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By Mark A. Graber | December 24, 2012
Robert Bork, who died Wednesday, occupies a peculiar position in the pantheon of American conservative heroes. Most conservatives celebrated Judge Bork as the champion of constitutional values who was denied his rightful position on the Supreme Court by liberals bent on warping constitutional language for partisan purposes. Constitutional conservatives for the past 25 years, however, have gone on precisely the sort of judicial crusade that Judge Bork condemned in his major writings. While Judge Bork and such contemporary justices as Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas share a superficial commitment to constitutional originalism, the originalism of the conservatives on the present Supreme Court bears little relationship to the originalism Mr. Bork pioneered during the 1970s and 1980s.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 10, 2014
Let's say you are an intelligent, successful federal prosecutor from an elite law school and possessing all of the important political contacts in Washington, D.C. An election occurs. Your party wins, and the president-elect begins to put together a cabinet. One day you receive a call from the transition team. Senior aides want to know if you are interested in becoming the next U.S. attorney general. You take it, right? Wrong. You tell the president-elect's people that they have the wrong number.
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NEWS
June 28, 2010
Solicitor General Elena Kagan's ascendency to the Supreme Court should be emphatically rejected. Ms. Kagan has not yet had time to develop a mature philosophy of judging. Her vision of judicial power and its role is reflected in her adulation of former Israeli Chief Justice Aharon Barak, whom Ms. Kagan once called her "judicial hero." Former U.S. Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork, however, called Judge Barak "one of the most activist judges" and quite possibly "the worst judge on the planet."
NEWS
By Mark A. Graber | December 24, 2012
Robert Bork, who died Wednesday, occupies a peculiar position in the pantheon of American conservative heroes. Most conservatives celebrated Judge Bork as the champion of constitutional values who was denied his rightful position on the Supreme Court by liberals bent on warping constitutional language for partisan purposes. Constitutional conservatives for the past 25 years, however, have gone on precisely the sort of judicial crusade that Judge Bork condemned in his major writings. While Judge Bork and such contemporary justices as Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas share a superficial commitment to constitutional originalism, the originalism of the conservatives on the present Supreme Court bears little relationship to the originalism Mr. Bork pioneered during the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | August 16, 1995
SO MUCH for Rupert Murdoch's loyalty to Newt Gingrich.When Gail Sheehy's profile of the Speaker surfaced in Vanity Fair last week, no one in American journalism did more to promote it than Murdoch -- devoting the front page of the New York Post, where he holds the title editor-in-chief, to the headline "Who's a Newty Boy?" along with the teaser "Aide: He made whoopee on an office desk." And Murdoch did this even as Gingrich was touring the country hawking "To Renew America" for his own (as well as Newty Boy's)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 29, 1993
THE PERFECT Clinton choice for the Supreme Court is someone who can be confirmed quickly and without any fuss.Why? Because conservatives and Republicans, still simmering over how Democrats worked over nominees Robert Bork (who was defeated) and Clarence Thomas (who won Senate approval narrowly). They're spoiling for a fight.The right wing Free Congress Foundation, with the apparent approval of Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole and Judiciary Committee ranking Republican, Orrin Hatch, has established a monitoring group to do "opposition research" (look for dirt)
NEWS
September 14, 1990
Based on David H. Souter's testimony in his initial appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday, we believe that Judge Souter should be -- and will be -- confirmed as the 105th justice of the United States Supreme Court.Clearly this man is no Robert Bork -- the haughty ideologue so eager to become the judicial high priest who would give absolution to the social Darwinism that his patron Ronald Reagan pursued. Nor does Souter see the Supreme Court -- as Bork did -- as "an intellectual feast," as if judging were a parlor game to be played by professorial elites.
NEWS
By Jack Fruchtman Jr. and Jack Fruchtman Jr.,Jack Fruchtman Jr. teaches politics and directs the prelaw program at Towson State University. Lyle Denniston's column, "Law in Perspective," which usually appears in this space, will resume next week | September 30, 1990
Political commentators have observed how different Supreme Court nominee David H. Souter is from Robert Bork. That comparison is not apt because Mr. Bork, whose own nomination to the high court failed just three years ago, possesses a constitutional theory so radical and idiosyncratic that it is unlike that of any other modern jurist. His reading of the Constitution is so literal, so rigidly founded in original intent, and so oriented toward government power over the individual that we must find another basis of comparison to gauge Judge Souter's philosophy.
