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Robert Garrett

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2004
Robert Garrett, scion of a wealthy and influential Baltimore banking and railroad family who became a businessman and philanthropist, was known as the "last first Olympian." He earned that distinction because at his death in 1961, he was the sole survivor of the 13 U.S. athletes who had traveled to Athens in 1896 for the first of the modern Olympic Games. He was 86 at his death. Garrett was born in 1875 in Baltimore County, the son of Thomas Harrison Garrett and Alice Whitridge Garrett.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 15, 2009
Richard F. Mulligan, a former longtime manager of the municipal bond department at Alex. Brown & Sons, died Thursday from metastatic melanoma at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 76. Born and raised in New York City, the son of an Empire Trust Co. bank teller and a homemaker, he was a 1950 graduate of Fordham Preparatory School. After serving in the Army as a private from 1952 to 1954, he went to work at the Federal Reserve Bank and Smith Barney & Co. in New York City, and while attending Fordham University at night, earned a bachelor's degree in 1958.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 15, 2009
Richard F. Mulligan, a former longtime manager of the municipal bond department at Alex. Brown & Sons, died Thursday from metastatic melanoma at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 76. Born and raised in New York City, the son of an Empire Trust Co. bank teller and a homemaker, he was a 1950 graduate of Fordham Preparatory School. After serving in the Army as a private from 1952 to 1954, he went to work at the Federal Reserve Bank and Smith Barney & Co. in New York City, and while attending Fordham University at night, earned a bachelor's degree in 1958.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Ruby E. Garrett, a retired Baltimore public school educator who stressed the importance of a college education to her students, died of heart failure Wednesday at her Lochearn home. She was 78. She was born and raised Ruby Edith Tobias in Newberry County, South Carolina. She earned a bachelor's degree in business education in 1953 from Allen University in Columbia, S.C., came to Baltimore in 1954 and began teaching adults in the city schools' Concentrated Employment Program, which was in the old Polytechnic Institute on North Avenue.
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By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
At the turn of the century, the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion was the center of Baltimore's social scene.Now, the Engineering Society of Baltimore, which owns the building, cannot afford to repair the city's largest townhouse. So, in an effort to raise $5 million for renovations, the group announced yesterday the formation of the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion Endowment Fund."If we could bring the building up to the 20th century, it would be an economical building and a beautiful building," said Jay Hanna, the society's president.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Ruby E. Garrett, a retired Baltimore public school educator who stressed the importance of a college education to her students, died of heart failure Wednesday at her Lochearn home. She was 78. She was born and raised Ruby Edith Tobias in Newberry County, South Carolina. She earned a bachelor's degree in business education in 1953 from Allen University in Columbia, S.C., came to Baltimore in 1954 and began teaching adults in the city schools' Concentrated Employment Program, which was in the old Polytechnic Institute on North Avenue.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
William F. Schmick Jr. was incorrectly identified in an obituary on Harrison Garrett in yesterday's editions. The Sun regrets the error.Harrison Garrett, a retired investment banker, philanthropist and member of one of Maryland's most prominent families, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at his Brooklandville home. He was 82.He retired in 1974 as chairman of the board of Robert Garrett & Sons, ending a career that began in 1946 at the Baltimore-based investment banking firm that was founded in 1840 and bore his great-great grandfather's name.
NEWS
February 22, 1996
John Koppelman, 78, investment bankerJohn Van Cortlandt Koppelman, a former investment banker who worked in a firm founded by his father, died Feb. 3 of Parkinson's disease at Keswick. He was 78 and lived in western Baltimore County.He was a graduate of the Gilman School and Princeton University. He enlisted in the Army in 1941 and served in the 110th Field Artillery until his discharge in 1946.He then worked in his father's investment firm, Walter Koppelman & Co., and at Robert Garrett & Sons as an investment banker.
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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 14, 2005
An open-air courtyard off Mount Vernon Place will be enclosed under a glass and steel roof as part of a $5 million plan to increase and upgrade the meeting space at Baltimore's historic Garrett-Jacobs Mansion. The Engineering Society of Baltimore, which owns and operates the mansion at 7-11 W. Mount Vernon Place, also wants to restore several of its "period" rooms, build an addition containing an elevator, restrooms, commercial-grade kitchen and barrier-free entrance, and possibly add upper-level guest rooms.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
Katharine G. Bainbridge, who drove an ambulance on the front lines during the early days of World War II and was an eyewitness to the fall of France, died Wednesday of cancer at Genesis Eldercare Center in Lutherville. She was 84.A Baltimore socialite who was born and raised in Homeland, she was the daughter of Robert Garrett, prominent philanthropist and financier, who was associated with the Baltimore banking house of Robert Garrett & Co., which had been founded by his great-grandfather.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
Anne B. Mulligan, an actress known for her portrayals of strict nuns and eccentric aunts in more than two decades of stage performances in area theaters, died of a heart attack Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Towson resident was 72. Born Anne Luecke in Staten Island, N.Y., she did secretarial work before marrying and moving to Baltimore in 1961 with her husband, Richard F. Mulligan, manager of the municipal bond department at Robert Garrett & Sons. After raising her five children, a divorce, volunteer work and a job with the North Baltimore Community Mental Health Center, she decided to fulfill an ambition of getting a college degree.
