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TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | March 29, 2009
Jazz stars from around the world, including Dianne Reeves and Kyle Eastwood, son of Clint, will gather this week for the 10th annual Cape Town International Jazz Festival. The event, Friday and Saturday, will feature musicians on five stages as well as workshops and classes for budding artists. You can see the list of activities at www.capetownjazzfest.com. Here are five other things to do: 1 Hike Table Mountain : If you're feeling energetic, hike to the top of this plateau that rises 3,566 feet above sea level.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 8, 2013
Many who spent decades in journalism as I did hesitate or hedge when asked to name the most important/interesting/influential/fascinating person they ever met. But I don't. Sorting through the politicians and pundits, the athletes and actors, the common folk and the highfalutin', one name clearly stands out: Nelson Mandela. Today I do not really mourn his death, I celebrate his life. They do not come much better. I was so fortunate to be the South Africa bureau chief for The Sun - reaching Johannesburg on April 27, 1993 - one year to the day before the election that made Mandela president.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 12, 1994
ROBBEN ISLAND, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela visited the 7-foot-by-9-foot room that was his home here for almost 20 years, celebrating yesterday the fourth anniversary of his release from prison, which marked the turning point against apartheid.As he looked around the bare walls of his cell, crowded with its sparse furnishings of a bed, table and chair, he told reporters that it looked exactly as it did when he did his time there."I never believed in decorating prison cells," he said after a boat trip to the island, about seven miles off Cape Town.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | March 29, 2009
Jazz stars from around the world, including Dianne Reeves and Kyle Eastwood, son of Clint, will gather this week for the 10th annual Cape Town International Jazz Festival. The event, Friday and Saturday, will feature musicians on five stages as well as workshops and classes for budding artists. You can see the list of activities at www.capetownjazzfest.com. Here are five other things to do: 1 Hike Table Mountain : If you're feeling energetic, hike to the top of this plateau that rises 3,566 feet above sea level.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judy van der Walt and Judy van der Walt,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
CAPE TOWN, S. Africa -- It is a rainy Tuesday morning in Cape Town, and the Baxter Theatre is cold and cavernous. A man mops away the previous night's debris, and the floor shines damply. In a windowless room, stark in its flat neon lighting, old theater posters jostle each other on a wall. Cups are set out on a table, and the kettle is on. Enter Athol Fugard, once proclaimed the greatest active English-language playwright by Time magazine. Just as the sun never set on the old British empire, it might never set on Fugard's work; it's seemingly possible to see him on stage somewhere on any given day. His 1973 play, The Island, is enjoying a revival, having completed a stay at the Kennedy Center in December, and running now through mid-April in London's West End. And his newest play, Sorrow & Rejoicings, currently is in previews in New York starring John Glover, Judith Light and Charlayne Woodard.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - When Peter-Paul Ngwenya, executive chairman of Makana Investment Corp. decided to buy a new car last month, he paid cash for a BMW 5-Series and had the dealer deliver the gleaming automobile to the front door of his spacious home nestled in the formerly all-white Johannesburg suburb of Fourways. When he was handed the keys, Ngwenya says, he had to pinch himself to believe how his fortunes had changed. Born in a black township during the most oppressive days of apartheid, he grew up smuggling grenades, AK-47s and bombs for the struggle against white rule before getting caught and banished to Robben Island prison, where he dreamt of political freedom, not the economic success he enjoys today.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | December 15, 1997
CAUGHT up in the anti-apartheid movement in the 1980s, I, too, sang:Bring back Nelson Mandela.Bring him back home to Soweto.I want to see him walking hand in handWith Winnie Mandela -- tomorrow!And when that scene actually took place on Feb. 11, 1990, few were happier than I that, as Mr. Mandela took his long walk to freedom, Winnie was there by his side, beaming, triumphant.Role modelsTo American blacks in need of superheroes, Nelson and Winnie were perfect -- so perfect that America's favorite dad, Bill Cosby, had the grandchildren on his television sitcom named Nelson and Winnie.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 1, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africans may have long forgotten the passionate anti-apartheid speeches they heard during their struggle against white minority rule. But few forget the music. More than any speech, the songs and chants of protest united and inspired generations of South Africans to join the fight for political freedom. Now music may help save South Africa once again. To mark World AIDS Day, which is today, a long list of musicians -- including U2's Bono, Peter Gabriel, Beyonce Knowles, The Eurythmics, Queen, and even reclusive folk singer Yusuf Islam (better known as Cat Stevens)
NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 8, 2013