NEWS
By Andrew Bernstein | November 8, 1998
AS ANALYSTS debate whether the elections resulted in a net benefit for the Republicans or the Democrats, there is a better question to ask: Does it really matter? The debate over the elections assumes there is still some substantive distinction between the two parties. But is there?A recent New York Times article on the Senate race in that state observed that the two candidates - Republican Alfonse D'Amato and Democrat Charles Schumer - are not nearly so opposed on political ideology as is generally thought.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 10, 2014
Let's say you are an intelligent, successful federal prosecutor from an elite law school and possessing all of the important political contacts in Washington, D.C. An election occurs. Your party wins, and the president-elect begins to put together a cabinet. One day you receive a call from the transition team. Senior aides want to know if you are interested in becoming the next U.S. attorney general. You take it, right? Wrong. You tell the president-elect's people that they have the wrong number.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Solicitor General Elena Kagan's ascendency to the Supreme Court should be emphatically rejected. Ms. Kagan has not yet had time to develop a mature philosophy of judging. Her vision of judicial power and its role is reflected in her adulation of former Israeli Chief Justice Aharon Barak, whom Ms. Kagan once called her "judicial hero." Former U.S. Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork, however, called Judge Barak "one of the most activist judges" and quite possibly "the worst judge on the planet."
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sen. Arlen Specter is, by any definition, a survivor. Brain tumors. Heart surgery. Primaries and general elections, sometimes when the pundits predicted defeat. And now, Hodgkin's disease, on the eve of the moment he's waited for all his political life - a chance to gavel the Senate Judiciary Committee to order as it considers the nominee to be the next Supreme Court justice. Specter's head is nearly bald these days. He keeps a tissue close at hand, to dab at his watery eyes and runny nose.
NEWS
By Andrew Bernstein | November 8, 1998
AS ANALYSTS debate whether the elections resulted in a net benefit for the Republicans or the Democrats, there is a better question to ask: Does it really matter? The debate over the elections assumes there is still some substantive distinction between the two parties. But is there?A recent New York Times article on the Senate race in that state observed that the two candidates - Republican Alfonse D'Amato and Democrat Charles Schumer - are not nearly so opposed on political ideology as is generally thought.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | August 16, 1995
SO MUCH for Rupert Murdoch's loyalty to Newt Gingrich.When Gail Sheehy's profile of the Speaker surfaced in Vanity Fair last week, no one in American journalism did more to promote it than Murdoch -- devoting the front page of the New York Post, where he holds the title editor-in-chief, to the headline "Who's a Newty Boy?" along with the teaser "Aide: He made whoopee on an office desk." And Murdoch did this even as Gingrich was touring the country hawking "To Renew America" for his own (as well as Newty Boy's)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 29, 1993
THE PERFECT Clinton choice for the Supreme Court is someone who can be confirmed quickly and without any fuss.Why? Because conservatives and Republicans, still simmering over how Democrats worked over nominees Robert Bork (who was defeated) and Clarence Thomas (who won Senate approval narrowly). They're spoiling for a fight.The right wing Free Congress Foundation, with the apparent approval of Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole and Judiciary Committee ranking Republican, Orrin Hatch, has established a monitoring group to do "opposition research" (look for dirt)
NEWS
By Jack Fruchtman Jr. and Jack Fruchtman Jr.,Jack Fruchtman Jr. teaches politics and directs the prelaw program at Towson State University. Lyle Denniston's column, "Law in Perspective," which usually appears in this space, will resume next week | September 30, 1990
Political commentators have observed how different Supreme Court nominee David H. Souter is from Robert Bork. That comparison is not apt because Mr. Bork, whose own nomination to the high court failed just three years ago, possesses a constitutional theory so radical and idiosyncratic that it is unlike that of any other modern jurist. His reading of the Constitution is so literal, so rigidly founded in original intent, and so oriented toward government power over the individual that we must find another basis of comparison to gauge Judge Souter's philosophy.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sen. Arlen Specter is, by any definition, a survivor. Brain tumors. Heart surgery. Primaries and general elections, sometimes when the pundits predicted defeat. And now, Hodgkin's disease, on the eve of the moment he's waited for all his political life - a chance to gavel the Senate Judiciary Committee to order as it considers the nominee to be the next Supreme Court justice. Specter's head is nearly bald these days. He keeps a tissue close at hand, to dab at his watery eyes and runny nose.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,From The Evening Sun | September 15, 1990
BASED ON two days of impressive testimony Thursday and Friday before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Judge David H. Souter seems to have pretty conclusively established that he should be -- and will be -- confirmed as the 105th justice of the United States Supreme Court.He established, especially, that he is no Robert Bork -- the haughty ideologue who seemed so eager to become the nation's judicial high priest who would give absolution to the sins of social Darwinism that his patron Ronald Reagan committed for eight years.
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