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August 21, 2005
On August 20, 2005, ROALD; beloved husband of the late Barbara (nee Gibson); devoted step-father of Carla Hildebrandt, Ruth Nance, William Carney and Everette Carney; loving brother of Finn Bliksvaer. Also survived by five grandchildren. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Tuesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9. Funeral service will be held Tuesday, evening at 8 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society.
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FEATURES
December 14, 2005
Almanac-- Dec. 14--1911: Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole, beating out Robert F. Scott. 1985: Wilma Mankiller became the first woman to lead a major American Indian tribe as she took office as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.
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FEATURES
By Abby Karp | November 26, 1990
You learn the most surprising things from obituaries sometimes, and when I read the one about Roald Dahl, the celebrated children's author who died Friday at the age of 74, my mouth dropped open.Who would believe this man -- whose books describe so scathingly the warts and foibles and inexplicable cruelty of adults -- also had written the screenplay for the cheerful, optimistic, downright uplifting movie "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang?"The Roald Dahl I knew didn't have Dick Van Dyke in his vocabulary.
NEWS
August 21, 2005
On August 20, 2005, ROALD; beloved husband of the late Barbara (nee Gibson); devoted step-father of Carla Hildebrandt, Ruth Nance, William Carney and Everette Carney; loving brother of Finn Bliksvaer. Also survived by five grandchildren. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Tuesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9. Funeral service will be held Tuesday, evening at 8 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society.
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder | November 27, 1990
Before the first crisp chapter of "Matilda" is done with, Roald Dahl, who died Friday from an undisclosed infection at age 74, has skewered doting parents and parents who are just the opposite. Of the former, Dahl sneers, "It's a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful."And then there are those -- even worse, he says -- who treat their children like scabs: "A scab is something you have to put up with until the time comes when you can pick if off and flick it away."
FEATURES
December 14, 2005
Almanac-- Dec. 14--1911: Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole, beating out Robert F. Scott. 1985: Wilma Mankiller became the first woman to lead a major American Indian tribe as she took office as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.
FEATURES
February 23, 2000
"I would recommend 'Arthur's Halloween' by Marc Tolon Brown because D.W., Arthur's little sister, scared Arthur and he jumped. Then his candy fell on the ground and then D.W.'s bag fell and broke. I thought it was funny, but I would not want that to happen to me." -- Antonio Robinson, Leithwalk Elementary "The story 'Matilda' by Roald Dahl is my favorite book. It is about a girl named Matilda who learns to read and do math by herself. When her parents send her to school, her teacher is amazed.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
" 'Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator' by Roald Dahl is about a flying, giant elevator. When it picks up speed, Charlie, Willy Wonka and everyone else inside goes hurtling through space and time." -- Kiara Cooper, Eutaw-Marshburn Elementary "I like 'Henry and the Paper Route' by Beverly Cleary because it is a book about something that could really happen. I like Henry, because he always goes to the dog and also gets into trouble. I think you will like this book." -- Kevin O'Neil, Seneca Elementary "I recommend 'Sideways Stories from the Wayside School' by Louis Sachar.
NEWS
December 1, 1990
College Park AMONG THE speakers at a conference of this week at the University of Maryland to explore the post-Cold War world was a man named Roald Sagdeev. On both the personal and public level, this soft-spoken scientist and scholar embodies the dramatic events that have taken place during his 58 years.Soviet Russia had existed for just 14 years when he was born in 1932 in Moscow. Stalin was about to impose a reign of terror which would claim 20 million lives. By the time Roald was 8, the Soviet Union was at war with Germany -- a conflict that would claim the lives of another 25 million of his countrymen, and leave Stalin still in control.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Attempts to ban school materials hit a 12-year high across the country last year, with Maryland as the state with the fifth-highest number of challenges, according to a report released yesterday in Washington by People for the American Way.The liberal organization that acts as a watchdog against book-banning said it confirmed 462 cases where parents or others challenged books in the 1993-1994 school year.Three of the 20 challenges in Maryland succeeded in removing the material: Carroll County schools removed two books from their libraries -- "Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes" and "A Deadly Game" by Anita Jackson -- after parents complained of violence and language.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
" 'Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator' by Roald Dahl is about a flying, giant elevator. When it picks up speed, Charlie, Willy Wonka and everyone else inside goes hurtling through space and time." -- Kiara Cooper, Eutaw-Marshburn Elementary "I like 'Henry and the Paper Route' by Beverly Cleary because it is a book about something that could really happen. I like Henry, because he always goes to the dog and also gets into trouble. I think you will like this book." -- Kevin O'Neil, Seneca Elementary "I recommend 'Sideways Stories from the Wayside School' by Louis Sachar.