Many who spent decades in journalism as I did hesitate or hedge when asked to name the most important/interesting/influential/fascinating person they ever met. But I don't. Sorting through the politicians and pundits, the athletes and actors, the common folk and the highfalutin', one name clearly stands out: Nelson Mandela. Today I do not really mourn his death, I celebrate his life. They do not come much better. I was so fortunate to be the South Africa bureau chief for The Sun - reaching Johannesburg on April 27, 1993 - one year to the day before the election that made Mandela president.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
DENNIS BRUTUS, 85 Poet, anti-apartheid activist South African poet and former political prisoner Dennis Brutus died in his sleep at his home in Cape Town on Saturday. Mr. Brutus was an anti-apartheid activist who was jailed at Robben Island with Nelson Mandela in the mid-1960s. His activism led Olympic officials to ban South Africa from competition from 1964 until apartheid ended nearly 30 years later. Exiled from South Africa in 1966, Mr. Brutus later moved to the United States and taught literature and African studies at Northwestern University and the University of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - When Peter-Paul Ngwenya, executive chairman of Makana Investment Corp. decided to buy a new car last month, he paid cash for a BMW 5-Series and had the dealer deliver the gleaming automobile to the front door of his spacious home nestled in the formerly all-white Johannesburg suburb of Fourways. When he was handed the keys, Ngwenya says, he had to pinch himself to believe how his fortunes had changed. Born in a black township during the most oppressive days of apartheid, he grew up smuggling grenades, AK-47s and bombs for the struggle against white rule before getting caught and banished to Robben Island prison, where he dreamt of political freedom, not the economic success he enjoys today.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 1, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africans may have long forgotten the passionate anti-apartheid speeches they heard during their struggle against white minority rule. But few forget the music. More than any speech, the songs and chants of protest united and inspired generations of South Africans to join the fight for political freedom. Now music may help save South Africa once again. To mark World AIDS Day, which is today, a long list of musicians -- including U2's Bono, Peter Gabriel, Beyonce Knowles, The Eurythmics, Queen, and even reclusive folk singer Yusuf Islam (better known as Cat Stevens)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judy van der Walt and Judy van der Walt,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
CAPE TOWN, S. Africa -- It is a rainy Tuesday morning in Cape Town, and the Baxter Theatre is cold and cavernous. A man mops away the previous night's debris, and the floor shines damply. In a windowless room, stark in its flat neon lighting, old theater posters jostle each other on a wall. Cups are set out on a table, and the kettle is on. Enter Athol Fugard, once proclaimed the greatest active English-language playwright by Time magazine. Just as the sun never set on the old British empire, it might never set on Fugard's work; it's seemingly possible to see him on stage somewhere on any given day. His 1973 play, The Island, is enjoying a revival, having completed a stay at the Kennedy Center in December, and running now through mid-April in London's West End. And his newest play, Sorrow & Rejoicings, currently is in previews in New York starring John Glover, Judith Light and Charlayne Woodard.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | December 15, 1997
CAUGHT up in the anti-apartheid movement in the 1980s, I, too, sang:Bring back Nelson Mandela.Bring him back home to Soweto.I want to see him walking hand in handWith Winnie Mandela -- tomorrow!And when that scene actually took place on Feb. 11, 1990, few were happier than I that, as Mr. Mandela took his long walk to freedom, Winnie was there by his side, beaming, triumphant.Role modelsTo American blacks in need of superheroes, Nelson and Winnie were perfect -- so perfect that America's favorite dad, Bill Cosby, had the grandchildren on his television sitcom named Nelson and Winnie.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 12, 1994
ROBBEN ISLAND, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela visited the 7-foot-by-9-foot room that was his home here for almost 20 years, celebrating yesterday the fourth anniversary of his release from prison, which marked the turning point against apartheid.As he looked around the bare walls of his cell, crowded with its sparse furnishings of a bed, table and chair, he told reporters that it looked exactly as it did when he did his time there."I never believed in decorating prison cells," he said after a boat trip to the island, about seven miles off Cape Town.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
DENNIS BRUTUS, 85 Poet, anti-apartheid activist South African poet and former political prisoner Dennis Brutus died in his sleep at his home in Cape Town on Saturday. Mr. Brutus was an anti-apartheid activist who was jailed at Robben Island with Nelson Mandela in the mid-1960s. His activism led Olympic officials to ban South Africa from competition from 1964 until apartheid ended nearly 30 years later. Exiled from South Africa in 1966, Mr. Brutus later moved to the United States and taught literature and African studies at Northwestern University and the University of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
November 1, 1993
Dr. Neville Alexander, distinguished South African author, educator and anti-apartheid activist, will speak at Western Maryland College Friday on that nation's shifting political fortunes.His talk, "Transition in South Africa: From Apartheid to Democracy?", will take place at 11:45 a.m. in McDaniel Lounge. The free lecture is sponsored by the college's Department of Sociology.Dr. Alexander, a noted figure in the anti-apartheid movement for more than three decades, was imprisoned for 11 years at Robben Island with Nelson Mandela.
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