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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 6, 1998
"The Apostle" is as evocative and detailed a vision of the American South as any to appear on screen in recent years. But it makes its impact primarily as a piece of music. Rich and sonorous, the film swells with the music of sermonizing and shooting the breeze, the characters' words playing off each other to a tuneful lilt."The Apostle," which Robert Duvall wrote, directed, produced and stars in, will surely be remembered best for his performance, which tops an already prodigious career.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | September 23, 2008
Starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, Robert Duvall / Directed by Francis Ford Coppola / Paramount / $69.99 (blu-ray, $124.99) dvds One of the greatest, most influential and most popular movies of all time, as well as its equally audacious sequel, get the red-carpet treatment, thanks to a couple years of hard work from film restoration expert Robert Harris. The result is stunning, with a depth of colors that hasn't been seen in more than 30 years. Fans of The Godfather and The Godfather: Part II will revel in the films' newfound glory.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 25, 2006
ROBERT DUVALL MIGHT BE GOING A little overboard when he says, "The Russians have Chekhov, and the English have Shakespeare; we have the Western." But if the Academy Award-winning actor and producer was overstating the literary importance of America's most durable genre, it wasn't by much: Despite recurring predictions of the Western's demise, tonight's prime-time lineup will feature a new episode of HBO's graphic and operatic series Deadwood. And at the same time, AMC 's first original movie, Broken Trail, a spellbinding frontier epic starring Duvall and directed by Walter Hill (Geronimo: An American Legend)
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By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 25, 2006
ROBERT DUVALL MIGHT BE GOING A little overboard when he says, "The Russians have Chekhov, and the English have Shakespeare; we have the Western." But if the Academy Award-winning actor and producer was overstating the literary importance of America's most durable genre, it wasn't by much: Despite recurring predictions of the Western's demise, tonight's prime-time lineup will feature a new episode of HBO's graphic and operatic series Deadwood. And at the same time, AMC 's first original movie, Broken Trail, a spellbinding frontier epic starring Duvall and directed by Walter Hill (Geronimo: An American Legend)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
Tonight's CBS movie is not great, maybe, but Robert Duvall's good ol' boy mechanic in "Days of Thunder" is well worth watching. A cable documentary also takes an alarming look at the spread of deadly viruses.* "The Best of Maryland State of Mind" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- This special highlights previous stories aired in a quarterly series that Maryland Public Television produces with the University of Maryland System. Host Scott Simon, of National Public Radio, introduces stories that range from robots being designed for space to Towson State University's dance company, which tutors football players in the graceful art. MPT.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Garth and Hub McCann are the kind of uncles we all wish we had. And Secondhand Lions, the story of a summer spent as reluctant mentors to a great-nephew they didn't know they had, is the kind of movie we all hope for. Entertaining, thrilling and honestly sentimental, it's an equal-opportunity crowd-pleaser: Kids will love the adventure aspects, adults will like the memories it evokes of the fun relatives they grew up adoring, and everyone should appreciate...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 10, 1992
"Newsies" is a live-action musical, but it's only barely alive. Call it "Snoozies."How good an idea was this, anyhow? "Hey, kids, let's put on a musical about a strike." What is it, "Pajama Game" for the Li'l Rascals? Actually it is based on an authentic event, the strike by newspaper boys against New York press lords Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst back in 1899. But the "1899" of "Newsies" is that old familiar place, the quaint and gentrified past so beloved of the Disney sensibility, where everything has been artificially aged until it has that tasty theme-park look, as if it's set in the fabled New York borough of Orlando.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 10, 1992
"Newsies" is a live-action musical, but it's only barely alive. Call it "Snoozies."How good an idea was this, anyhow? "Hey, kids, let's put on a musical about a strike." What is it, "Pajama Game" for the Li'l Rascals? Actually it is based on an authentic event, the strike by newspaper boys against New York press lords Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst back in 1899. But the "1899" of "Newsies" is that old familiar place, the quaint and gentrified past so beloved of the Disney sensibility, where everything has been artificially aged until it has that tasty theme-park look, as if it's set in the fabled New York borough of Orlando.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2003
Look for reviews of this week's new films in the Today section. Camp This film follows a handful of hopeful teen-age musical-comedy performers through a summer of heartbreak and triumph at Camp Ovation; the cast includes local talents Joanna Chilcoat and Tiffany Taylor. PG-13. Charles exclusive. Dirty Pretty Things Audrey Tautou is showcased as a Turkish chambermaid in a West London hotel that turns out to be the center of a horrifying crime. R. Rotunda exclusive. Freddy vs. Jason The virtuoso slashers of the Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th horror franchises are pitted against each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2005
Look for reviews in tomorrow's Today section. Kicking and Screaming Will Ferrell stars as a mild-mannered children's soccer coach who becomes caught up in a competitive frenzy when he ends up in an emotion-charged duel with a rival coach - his own father (Robert Duvall) - for a league championship. PG. Look at Me This acclaimed French comedy-drama is about a girl with a lousy self-image struggling to please her egotistical writer-publisher father. PG-13. Charles exclusive. Mindhunters Jonny Lee Miller, Kathryn Morris and Christian Slater star in a thriller about trainees in the FBI psychological profiling program who must catch a serial killer in their own ranks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2005
