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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
As reported in the Baltimore Sun and elsewhere, Robert De Niro had lunch on Saturday at Chazz: A Bronx Original, the Harbor East restaurant opened this summer by his friend, the actor Chazz Palminteri. De Niro was traveling on Saturday from Philadelphia, where he's filming a movie, to Washington, D.C., for the annual Kennedy Center Honors. I was at the restaurant when De Niro visited, with a dog's-eye view of the excitement. Actually it was less exciting than sweet. Palminteri and his Baltimore partners, the Vitale family, were obviously delighted that De Niro, a noted restaurateur in his own right, was coming for a visit.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
As reported in the Baltimore Sun and elsewhere, Robert De Niro had lunch on Saturday at Chazz: A Bronx Original, the Harbor East restaurant opened this summer by his friend, the actor Chazz Palminteri. De Niro was traveling on Saturday from Philadelphia, where he's filming a movie, to Washington, D.C., for the annual Kennedy Center Honors. I was at the restaurant when De Niro visited, with a dog's-eye view of the excitement. Actually it was less exciting than sweet. Palminteri and his Baltimore partners, the Vitale family, were obviously delighted that De Niro, a noted restaurateur in his own right, was coming for a visit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
Academy Award-winning actor Robert De Niro lunched at a Harbor East restaurant Saturday. De Niro had an early afternoon meal with actor and restaurateur Chazz Palminteri at his six-month old establishment Chazz: A Bronx Original in the 1400 block of Aliceanna St., according to restaurant spokeswoman Marianne Ortiz. De Niro was accompanied by several other guests, she said. He was on his way to Washington for the Kennedy Center Honors, scheduled for Sunday. Also present for the meal were Sergio and Alessandro Vitale, who run the business with Palminteri.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
Academy Award-winning actor Robert De Niro lunched at a Harbor East restaurant Saturday. De Niro had an early afternoon meal with actor and restaurateur Chazz Palminteri at his six-month old establishment Chazz: A Bronx Original in the 1400 block of Aliceanna St., according to restaurant spokeswoman Marianne Ortiz. De Niro was accompanied by several other guests, she said. He was on his way to Washington for the Kennedy Center Honors, scheduled for Sunday. Also present for the meal were Sergio and Alessandro Vitale, who run the business with Palminteri.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | August 19, 2007
He now lives in Connecticut with his wife, Diana, but writer-director-producer Barry Levinson is Baltimore's native son and, in the 25 years since Diner, he's been one of Hollywood's finest. That's why insiders and movie-lovers alike are gleefully anticipating his new independent comedy-drama, What Just Happened?, a "sometimes painfully funny" movie about a Hollywood filmmaker juggling ex-wives and volatile projects. The film features his Wag the Dog star Robert De Niro in the lead role.
FEATURES
August 17, 2007
87 Maureen O'Hara Actress 64 Robert De Niro Actor 49 Belinda Carlisle Singer 47 Sean Penn Actor 38 Donnie Wahlberg Actor/singer
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 14, 1991
* ''Cape Fear'' An ex-convict terrorizes his former lawyer and his family. Robert De Niro, Nick Nolte and Jessica Lange star, and Martin Scorsese directed.
NEWS
June 3, 2007
Mark Harris, 84 Novelist Mark Harris, best known for baseball novels that included Bang the Drum Slowly, died Wednesday at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, Calif. Mr. Harris had contracted pneumonia after breaking his hip in a fall a month ago, said his wife, Josephine Harris. Mr. Harris wrote five nonfiction books and 13 novels, including the baseball books The Southpaw (1953), Bang the Drum Slowly (1956), A Ticket for a Seamstitch (1957) and It Looked Like Forever (1979). Bang the Drum Slowly, which he also adapted for the 1973 movie starring Michael Moriarty and Robert De Niro, was the most popular of the four and it was named one of the top 100 sports books of all time by Sports Illustrated.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 28, 2005
I won't say which Stephen King novel and movie Hide and Seek rips off - that would give too much away. And really, the scares are already rare enough in this ho-hum, little-girl-and-her-ghost thriller. No sense ruining any of them with a silly old movie review. Robert De Niro plays a New York psychologist whose daughter (Dakota Fanning) turns into a Wednesday Addams clone when they find mommy's body in a tub of blood. He then decides they should move to the country. There, Emily meets Charlie, an imaginary friend who likes to play her favorite game, hide and seek.
FEATURES
May 3, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Maybe nice guys finish last, but Mean Girls came in first at the weekend box office. The comedy starring Lindsay Lohan as a student who gets swept up in the backstabbing politics of fashion, love and popularity among high school cliques, earned $25 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. Although it starred 17-year-old Lohan, the presence of Saturday Night Live star Tina Fey, who also wrote the screenplay, appealed to grown-up moviegoers. About 75 percent of the audience was female and about half the audience was under 18, said Wayne Lewellen, head of distribution for Paramount, which released the movie.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | August 19, 2007
He now lives in Connecticut with his wife, Diana, but writer-director-producer Barry Levinson is Baltimore's native son and, in the 25 years since Diner, he's been one of Hollywood's finest. That's why insiders and movie-lovers alike are gleefully anticipating his new independent comedy-drama, What Just Happened?, a "sometimes painfully funny" movie about a Hollywood filmmaker juggling ex-wives and volatile projects. The film features his Wag the Dog star Robert De Niro in the lead role.
