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By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2000
In a dimly lighted room in the Oella Mill, 800 heads are waiting - all of them bald and staring into eternity. They sit on wooden racks, waiting for history to come alive. The synthetic heads await the artistry of Dorfman Museum Figures Inc. Using skills that have been honed over its 43-year history, the Howard County company has churned out thousands of figures - from the most recognizable presidents to the most nondescript workers. Run by Robert Dorfman, whose father, Earl, founded it, the business has become the place to go for people looking for realistic replicas.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith , tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 11, 1991
TWELFTH Night" is a Shakespearean comedy (with music) that lends itself to elaboration, and Center Stage is doing that, with excellent results.The comedy, if you are unfamiliar with it, is a tale of mistaken identities, one in which Viola, disguised as a boy, falls in love with Orsino, who loves Olivia, who loves Viola, not knowing the boy she loves is really a girl.Viola's twin brother, thought dead, reappears and is mistaken for Viola. Mix-up follows mix-up until all this business is settled at curtain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Robert Dorfman doesn't need a mirror to see that he's aging. All he has to do is look at the dapper fellow next to him.Mr. Dorfman is the heavier of the two. He has a ring on his right pinky. But those are the only noticeable differences.Both are balding. Their beards are gray. Their clothes are identical. But Mr. Dorfman still looks older.He is the 44-year-old head of a Baltimore company that makes lifelike human figures for museums. His counterpart is one of his plastic and polyurethane-foam creations.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2003
The outside of Robert Dorfman's business on Holabird Avenue in Baltimore is deceptively plain - no display window, no artistic sign to hint at the creativity within. Open the door, though, and you find an 82nd Airborne soldier, dressed in fatigues, crouched, squinting as he peers into the sight of his M-14. Nearby, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in a business suit, stands next to a gray-haired Benjamin Banneker in late 18th-century breeches and jacket. To their right sits Dorfman's father, Earl, head slightly down, eyes closed.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
Behind the big glass window, Nathaniel Parker Jr., 58, checked the fit of the navy-blue double-breasted suit on the headless figure that will soon portray J. C. Penney, founder of the department-store chain, as he appeared in the 1940s.In another room at the old Oella Mill, Robert Dorfman, 50, smoothed the straight, jet-black hair on the head of what will be a figure of a young Seminole Indian girl in a museum in the Florida Everglades. Nearby is a clay head of Union Gen. George G. Meade, surrounded by the pictures from which it was modeled.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith , tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 10, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Midway into registration for spring courses, students at the University of Maryland's largest campus are already finding some courses full or closed.A shortage of faculty members caused by budget cuts has shaved the number of seats available in required junior-year English courses by 1,500. At least 1,000 fewer seats are available for an advanced-studies course required for seniors.Anticipating problems, university administrators have put a clamp on course-shopping by students by limiting the number of credits a student can sign up for. They also have rationed seats so that space will be left for first- and second-year students.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2003
The outside of Robert Dorfman's business on Holabird Avenue in Baltimore is deceptively plain - no display window, no artistic sign to hint at the creativity within. Open the door, though, and you find an 82nd Airborne soldier, dressed in fatigues, crouched, squinting as he peers into the sight of his M-14. Nearby, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in a business suit, stands next to a gray-haired Benjamin Banneker in late 18th-century breeches and jacket. To their right sits Dorfman's father, Earl, head slightly down, eyes closed.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2000
In a dimly lighted room in the Oella Mill, 800 heads are waiting - all of them bald and staring into eternity. They sit on wooden racks, waiting for history to come alive. The synthetic heads await the artistry of Dorfman Museum Figures Inc. Using skills that have been honed over its 43-year history, the Howard County company has churned out thousands of figures - from the most recognizable presidents to the most nondescript workers. Run by Robert Dorfman, whose father, Earl, founded it, the business has become the place to go for people looking for realistic replicas.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
Behind the big glass window, Nathaniel Parker Jr., 58, checked the fit of the navy-blue double-breasted suit on the headless figure that will soon portray J. C. Penney, founder of the department-store chain, as he appeared in the 1940s.In another room at the old Oella Mill, Robert Dorfman, 50, smoothed the straight, jet-black hair on the head of what will be a figure of a young Seminole Indian girl in a museum in the Florida Everglades. Nearby is a clay head of Union Gen. George G. Meade, surrounded by the pictures from which it was modeled.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Robert Dorfman doesn't need a mirror to see that he's aging. All he has to do is look at the dapper fellow next to him.Mr. Dorfman is the heavier of the two. He has a ring on his right pinky. But those are the only noticeable differences.Both are balding. Their beards are gray. Their clothes are identical. But Mr. Dorfman still looks older.He is the 44-year-old head of a Baltimore company that makes lifelike human figures for museums. His counterpart is one of his plastic and polyurethane-foam creations.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 10, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Midway into registration for spring courses, students at the University of Maryland's largest campus are already finding some courses full or closed.A shortage of faculty members caused by budget cuts has shaved the number of seats available in required junior-year English courses by 1,500. At least 1,000 fewer seats are available for an advanced-studies course required for seniors.Anticipating problems, university administrators have put a clamp on course-shopping by students by limiting the number of credits a student can sign up for. They also have rationed seats so that space will be left for first- and second-year students.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 11, 1991
TWELFTH Night" is a Shakespearean comedy (with music) that lends itself to elaboration, and Center Stage is doing that, with excellent results.The comedy, if you are unfamiliar with it, is a tale of mistaken identities, one in which Viola, disguised as a boy, falls in love with Orsino, who loves Olivia, who loves Viola, not knowing the boy she loves is really a girl.Viola's twin brother, thought dead, reappears and is mistaken for Viola. Mix-up follows mix-up until all this business is settled at curtain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 17, 1998
Only four days remain to see Center Stage's production of Shakespeare's "As You Like It," with its strong performances by Diana LaMar and Stephen Barker Turner as the play's central lovers, Rosalind and Orlando, and a hilarious turn by Robert Dorfman as Touchstone, the court jester.Director Irene Lewis' production features a number of delightful, unconventional touches, such as the inclusion of an on-stage musician (Karen Hansen), who walks through the action playing instruments ranging from Renaissance strings to bowed saw and accordion.
NEWS
By Lou Ferrara and Lou Ferrara,Special to The Sun | December 6, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- University of Maryland officials announced plans yesterday to rescue two academic departments originally on a "hit list" to be abolished with nine others on the College Park campus.The College of Library and Information Services and the Department of Nuclear Engineering will be spared in the budget-cutting process that has forced layoffs and reductions in academic offerings here during the past year, Provost J. Robert Dorfman told the campus senate.Mr. Dorfman said the decision to preserve the two programs was sparked by recent developments off campus.
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