FEATURES
February 23, 2000
"I would recommend 'Arthur's Halloween' by Marc Tolon Brown because D.W., Arthur's little sister, scared Arthur and he jumped. Then his candy fell on the ground and then D.W.'s bag fell and broke. I thought it was funny, but I would not want that to happen to me." -- Antonio Robinson, Leithwalk Elementary "The story 'Matilda' by Roald Dahl is my favorite book. It is about a girl named Matilda who learns to read and do math by herself. When her parents send her to school, her teacher is amazed.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
It seems so logical that you wonder why somebody didn't think of it before. No two sensibilities are more perfectly matched than those of Danny DeVito and Roald Dahl. Both are mean, rotten, scary, nasty and vicious. Perfectly matched for each other and perfect for a kid's movie!So here's "Matilda," based on a book by Dahl and directed by and starring DeVito, which is, just as I had hoped, mean, rotten, scary, nasty and vicious. Kids will love it, little beasts that they are. And for the longest time, it's terrific.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Attempts to ban school materials hit a 12-year high across the country last year, with Maryland as the state with the fifth-highest number of challenges, according to a report released yesterday in Washington by People for the American Way.The liberal organization that acts as a watchdog against book-banning said it confirmed 462 cases where parents or others challenged books in the 1993-1994 school year.Three of the 20 challenges in Maryland succeeded in removing the material: Carroll County schools removed two books from their libraries -- "Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes" and "A Deadly Game" by Anita Jackson -- after parents complained of violence and language.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | January 10, 1994
One book talks about roasting, toasting, stewing and chewing slugs.And an irreverent parody by the late Roald Dahl has an uncharming prince call Cinderella a "dirty slut," after he has lopped off the heads of her two stepsisters.Each book has been challenged by a Carroll County parent as inappropriate for elementary school libraries, although both books have been in use for about 10 years in the county, since they were published.The Roald Dahl book has been pulled from the half-dozen Carroll school libraries that carried it, and "Slugs" could follow it if the school board agrees with the parent, who will make his case at a meeting Wednesday.
NEWS
December 1, 1990
College Park AMONG THE speakers at a conference of this week at the University of Maryland to explore the post-Cold War world was a man named Roald Sagdeev. On both the personal and public level, this soft-spoken scientist and scholar embodies the dramatic events that have taken place during his 58 years.Soviet Russia had existed for just 14 years when he was born in 1932 in Moscow. Stalin was about to impose a reign of terror which would claim 20 million lives. By the time Roald was 8, the Soviet Union was at war with Germany -- a conflict that would claim the lives of another 25 million of his countrymen, and leave Stalin still in control.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | January 10, 1994
One book talks about roasting, toasting, stewing and chewing slugs.And an irreverent parody by the late Roald Dahl has an uncharming prince call Cinderella a "dirty slut," after he has lopped off the heads of her two stepsisters.Each book has been challenged by a Carroll County parent as inappropriate for elementary school libraries, although both books have been in use for about 10 years in the county, since they were published.The Roald Dahl book has been pulled from the half-dozen Carroll school libraries that carried it, and "Slugs" could follow it if the school board agrees with the parent, who will make his case at a meeting Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
It seems so logical that you wonder why somebody didn't think of it before. No two sensibilities are more perfectly matched than those of Danny DeVito and Roald Dahl. Both are mean, rotten, scary, nasty and vicious. Perfectly matched for each other and perfect for a kid's movie!So here's "Matilda," based on a book by Dahl and directed by and starring DeVito, which is, just as I had hoped, mean, rotten, scary, nasty and vicious. Kids will love it, little beasts that they are. And for the longest time, it's terrific.
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder | November 27, 1990
Before the first crisp chapter of "Matilda" is done with, Roald Dahl, who died Friday from an undisclosed infection at age 74, has skewered doting parents and parents who are just the opposite. Of the former, Dahl sneers, "It's a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful."And then there are those -- even worse, he says -- who treat their children like scabs: "A scab is something you have to put up with until the time comes when you can pick if off and flick it away."
FEATURES
By Abby Karp | November 26, 1990
You learn the most surprising things from obituaries sometimes, and when I read the one about Roald Dahl, the celebrated children's author who died Friday at the age of 74, my mouth dropped open.Who would believe this man -- whose books describe so scathingly the warts and foibles and inexplicable cruelty of adults -- also had written the screenplay for the cheerful, optimistic, downright uplifting movie "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang?"The Roald Dahl I knew didn't have Dick Van Dyke in his vocabulary.
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