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By ELIZABETH LARGE | November 19, 2008
Obviously, anything could be an alternative to a traditional roast turkey for Thanksgiving. But I wanted to pick foods I know would work (because of their association with Native Americans, for instance) or that I've served or had served to me: 1 Wild duck with sauerkraut (particularly appropriate because Baltimoreans eat sauerkraut with Thanksgiving dinner anyway, which I've never understood) 2 Goose with fruit stuffing. Unfortunately the one time I cooked a wild goose, it also contained buckshot.
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NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 12, 2008
Autumn is my favorite time of year. I love the changing leaves, the cool temperatures, decorating with pumpkins and having a wide variety of vegetables in season. Root vegetables like squash, rutabagas, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are all at their peak now. They not only are plentiful, but are powerhouses of nutrients. Take beets, for instance. They are loaded with iron, potassium, calcium and zinc. I know beets don't make it on most lists of favorite foods, but I grew up eating them.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | May 30, 2008
Muggsy Bogues has a score to settle with Bob Wade. It seems that at a celebrity roast for Bogues, Wade, his former coach at Dunbar, told a story about not being able to find his point guard before a Beltway Classic game against perennial power DeMatha. Wade, who will be honored tonight at a roast at Martin's West in Woodlawn by his former players and colleagues, said Bogues missed a bus that was to take the Poets to the Towson Center from the East Baltimore school. This occurred despite Wade's admonition that anyone not present when the bus was to leave would be left, regardless of their status on the team.
NEWS
By Denise Martin and Donna Deane and Denise Martin and Donna Deane,Los Angeles Times | April 16, 2008
On a recent episode of Charlie Rose, chef Thomas Keller waxed poetic about roasted chicken. It has "reference points," he said. A big browned bird signals the arrival of the holidays, or a relaxed supper after a lazy Sunday. A whole roasted chicken, crisp-skinned and juicy and aromatic, resonates with deliciousness. But even when deconstructed to its humble parts, they too can hit all the same notes. Achieve them with a pan or in the oven, with a few easy techniques - the right ones for the right cut. Chicken breasts are succulent and tender when pounded thin and quickly sauteed until golden brown, then finished in a rustic Basque-style sauce.
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | April 6, 2008
No one could roast a chicken like my mother. No one. It was beautifully browned on the outside, moist on the inside, and had just the right amount of seasonings. Ask for her recipe? "Oh, Sandra, I don't know ... I just use a little onion and garlic powder, pepper and salt ... poultry needs lots of salt. Then just put it in the oven," she would say, her voice rising at the end, as if to say, `Come on, it's so simple, there's nothing to it!' " But there was a lot more to it, I would learn over the years.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 13, 2008
FOR MANY BALTIMOREANS, THE NEW year doesn't really start until the first Saturday in January. That's when the Rotary Club of Baltimore throws its annual Oyster Roast -- this year, its 84th. Folks line up outside the Fifth Regiment Armory long before the doors officially open at noon. Once those doors open, and the 2,000-plus guests come pouring in, the lines inside begin. Many are at the 12 oyster-shucking stations. Unless you're like Rick Hornig, Electric Motor Repair industrial salesman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | January 10, 2008
Oh, Mamie's, you had us at hello. From the moment we walked in, we fell in love with the 1940s Baltimore elementary school pictures on the walls, the wedding certificates, the baptism announcements, all proudly advertising your deep Baltimore roots. We adore your home-style menu of roast chicken, pot roast, meatloaf and pork chops. We can even forgive your new surroundings, in an impersonal Aberdeen shopping center. We know that you can take Mamie's out of Hampden, but you can't take the essential Hampden-ness out of Mamie's.
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | January 9, 2008
Except when it comes to caviar, effortless extravagance sounds like a contradiction in terms. But there is no better description of a seafood pan roast. This is the most luxurious indulgence: oysters or other shellfish awash in cream or pan sauce enhanced with only the subtlest seasonings so that the essential brininess shines through. In the most classic version, a slice of toasted bread is included to soak up all that great flavor and richness. To make this exercise in excess at its simplest, you heat cream with seasonings, warm shellfish in butter and combine the two. If you want to take a more restrained route, you can substitute dry vermouth or white wine for the cream.
NEWS
By Joyce White and Joyce White,Tribune Media Services | January 2, 2008
A rack of bronzed chickens revolving in a head-high rotisserie near the entrance door to the shop on rue de Bretagne in the Marais section of Paris halted my steps. It was late morning on a Sunday and I had just arrived in the City of Light, hungry and a little excited. In moments, the inviting aroma set in, and I looked up and saw the sign on the front of the shop, which read: "Jean Marc Stevenot: Maitre Volailler," or certified poultry expert. I took my place in the queue outside, brushing shoulders with chic Parisians carrying the makings of Sunday dinner at home: baguettes of breads, aromatic cheese, fragrant tarts and cakes, a bottle or two of wine in hand.
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