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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
Herbert Appleton Wagner Jr., a retired business owner who during World War II joined Britain's Royal Air Force and survived being shot down over the English Channel, died of renal failure Saturday at his Owings Mills home. He was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised in Green Spring Valley near Owings Mills, he was the son of the president of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the old Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis Railroad. He attended Calvert School and was a 1939 graduate of Gilman School, where he played football.
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By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Harold L. Xanders, a stockbroker and lifelong resident of Green Spring Valley, died Thursday of congestive heart failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 79. Mr. Xanders grew up in the house that is now the headmaster's residence for Garrison Forest School in Owings Mills and as an adult lived in two homes on Garrison Forest Road. He excelled in athletics at the Gilman School, where he played baseball and tennis and was an all-state quarterback and wrestler in the early 1940s.
NEWS
August 21, 2005
Robert Lee Garrett, a retired foreman at Bethlehem Steel Corp., died of cancer Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Lochearn resident was 75. Born and raised in McClellanville, S.C., Mr. Garrett served in the Army as a radar operator in the early 1950s. After his discharge, he moved to Baltimore for a steel company job in Sparrows Point. He retired in 1985. Services are at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Falls Road African Methodist Episcopal Church, 2145 Pine Ave., Hebbville. Survivors include his wife of 38 years, the former Ruby E. Tobias, a retired Baltimore city schoolteacher; and a brother, James Garrett of New York.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
P. Raab Christhilf grows more and more enthusiastic every time he turns over a new sketch or watercolor of the Victorian furniture and interior design from the collection of the Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co. Christhilf loves this stuff. He's the fine arts appraiser for Alex Cooper Auctioneers, which is selling the collection tomorrow. The plans and drawings coming out of 26 dark gray archival boxes illustrate the taste of the richest generation of Baltimoreans, the generation that flowered in the late 19th century.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 14, 2005
An open-air courtyard off Mount Vernon Place will be enclosed under a glass and steel roof as part of a $5 million plan to increase and upgrade the meeting space at Baltimore's historic Garrett-Jacobs Mansion. The Engineering Society of Baltimore, which owns and operates the mansion at 7-11 W. Mount Vernon Place, also wants to restore several of its "period" rooms, build an addition containing an elevator, restrooms, commercial-grade kitchen and barrier-free entrance, and possibly add upper-level guest rooms.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
Herbert Appleton Wagner Jr., a retired business owner who during World War II joined Britain's Royal Air Force and survived being shot down over the English Channel, died of renal failure Saturday at his Owings Mills home. He was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised in Green Spring Valley near Owings Mills, he was the son of the president of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the old Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis Railroad. He attended Calvert School and was a 1939 graduate of Gilman School, where he played football.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Harold L. Xanders, a stockbroker and lifelong resident of Green Spring Valley, died Thursday of congestive heart failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 79. Mr. Xanders grew up in the house that is now the headmaster's residence for Garrison Forest School in Owings Mills and as an adult lived in two homes on Garrison Forest Road. He excelled in athletics at the Gilman School, where he played baseball and tennis and was an all-state quarterback and wrestler in the early 1940s.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2004
Robert Garrett, scion of a wealthy and influential Baltimore banking and railroad family who became a businessman and philanthropist, was known as the "last first Olympian." He earned that distinction because at his death in 1961, he was the sole survivor of the 13 U.S. athletes who had traveled to Athens in 1896 for the first of the modern Olympic Games. He was 86 at his death. Garrett was born in 1875 in Baltimore County, the son of Thomas Harrison Garrett and Alice Whitridge Garrett.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Memorial Day is the day we as a country remember the sacrifices made by the men and women who have fought and fallen in the nation's wars. World War II veterans are dying at a rate of some 1,500 a day, while it is estimated that fewer than 500 veterans from World War I are living. And as those who fought in the "Great War" fade from view, the opportunity to read the unpublished and poignant memoirs of a young Baltimore field artilleryman from those years is a rare and distinct pleasure.
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