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By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | April 14, 1993
Edward Crook, Kile Crook to his readers, never wanted to be famous. He never wanted to be a secret, either."I wanted to hide myself, and yet I didn't want to hide. I only wanted to achieve self-expression," the 97-year old poet said yesterday from his home at the Annapolis Convalescent Center.But Mr. Crook couldn't escape the eye of poet Robert Hillyer. In 1936, Mr. Hillyer sponsored Mr. Crook at the Bread Loaf Conference Writer's Convention, introducing the works of Kile Crook to a distinguished poets panel that included Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay and others.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 8, 2011
(The following is inspired by "Birches," with apologies to Robert Frost.) When I see teenagers to the left and right In the woods by the river off Pulaski Highway, I like to think they're about to embrace the spring. Spring brings them out of school, out of their clothes And into the woods by the river. I saw them, boys in shorts, girls in bikinis, Easter Monday, After a rain, in the sun, heading for the river. Soon the sun's warmth made them shed their shirts And into the Gunpowder they went, beneath a bridge.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
FRANCONIA, N.H. -- Whose woods are these? I think I know. They belong to Robert Frost. Tacked to oaks and maples behind the white clapboard farmhouse Frost once called home are 16 wooden plaques that bear the words of his most famous poems and act as markers along a half-mile nature trail. They were put there by the people of this tiny White Mountains town three hours north of Boston, who, in a flash of patriotism and hometown pride, decided to preserve Frost's memory and celebrate his art form.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 7, 2008
The City Council of Baltimore might not be ready to ban single-use plastic shopping bags, but I am. I'm done. I don't know when this happened exactly, but I reached some sort of tipping point with plastic bags a few weeks ago. Now I can't stand them. Some people don't want to see Kyle Boller as the Ravens' quarterback anymore. I don't want to see plastic bags. Of course, going cold turkey requires asking for paper at the supermarket - not a great option - or toting reusable bags into the store with you. A lot of people, especially males, struggle with this.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999
Robert Frost(1874-1963)Frost is remembered favorably for his poems with settings in rural New England. He is considered a major American poet of the 20th century.In England, he wrote, "A Boy's Will" and "North of Boston." By the time he came back to the United States his reputation preceded him.Two of Frost's most notable poems are "The Road Not Taken" and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening". He later taught at various universities in the United States-- Benet's Reader's Encyclopedia of American LiteraturePub Date: 05/16/99
NEWS
By Thomas N. Longstreth | September 9, 1994
(with apologies to that old-time baseball fan, Robert Frost) Whose fields these are I think I know.They've all gone home in anger, though;They will not see us stopping hereTo watch their fields while they no-show.The little kids must think it queerTo end without the Series near,And know not what old records breakIn this stupendous hitting year.They give their parents' arms a shakeTo ask if there is some mistakeThe only other sound's the sweepOf falling leaves and fan-tailed rake.The baseball people's greed is deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 11, 2004
Farewell, Godspeed: The Greatest Eulogies of Our Time, edited by Cyrus M. Copeland. Harmony Books. 336 pages. $18.95. At first blush -- first chill? -- the idea may seem lugubrious, the contents depressing. Sixty-four funereal tributes to notable women and men of the last couple of generations are an awful lot of sadness. But no. The departeds range from Karl Marx (by Friedrich Engels) to Virginia Woolf (by Christopher Isherwood), from Henry Ford (by Edgar A. Guest) to Robert Frost (by John F. Kennedy)
NEWS
By MARY HARRIS RUSSELL and MARY HARRIS RUSSELL,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 4, 2006
Museum Trip Barbara Lehman Just Listen Sarah Dessen Viking / $17.99 / Ages 13-16 For many teenagers, your music-listening choices and the CDs you burn for friends show who you are. Sarah Dessen gets right to the heart of music, families and teenage identity. She begins the book quoting Robert Frost - "The best way out is always through" - and creates a stage on which that truth appears. Annabel is the youngest of three daughters, all of whom model because their mother enjoys that world.
NEWS
By ELISABETH STEVENS | October 5, 1997
Because I am a writer who's been published by small presses, I tend to read books by university and small presses. Those publishers are giving something - some great literary works - we can't get elsewhere.I'm re-reading Josephine Jacobsen's "Collected Works," which is published by Johns Hopkins University Press. ... There's one story I particularly like, "Nel bagno." It's about a women who's going on a trip but gets stuck in a bathroom before she departs. There's this moment when she realizes that everyone will think she's already left, so no one will rescue her. It's an intense story; it really shows Jacobsen's talent.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2003
"The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound -- that he will never get over it," Robert Frost said. The lovers of the printed and spoken word who populate the ranks of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society undoubtedly would agree. It is in the spirit of those immortal wounds that HoCoPoLitSo will celebrate its 30th anniversary tomorrow by honoring the memory of one of its dearest friends, the nationally known poet Josephine Jacobsen, who died in July at age 94. "She was very encouraging and generous with us," said the society's founding director, Ellen Conroy Kennedy, remembering the poet's many readings in Columbia.