Look for reviews in tomorrow's Today section. Kicking and Screaming Will Ferrell stars as a mild-mannered children's soccer coach who becomes caught up in a competitive frenzy when he ends up in an emotion-charged duel with a rival coach - his own father (Robert Duvall) - for a league championship. PG. Look at Me This acclaimed French comedy-drama is about a girl with a lousy self-image struggling to please her egotistical writer-publisher father. PG-13. Charles exclusive. Mindhunters Jonny Lee Miller, Kathryn Morris and Christian Slater star in a thriller about trainees in the FBI psychological profiling program who must catch a serial killer in their own ranks.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Garth and Hub McCann are the kind of uncles we all wish we had. And Secondhand Lions, the story of a summer spent as reluctant mentors to a great-nephew they didn't know they had, is the kind of movie we all hope for. Entertaining, thrilling and honestly sentimental, it's an equal-opportunity crowd-pleaser: Kids will love the adventure aspects, adults will like the memories it evokes of the fun relatives they grew up adoring, and everyone should appreciate...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2003
Look for reviews of this week's new films in the Today section. Camp This film follows a handful of hopeful teen-age musical-comedy performers through a summer of heartbreak and triumph at Camp Ovation; the cast includes local talents Joanna Chilcoat and Tiffany Taylor. PG-13. Charles exclusive. Dirty Pretty Things Audrey Tautou is showcased as a Turkish chambermaid in a West London hotel that turns out to be the center of a horrifying crime. R. Rotunda exclusive. Freddy vs. Jason The virtuoso slashers of the Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th horror franchises are pitted against each other.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2003
MIAMI BEACH - You'd never know it to look at the work - often quiet, introverted, built on small moments. But Robert Duvall is an actor ruled by his passions. It doesn't reveal itself in every job. He's still a sucker for anything with a horse. He's related to Robert E. Lee, so he ignored doubts he had about playing Lee in the flop Gods and Generals. For every Tender Mercies, combining his love of country music with his favorite screenwriter, Horton Foote, Duvall will have to play a cop (Falling Down)
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 29, 2002
HARPER'S FERRY, W.Va. - Richard La Motte stands, eyes narrowed, on the edge of a movie set. The hills cradling this historic town rise and fall in gentle swells around him, and the trees cling to the reds and golds of an unusually warm autumn. But in the scene from Gods and Generals, the Civil War movie unfolding before him, it is supposed to be a chill December day in 1862, just after the Battle of Fredericksburg. Corpses and broken furniture and shards of ceramic pots litter the streets.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 9, 2001
ROBERT Duvall sat in a chair on a Western Maryland farm. The day was overcast but warm, the ground on the farm slightly muddy from two days of rain. Duvall sported a white beard, white hair and the gray uniform of a Confederate general in the War Between the States. If he looked like Robert E. Lee, it's because he should have. Duvall is playing Lee in Ron Maxwell's production of Gods and Generals, a Civil War epic scheduled for release in late 2002. "I love it," Duvall said of playing Lee. "It's a great privilege.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 23, 2008
Starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, Robert Duvall / Directed by Francis Ford Coppola / Paramount / $69.99 (blu-ray, $124.99) dvds One of the greatest, most influential and most popular movies of all time, as well as its equally audacious sequel, get the red-carpet treatment, thanks to a couple years of hard work from film restoration expert Robert Harris. The result is stunning, with a depth of colors that hasn't been seen in more than 30 years. Fans of The Godfather and The Godfather: Part II will revel in the films' newfound glory.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 5, 1998
IF YOU ASKED me to name the three scariest threats facing the human race, I'd give the same answer that most people would: nuclear war, global warming and Windows. So I was happy to learn that the federal government has decided to protect me from Microsoft.Sometimes, when we face a huge threat, we need the government to protect us. This idea was dramatized in the recent movie "Deep Impact," which you might have missed because it was in theaters for only about 15 minutes before spontaneously mutating into rental videocassettes.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 5, 1998
IF YOU ASKED me to name the three scariest threats facing the human race, I'd give the same answer that most people would: nuclear war, global warming and Windows. So I was happy to learn that the federal government has decided to protect me from Microsoft.Sometimes, when we face a huge threat, we need the government to protect us. This idea was dramatized in the recent movie "Deep Impact," which you might have missed because it was in theaters for only about 15 minutes before spontaneously mutating into rental videocassettes.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 8, 1998
It's one of the crowning contradictions of the movie industry that it is willing -- in fact, eager -- to purvey all manner of sexual depravity, sadistic violence, vulgarity and moral corruption on the big screen without a sigh of remorse. But when it comes to showing mainstream religion, that same movie industry becomes as timid as a church mouse.It's as if Hollywood has somehow confused itself with the government, hewing carefully to a strict separation of church and state.Of course, movies are made about religion, but most of them have stayed within the confines of some well-known stereotypes.
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