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Robert Gallo

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NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 18, 1995
The New Majority in Congress wants to get gummint regulators out of business and on to the Internet.Everybody is for throwing state money at Robert Gallo, except scientists who ought to know.North Avenue reformers are shaking up zoned high schools. They may not be doing the right things, but they are doing the right places.The Pentagon plays war games, the NSA plays mind games.
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NEWS
October 8, 2008
Sir Isaac Newton, the pioneer of modern physics, once said he was able to achieve what he had because he stood on the shoulders of giants. In science, as in sports, great things often are accomplished through the collective effort of many individuals. The discovery in 1983 of the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS was such an achievement, and this week two French researchers, Dr. Luc Montagnier and Dr.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John R. Alden and John R. Alden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
Science Fictions: A Scientific Mystery, A Massive Cover-up, and the Dark Legacy of Robert Gallo, by John Crewdson. Little, Brown. 670 pages. $27.95. Fifteen years ago, Robert Gallo was a star. A researcher at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., he was famed as the discoverer of HTLV-3, the virus that causes AIDS. Gallo was collecting $100,000 a year from the key patent on the test for this virus, and he - and everyone else in the medical world - figured he would win the Nobel Prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John R. Alden and John R. Alden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
Science Fictions: A Scientific Mystery, A Massive Cover-up, and the Dark Legacy of Robert Gallo, by John Crewdson. Little, Brown. 670 pages. $27.95. Fifteen years ago, Robert Gallo was a star. A researcher at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., he was famed as the discoverer of HTLV-3, the virus that causes AIDS. Gallo was collecting $100,000 a year from the key patent on the test for this virus, and he - and everyone else in the medical world - figured he would win the Nobel Prize.
NEWS
July 17, 1996
OPTIMISM DOMINATED the recent gathering of 15,000 AIDS scientists and health professionals in Vancouver, British Columbia, and for good reason. For the first time, there is more than a glimmer of hope that the damage done by the HIV virus can be dramatically reduced to the point that death is not an inevitable consequence.Still, there is no cure. But some of the research holds enormous promise to turn AIDS into a manageable, treatable condition. The most notable advance is a three-drug "cocktail" that includes a "protease inhibitor" to block an enzyme critical to the reproduction of the HIV virus.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
Once bitter rivals, two of the world's best-known AIDS researchers shook hands and formed a partnership yesterday to try to raise millions of dollars and conduct AIDS vaccine trials. Dr. Luc Montagnier, whose lab in Paris discovered the virus that causes AIDS in 1983, and Dr. Robert Gallo, a former competitor who helped to develop a blood test for the disease, hope to test five potential AIDS vaccines in Baltimore, Africa and elsewhere. During a news conference at the State House in Annapolis, Gallo said that Montagnier would become an adjunct professor at Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at University of Maryland, Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
Once bitter rivals, two of the world's best-known AIDS researchers shook hands and formed a partnership yesterday to try to raise millions of dollars and conduct AIDS vaccine trials. Dr. Luc Montagnier, whose lab in Paris discovered the virus that causes AIDS in 1983, and Dr. Robert Gallo, a former competitor who helped to develop a blood test for the disease, hope to test five potential AIDS vaccines in Baltimore, Africa and elsewhere. During a news conference at the State House in Annapolis, Gallo said that Montagnier would become an adjunct professor at Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Tom Pelton and Story by Tom Pelton,Sun Staff | May 7, 2000
Walk down Linwood Avenue in Canton and you'll hear the past and future of Baltimore banging up against each other as clearly as people hear their neighbors' barking poodles and cell phones through the walls of these 14-foot-wide rowhouses. On Linwood, with its view of barges slipping past in the steel-gray harbor, you can feel the conflicts and ironies of gentrification in this blue-collar neighborhood, where wealthy professionals are flocking to a landscape of failed canneries and fertilizer plants.