NEWS
By MARY HARRIS RUSSELL and MARY HARRIS RUSSELL,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 4, 2006
Museum Trip Barbara Lehman Just Listen Sarah Dessen Viking / $17.99 / Ages 13-16 For many teenagers, your music-listening choices and the CDs you burn for friends show who you are. Sarah Dessen gets right to the heart of music, families and teenage identity. She begins the book quoting Robert Frost - "The best way out is always through" - and creates a stage on which that truth appears. Annabel is the youngest of three daughters, all of whom model because their mother enjoys that world.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | April 1, 2005
APRIL IS NATIONAL Poetry Month. This means poets on postage stamps, poem-a-day e-mails and poets-in-the-schools are working overtime. But if talking about poetry makes you shudder, you're not alone. For many people, the thought of poetry brings back memories of seventh grade. If we were lucky, we had an English teacher who loved poetry so much that when he or she read poems aloud we could viscerally experience the power of words meeting air. But there were other teachers who made us memorize Old English or deconstruct poems about marriage and mortality, topics not exactly top-of-mind for 12-year-olds.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - Robert Frost wrote poetry for John F. Kennedy's inauguration. Pity he never got to read it. Sunshine, reflecting off piles of fresh snow, blinded the famed poet. So he just recited an oldie he knew by heart. In 1861, Abraham Lincoln had to be smuggled through Baltimore under dark of night to make it safely to his swearing-in. He was trying to evade Confederate sympathizers who wanted to kill him. Lincoln lived to see a second inauguration, in 1865. He may have wished he hadn't; his vice president, Andrew Johnson, embarrassed him by giving a speech drunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 11, 2004
Farewell, Godspeed: The Greatest Eulogies of Our Time, edited by Cyrus M. Copeland. Harmony Books. 336 pages. $18.95. At first blush -- first chill? -- the idea may seem lugubrious, the contents depressing. Sixty-four funereal tributes to notable women and men of the last couple of generations are an awful lot of sadness. But no. The departeds range from Karl Marx (by Friedrich Engels) to Virginia Woolf (by Christopher Isherwood), from Henry Ford (by Edgar A. Guest) to Robert Frost (by John F. Kennedy)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2003
"The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound -- that he will never get over it," Robert Frost said. The lovers of the printed and spoken word who populate the ranks of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society undoubtedly would agree. It is in the spirit of those immortal wounds that HoCoPoLitSo will celebrate its 30th anniversary tomorrow by honoring the memory of one of its dearest friends, the nationally known poet Josephine Jacobsen, who died in July at age 94. "She was very encouraging and generous with us," said the society's founding director, Ellen Conroy Kennedy, remembering the poet's many readings in Columbia.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2002
FRANCONIA, N.H. -- Whose woods are these? I think I know. They belong to Robert Frost. Tacked to oaks and maples behind the white clapboard farmhouse Frost once called home are 16 wooden plaques that bear the words of his most famous poems and act as markers along a half-mile nature trail. They were put there by the people of this tiny White Mountains town three hours north of Boston, who, in a flash of patriotism and hometown pride, decided to preserve Frost's memory and celebrate his art form.
FEATURES
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1994
We think of our major cities as metropolises -- New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle -- and by that measure, Boston doesn't begin to qualify. It is relatively small by population and economic clout. It has bounce but not much bounce-back; and the booms and rebirths it manages, from time to time, dissipate as inevitably as early season Red Sox leads.Yet Boston has an undeniable hold on the nation's imagination. There is history's nostalgia, of course; there are the universities and the tidal vigor of tens of thousands of students washing in from all over the world and washing out again.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | April 1, 2005
APRIL IS NATIONAL Poetry Month. This means poets on postage stamps, poem-a-day e-mails and poets-in-the-schools are working overtime. But if talking about poetry makes you shudder, you're not alone. For many people, the thought of poetry brings back memories of seventh grade. If we were lucky, we had an English teacher who loved poetry so much that when he or she read poems aloud we could viscerally experience the power of words meeting air. But there were other teachers who made us memorize Old English or deconstruct poems about marriage and mortality, topics not exactly top-of-mind for 12-year-olds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2001
"Milosz's ABC's," by Czeslaw Milosz, translated from the Polish by Madeline Levine. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 312 pages. $24. Any work by Poland's most famous living poet excites anticipation. The 1980 Nobel laureate has not only produced stunningly beautiful verse but a perceptive study of the spiritual life of human beings under communism in "The Captive Mind" (1953). He has also been a generous promoter of other people's works, particularly by younger Eastern European poets Unlike earlier, organic works, "Milosz's ABC's" is a synthetic rearrangement of the poet's philosophic and literary notebooks according to a strict alphabetical order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 17, 2000
John Updike started writing as an undergraduate on the Harvard Lampoon. His early comic writing -- he drew cartoons, too -- gained him attention and satisfaction. He was hired by the New Yorker and published 16 short stories there between 1954 and 1959.They came out as a volume called "The Same Door" in 1959, a year after "The Carpentered Hen and Other Tame Creatures," a collection of poems that was his first book. Updike's first great smash was "Rabbit, Run," which he wrote in 1959 in considerably less than a year, with no intention that it was going to have sequels.
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