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By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
If you've ever wondered why it is better to sear than to boil your steak or how to properly roast a luscious hunk of beef, then Alton Brown's new I'm Just Here for the Food is the book for you. It is less a book of recipes, although there are 80 of them, than a primer on the mechanics of cooking. But if the word primer makes you sigh at the thought of textbooks and science talk, think again. Brown, the host of the Food Network's Good Eats, is an amiable, amusing and sometimes irreverent guide to the subject of applying heat to food and coming up with dinner for your efforts.
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FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | November 6, 1991
Michele Uravter, author of the "Monday to Friday Cookbook," says many of us may be dysfunctional cooks. "People have taken cooking class after cooking class and they still don't know how to cook," she says. She says she hopes her book will help them change by giving them what she calls the "power to cook" without being a slave to rigid rules. She sees the following recipe as a good example of how to transform a simple pasta into a one-pot meal by cooking the ingredients in sequence and saving time on cleanup.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 22, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Make family day an occasion with Georgia Peach-Glazed Pork Roast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
Sandra Lawler was all grown up and had left her Boston home before she realized that not everybody serves lamb on Easter. "I moved to Chicago, and they were serving ham, and I said, 'What is this? Who eats ham for Easter?'" The chef at Baltimore's Feast @ 4 East on Madison Street is expecting 50 family and friends for Easter dinner this Sunday, and she will be serving lamb, of course. But it is on the menu at her restaurant almost every night, too. Braised lamb shanks. Stuffed boneless lamb roast.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 3, 2000
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Treat the family to this juicy, cut-with-a-fork Sweet and Savory Pot Roast today.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 8, 2004
It's become routine for me to respond to casual dinner invitations from good friends by offering to bring a homemade dish to the meal. I am not the only one. Lately I've noticed that more and more guests seem to arrive at informal gatherings with a contribution. It seems to be a trend -- one with a logical explanation. Most of our friends lead hectic lives trying to balance demanding jobs, children's schedules and community commitments with entertaining. Finding time to plan and cook an entire meal can seem like a Herculean task, but when others volunteer to bring part of the night's fare -- a salad, a side dish or a dessert, for example -- then the stress factor is reduced and playing host for a supper or dinner seems much more manageable.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 27, 1996
It's not as easy to run the restaurant of an apartment house as you might think, even though you have a large number of potential customers in the building. When the maitre d' of the Ambassador dining room says the apartment house has lost four tenants in the past week, he's not saying they moved out.Many of the tenants are quite elderly. To complicate things, many of those who aren't elderly are Hopkins students. How do you appeal to two such distinctly different groups? Well, maybe you can't.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
The roast in the R.B.'s Beef & Cheddar ($7) is stacked so high that, with the curved roll, the sandwich is nearly round — and not much smaller than a softball. Maybe the best way to tackle this sandwich at Banksy's in the Lake Falls Village shopping center is to open it up and fork out some of the beef. Not only does this make it easier to eat, but you enjoy the treat of an exceptional roast. It needs no other adornment. Sliced thin and layered fold after fold, the Beef & Cheddar's meat combines quality and quantity.
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