NEWS
October 8, 2008
Sir Isaac Newton, the pioneer of modern physics, once said he was able to achieve what he had because he stood on the shoulders of giants. In science, as in sports, great things often are accomplished through the collective effort of many individuals. The discovery in 1983 of the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS was such an achievement, and this week two French researchers, Dr. Luc Montagnier and Dr.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
Two years after state leaders began their courtship of Dr. Robert C. Gallo, the renowned AIDS researcher will formally open his deluxe research center tomorrow on the University of Maryland's campus in Baltimore.The Institute of Human Virology will be dedicated with a banquet and two days of lectures featuring a lineup of scientific luminaries.When the ceremonies are over, Maryland's taxpayers will have a chance to see whether Gallo can build the economic engine that Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke envisioned when they committed $12 million over three years to launch the center.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
Once bitter rivals, two of the world's best-known AIDS researchers shook hands and formed a partnership yesterday to try to raise millions of dollars and conduct AIDS vaccine trials. Dr. Luc Montagnier, whose lab in Paris discovered the virus that causes AIDS in 1983, and Dr. Robert Gallo, a former competitor who helped to develop a blood test for the disease, hope to test five potential AIDS vaccines in Baltimore, Africa and elsewhere. During a news conference at the State House in Annapolis, Gallo said that Montagnier would become an adjunct professor at Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
Once bitter rivals, two of the world's best-known AIDS researchers shook hands and formed a partnership yesterday to try to raise millions of dollars and conduct AIDS vaccine trials. Dr. Luc Montagnier, whose lab in Paris discovered the virus that causes AIDS in 1983, and Dr. Robert Gallo, a former competitor who helped to develop a blood test for the disease, hope to test five potential AIDS vaccines in Baltimore, Africa and elsewhere. During a news conference at the State House in Annapolis, Gallo said that Montagnier would become an adjunct professor at Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at University of Maryland, Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Tom Pelton and Story by Tom Pelton,Sun Staff | May 7, 2000
Walk down Linwood Avenue in Canton and you'll hear the past and future of Baltimore banging up against each other as clearly as people hear their neighbors' barking poodles and cell phones through the walls of these 14-foot-wide rowhouses. On Linwood, with its view of barges slipping past in the steel-gray harbor, you can feel the conflicts and ironies of gentrification in this blue-collar neighborhood, where wealthy professionals are flocking to a landscape of failed canneries and fertilizer plants.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
Two years after state leaders began their courtship of Dr. Robert C. Gallo, the renowned AIDS researcher will formally open his deluxe research center tomorrow on the University of Maryland's campus in Baltimore.The Institute of Human Virology will be dedicated with a banquet and two days of lectures featuring a lineup of scientific luminaries.When the ceremonies are over, Maryland's taxpayers will have a chance to see whether Gallo can build the economic engine that Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke envisioned when they committed $12 million over three years to launch the center.
NEWS
July 17, 1996
OPTIMISM DOMINATED the recent gathering of 15,000 AIDS scientists and health professionals in Vancouver, British Columbia, and for good reason. For the first time, there is more than a glimmer of hope that the damage done by the HIV virus can be dramatically reduced to the point that death is not an inevitable consequence.Still, there is no cure. But some of the research holds enormous promise to turn AIDS into a manageable, treatable condition. The most notable advance is a three-drug "cocktail" that includes a "protease inhibitor" to block an enzyme critical to the reproduction of the HIV virus.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 18, 1995
The New Majority in Congress wants to get gummint regulators out of business and on to the Internet.Everybody is for throwing state money at Robert Gallo, except scientists who ought to know.North Avenue reformers are shaking up zoned high schools. They may not be doing the right things, but they are doing the right places.The Pentagon plays war games, the NSA plays mind games.
NEWS
February 11, 1995
Due to a problem in typesetting, there was a garbled line in the Friday editorial "Brady for Maryland's Economy." The line should have read that a top priority for James T. Brady's economic-development team is persuading Dr. Robert C. Gallo "to locate a world-class virology laboratory at the University of Maryland instead of Virginia."The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
January 1, 1995
In Thursday's editions, an article about Dr. Robert C. Gallo, one of the world's leading AIDS researchers, misstated the relationship between the new Columbus Center and the University of Maryland. The Columbus Center is owned and operated by Columbus Center Development Inc., a private, non-profit organization. When Columbus Center opens, it will house the relocated Center of Marine Biotechnology, which is part of the university.The Sun regrets the errors.
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