance, said that Gates skewed intelligence to conform to the political wishes of superiors. These analysts said that Gates systematically and deliberately quashed dissent the single most important issue the agency had to deal with: the Soviet Union.While agency analysts were trying to get the word out that the Soviet economy was in a death spin and that the reforms of Mikhail Gorbachev were genuine, Gates was promoting just the opposite conclusion: that the Soviet Union was still an economic juggernaut with increasing military prowess.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 21, 2014
One of the best and most enduring aspects of presidential cabinets has been the willingness of many chief executives to appoint at least one member from the opposition party. The practice demonstrates bipartisanship and also gives the president access to views that may not always be offered by loyalist appointees. The custom of reaching across the party aisle has been brought into question by the new memoir of former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, kept in the job by President Obama as a carryover from the George W. Bush presidency.
NEWS
September 23, 1991
In a week of hearings, Robert Gates, President Bush's nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, remains an enigmatic figure. True, no hard evidence was found to prove that he knew about the criminality that was taking place all around him when the illegal Iran-contra scheme was being carried out. But this leaves Gates, by his own admission that he should have made further inquiries, something of a bumbling incompetent. So, as the old saying goes, it's better to do business with a crook than a fool, because a crook can always have an honest day.Gates' competence is further brought into question by his consistent reporting of misinformation about the strength of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 17, 1991
Even Robert Gates' most steadfast defenders have to admit that he has a great deal to overcome in order to win confirmation as director of the Central Intelligence Agency.Gates opened the Senate hearings on his nomination yesterday by conceding that he "should have done more" to learn about the whole illegal, arms-for-hostages trading scheme which goes under the rubric of "Iran-contra."Just how much Gates did know is problematical. For one thing, the present acting director of the CIA, Richard Kerr, says he told Gates about the illegal enterprise a full month before Gates claimed to have discovered it. Gates says he simply forgot about it -- a claim which stretches credibility to the snapping point.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 20, 2013
Authors Bill Bryson and Doris Kearns Goodwin are among the headliners for the 2013-14 Baltimore Speakers Series, part of a lineup that is sure to delight book lovers. Bryson, whose "In a Sunburned Country" is one of my favorites, will appear Sept. 30 to start the series sponsored by Stevenson University. His humorous style has won him a loyal folllowing, and his travel books are must-reads. Among his other gems are "Neither Here Nor There" -- which is on my nightstand right now -- "A Walk in the Woods" and "A Short History of Nearly Everything.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
When is The Sun going to do an expose about the lack of a responsible leader in the U.S. Senate (formerly known as the most revered deliberative legislative body in the world)? I am reading "Duty" by Robert Gates who basically thinks Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is a subversive. Senator Reid has held over 100 bills passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and kept them from being voted on. He has multiple relatives with jobs in the government, and he has become a multi-millionaire while serving in the Senate At least the Koch brothers provide a product from their businesses.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A majority of the Senate Intelligence Committee was expected today to approve the nomination of Robert M. Gates as the next director of Central Intelligence.The vote, which comes more than five months after President Bush named his deputy national security adviser to serve as the country's espionage chief, would move the nomination to the full Senate, where an intense debate is expected over Gates' fitness for a job he was denied in 1987.Confirmation by the Senate hinges on the decision of crucial uncommitted Democrats, although the endorsement of the committee would boost Gates' chances.
