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By Janene Holzberg | November 19, 2013
In 1951, fresh out of engineering school, Robert E. Fischell was taking a shortcut across the lawn at the Washington-area offices of his first employer when he tripped on a sprinkler head. “I immediately envisioned pop-up lawn sprinklers, though I had no idea how to get a patent” and never gave it another thought, he says. Eight years after literally stumbling on that idea, he was working at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in North Laurel when a similar scenario unfolded.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | November 19, 2013
In 1951, fresh out of engineering school, Robert E. Fischell was taking a shortcut across the lawn at the Washington-area offices of his first employer when he tripped on a sprinkler head. “I immediately envisioned pop-up lawn sprinklers, though I had no idea how to get a patent” and never gave it another thought, he says. Eight years after literally stumbling on that idea, he was working at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in North Laurel when a similar scenario unfolded.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
The first time Howard County inventor Dr. Robert Fischell experienced a migraine symptom known as an aura, he had no clue what was happening. Images of dancing circles crowded his vision, and when the circles grew larger, he thought he was about to have a stroke. Suddenly, the aura stopped and to Fischell's surprise, and relief, no ailment followed. "Oh, thank God," he said. Now the maker of the first implantable insulin pump, the rechargeable pacemaker and various coronary stents has invented a hand-held device that targets the aura en route to stopping a migraine - a painful, sometimes debilitating headache disorder - before it starts.
NEWS
By Robert E. Fischell | May 14, 2013
Government leaders are asking us to out-innovate, out-export and out-work our competitors in order for the United States to turn this economy around. But what if our own government was instituting policies that proved to be some of the biggest obstacles in achieving those goals? For more than four decades, I have dedicated my life to developing novel medical technologies, such as implantable insulin pumps, rechargeable implantable pacemakers, heart stents and more. These therapies have improved the health and saved the lives of millions of patients in America and throughout the world, and spurred the creation of tens of thousands of jobs.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 3, 2006
The walls in Robert Fischell's home office in Howard County are filled with framed patents from home and abroad, a testament to a man whose mind is up and running in the wee-morning hours conceiving lifesaving medical devices. The 76-year-old inventor opens a briefcase atop his desk and displays some of his latest handiwork, devices he says will do more for modern medicine than his previous breakthroughs. Yet what could be greater than the first implantable insulin pump, the rechargeable pacemaker and flexible stents for coronary arteries?
NEWS
By Robert E. Fischell | May 14, 2013
Government leaders are asking us to out-innovate, out-export and out-work our competitors in order for the United States to turn this economy around. But what if our own government was instituting policies that proved to be some of the biggest obstacles in achieving those goals? For more than four decades, I have dedicated my life to developing novel medical technologies, such as implantable insulin pumps, rechargeable implantable pacemakers, heart stents and more. These therapies have improved the health and saved the lives of millions of patients in America and throughout the world, and spurred the creation of tens of thousands of jobs.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | December 19, 2005
The University of Maryland, College Park plans to announce today a gift of $30 million to support new initiatives in biomedical engineering at the university's A. James Clark School of Engineering. The gift, from medical device inventor and UM alumnus Robert Fischell, will establish the Fischell Department of Bioengineering and the Fischell Institute for Biomedical Devices, both within the Clark School. Fischell's three sons are together giving an additional $1 million. "The finest goal that engineering can achieve is to improve the quality of life for people throughout the world," Fischell said in a statement.
NEWS
January 3, 2006
NATIONAL 13 trapped in W.Va. coal mine After waiting almost 12 hours for dangerous gases to clear, rescuers entered a West Virginia coal mine where an explosion that might have been caused by intense lightning trapped 13 miners underground. The condition of the miners was not known last night. The blast knocked out the mine's communication equipment, preventing authorities from contacting the miners. pg 1a Rain eases in Northern Calif. The rain let up over flooded Northern California wine country yesterday and moved into the central and southern portions of the state, drenching the Rose Parade for the first time since 1955 and threatening mudslides on hills stripped bare by last summer's wildfires.
NEWS
By Margaret Buchler and Margaret Buchler,Contributing writer | November 17, 1991
It was a time when the public's imagination walked on long legs, and"wond'rous curiosities" like mummies, mermaid skeletons and electricity were exhibited by showmen like P. T. Barnum.The early 1800s were the era of the Peale family, headed by Charles Willson Peale, inventor, artist and collector of nature's wonders. His son, Rembrandt Peale, founded Baltimore's Peale Museum in 1814, now the oldest museumbuilding in the Western Hemisphere.Thirteen Howard County elementary students got a glimpse of the Peales' zealous curiosity last month when they entered the museum's pilot program, "Great Expectations."
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley received a public service award last night from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. O'Malley was singled out for his efforts as mayor of Baltimore to tackle the city's persistent crime problem and its struggling school system. The organization also lauded O'Malley's creation of CitiStat, calling it "a highly useful accountability tool that later won Harvard University's prestigious Innovations in American Government award." Other honorees were Robert E. Fischell of Angel Medical Systems, and Steve Geppi, a local businessman and minority owner of the Orioles who received a corporate citizenship award.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
The first time Howard County inventor Dr. Robert Fischell experienced a migraine symptom known as an aura, he had no clue what was happening. Images of dancing circles crowded his vision, and when the circles grew larger, he thought he was about to have a stroke. Suddenly, the aura stopped and to Fischell's surprise, and relief, no ailment followed. "Oh, thank God," he said. Now the maker of the first implantable insulin pump, the rechargeable pacemaker and various coronary stents has invented a hand-held device that targets the aura en route to stopping a migraine - a painful, sometimes debilitating headache disorder - before it starts.
FEATURES
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 3, 2006
The walls in Robert Fischell's home office in Howard County are filled with framed patents from home and abroad, a testament to a man whose mind is up and running in the wee-morning hours conceiving lifesaving medical devices. The 76-year-old inventor opens a briefcase atop his desk and displays some of his latest handiwork, devices he says will do more for modern medicine than his previous breakthroughs. Yet what could be greater than the first implantable insulin pump, the rechargeable pacemaker and flexible stents for coronary arteries?
FEATURES
May 10, 1992
Tiffany Gordon, a student at Bryn Mawr School, was one of 100 students nationwide selected as a scholarship recipient in the 1992 Japan-U.S. Senate Scholarship Program. She will spend six weeks with a host family in Japan as part of an exchange program for U.S. high school students.*Kelley Lynn Bellinger, a senior at South Carroll High School, has been awarded a presidential scholarship by the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.*Brenda Logue, Towson State University director of forensics, was awarded the 1992 Brownlee Outstanding Debate Coach Award.
NEWS
Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The $31 million donation to the University of Maryland, College Park on Friday from a computer tech millionaire was the largest donation in the history of the university, but there have been others nearly as big. The university has received three $30 million gifts from three individuals in recent years: Robert E. Fischell, a physicist and inventor, gave money to establish the department of bioengineering; A. James Clark, a construction company owner,...
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