FEATURES
August 17, 2007
87 Maureen O'Hara Actress 64 Robert De Niro Actor 49 Belinda Carlisle Singer 47 Sean Penn Actor 38 Donnie Wahlberg Actor/singer
NEWS
June 3, 2007
Mark Harris, 84 Novelist Mark Harris, best known for baseball novels that included Bang the Drum Slowly, died Wednesday at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, Calif. Mr. Harris had contracted pneumonia after breaking his hip in a fall a month ago, said his wife, Josephine Harris. Mr. Harris wrote five nonfiction books and 13 novels, including the baseball books The Southpaw (1953), Bang the Drum Slowly (1956), A Ticket for a Seamstitch (1957) and It Looked Like Forever (1979). Bang the Drum Slowly, which he also adapted for the 1973 movie starring Michael Moriarty and Robert De Niro, was the most popular of the four and it was named one of the top 100 sports books of all time by Sports Illustrated.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 28, 2005
I won't say which Stephen King novel and movie Hide and Seek rips off - that would give too much away. And really, the scares are already rare enough in this ho-hum, little-girl-and-her-ghost thriller. No sense ruining any of them with a silly old movie review. Robert De Niro plays a New York psychologist whose daughter (Dakota Fanning) turns into a Wednesday Addams clone when they find mommy's body in a tub of blood. He then decides they should move to the country. There, Emily meets Charlie, an imaginary friend who likes to play her favorite game, hide and seek.
FEATURES
May 3, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Maybe nice guys finish last, but Mean Girls came in first at the weekend box office. The comedy starring Lindsay Lohan as a student who gets swept up in the backstabbing politics of fashion, love and popularity among high school cliques, earned $25 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. Although it starred 17-year-old Lohan, the presence of Saturday Night Live star Tina Fey, who also wrote the screenplay, appealed to grown-up moviegoers. About 75 percent of the audience was female and about half the audience was under 18, said Wayne Lewellen, head of distribution for Paramount, which released the movie.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 6, 2000
Just when you thought Hollywood had forgotten how to make a comedy that didn't depend on the body's nether regions for humor, along comes the unlikely duo of Ben Stiller and Robert De Niro to blow that notion right out of the water. "Meet the Parents" is the funniest film in years, a wonderfully organic comedy that builds on De Niro's surprising second career as a comic actor (coming on the heels of 1999's "Analyze This"). It's also a film that should ring familiar to anyone who's ever endured the anxiety of meeting a prospective spouse's parents - and then spent days replaying every word and action, trying to figure how you made such a bad impression.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach and Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
After a disappointing summer where the only real standouts were "The Perfect Storm," which made a star of the weather, and Clint Eastwood's "Space Cowboys," about four geriatric astronauts, movie audiences are left with only one hope: That Hollywood was holding back its best stuff for after Labor Day. At least in recent years, that's been the pattern, as major studios wait until the last three months of the year to release any film with a remote chance...
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 1995
Martin Scorsese's new and sensational "Casino" comes from a script written by the director and screenwriter-author-journalist Nicholas Pileggi, but it's hard to believe another name doesn't belong somewhere in the credits: John Milton.Yes, that John Milton, the original Uncle Miltie of English lit. For "Casino" is really "Paradise Lost" Vegas-style, a study of monumental and character-driven folly. Its majestic chronicle tracks two men who inherited the Garden of Eden and managed in a very short time to destroy everything for no more cogent reason than their own bitter and unmalleable pride, which goeth before the fall every darn time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach and Rasmi Simhan and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
After a disappointing summer where the only real standouts were "The Perfect Storm," which made a star of the weather, and Clint Eastwood's "Space Cowboys," about four geriatric astronauts, movie audiences are left with only one hope: That Hollywood was holding back its best stuff for after Labor Day. At least in recent years, that's been the pattern, as major studios wait until the last three months of the year to release any film with a remote chance...
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
"Analyze This," the new movie from comedy expert Harold Ramis ("Groundhog Day," "Ghostbusters"), would be worth celebrating if only for its centerpiece, Robert De Niro doing a hilariously dead-on impersonation of himself.But a gem like De Niro's performance can only be set off by the proper setting, which makes "Analyze This" such a rare find: a well-conceptualized comedy that actually achieves what it sets out to do, in about 100 minutes.No bells, no whistles, no errant bodily fluids making their way to the leading lady's hair, "Analyze This" gets its laughs the honest way: with a generous amount of mugging, several inside movie jokes, some giddy sight gags and lots of undemanding humor along the way.Mostly, though, the laughs in "Analyze This" are for De Niro, who plays a gangster named Paul Vitti.
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