NEWS
November 5, 1991
Now that the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted 11-4 to confirm Robert M. Gates as head of the Central Intelligence Agency, it seems likely the full Senate will concur today. If Mr. Gates knew more about the Iran-contra scandal than he confessed, if he slanted intelligence analysis to please his bosses in the Reagan administration, if he browbeat subordinates and undermined morale, apparently most senators don't want to know. They are learning the uses of "deniability," a field in which Mr. Gates is an expert.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Where's The Sun's editorial page today with all the new revelations about Benghazi and Robert Gates' new book, "Duty?" Even The Sun's ultra liberal attack dog, Thomas F. Schaller, writes about "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" ( "The outrage machine," Jan. 15). What's going on, is The Sun deserting a sinking, scandal-ridden ship? Remember, all Richard Nixon did was stupid and he lied, forcing his resignation and people went to jail. This guy lies every time his lips move, and people died at Benghazi and "Fast and Furious," and he, so far, has not resigned and no one has gone to jail or even resigned.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 20, 2013
Authors Bill Bryson and Doris Kearns Goodwin are among the headliners for the 2013-14 Baltimore Speakers Series, part of a lineup that is sure to delight book lovers. Bryson, whose "In a Sunburned Country" is one of my favorites, will appear Sept. 30 to start the series sponsored by Stevenson University. His humorous style has won him a loyal folllowing, and his travel books are must-reads. Among his other gems are "Neither Here Nor There" -- which is on my nightstand right now -- "A Walk in the Woods" and "A Short History of Nearly Everything.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | June 29, 2011
CIA Director Leon Panetta becomes secretary of defense Thursday, taking over Washington's largest and most powerful bureaucracy with a budget that amounts to nearly 60 percent of discretionary federal spending. He will be stepping into the shoes of the most influential member of the Obama administration, Robert M. Gates, who has been canonized for his efforts over the past five years. For the past two months, Secretary of Defense Gates has been on a farewell tour of U.S. think tanks, universities and military academies, advocating policies that will make Mr. Panetta's job extremely difficult.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Absorbing the lessons of a troubled war, U.S. military officials have begun an intense debate over proposals for a sweeping reorganization of the Army to address shortcomings that have beset the force in Iraq and to abandon some war-fighting principles that have prevailed since the Cold War. On one side of the widening debate are officers who want many Army units to become specialized, so that entire units or even divisions are dedicated to...
NEWS
November 5, 1991
Now that the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted 11-4 to confirm Robert M. Gates as head of the Central Intelligence Agency, it seems likely the full Senate will concur today. If Mr. Gates knew more about the Iran-contra scandal than he confessed, if he slanted intelligence analysis to please his bosses in the Reagan administration, if he browbeat subordinates and undermined morale, apparently most senators don't want to know. They are learning the uses of "deniability," a field in which Mr. Gates is an expert.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | November 4, 1991
New Orleans. - It's no picnic being a spy these days. Look at what Robert Gates is going through: They are trying to make him tell the truth.That's organically impossible for a spy. Contra Naturam. They train spies to fool lie detectors. If Mr. Gates says he tells the truth it means that he's lying. Only if he's lying (which he won't tell us) might we assume that he's telling the truth. Cretans were liars. Therefore they were spies. Also, spies talk in codes. They are codes. What do Watergate, Irangate, Contragate all have in common?
NEWS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | September 17, 1991
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Robert Gates, President Bush's nominee to head the CIA, ran into renewed criticism today over his failure to pursue suspicions about the Iran-contra affair when he first became aware of it in 1986.Citing past testimony from Gates that the nominee's first reaction was to ignore the information, Sen. Howard Metzenbaum, D-Ohio, said, "Mr. Gates, that blows my mind."Metzenbaum, questioning Gates in the second day of his confirmation hearings, called him the "see-no-evil, hear-no-evil, speak-no-evil" nominee who was seeking to preserve his career by not making waves.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | September 20, 1991
Chicago. -- Robert Gates says, now, that he was wrong to scoff at the possibility that the Soviet Union was changing its tune. But he belonged to an organization whose whole ethos prevented people from recognizing the possibility of peaceful accommodation anywhere on the globe. James Angleton, as the CIA's counterespionage chief, spent years crusading against the very notion that there could be a Sino-Soviet split.It is easy to see why the CIA has a psychological stake in doomsday scenarios.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schell | October 23, 1991
THE SENATE now proceeds from its confirmation of Clarence Thomas as Supreme Court justice to its vote on Robert Gates as CIA director. In the Thomas hearings, the question was the truth of testimony. In the Gates hearings, too, the question had arisen, and also the additional question of whether anyone wanted to know the truth.The human mind, it seems, is helplessly absorptive: If we see a car accident, whether we like it or not, that accident is imprinted in our minds. Yet there can come a time when we would prefer not to know what we have involuntarily learned.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A majority of the Senate Intelligence Committee was expected today to approve the nomination of Robert M. Gates as the next director of Central Intelligence.The vote, which comes more than five months after President Bush named his deputy national security adviser to serve as the country's espionage chief, would move the nomination to the full Senate, where an intense debate is expected over Gates' fitness for a job he was denied in 1987.Confirmation by the Senate hinges on the decision of crucial uncommitted Democrats, although the endorsement of the committee would boost Gates' chances.
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