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Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
As part of its public offering roadshow, Facebook executives met Tuesday evening with managers of T. Rowe Price, whose stake in the social media company could be worth as much as $637 million in the public market. Price owns more than 18 million Facebook shares in its mutual funds as well as in accounts it manages for clients, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Facebook priced its initial public offering between $28 and $35 per share, which means Price's holdings could range from $509 million to $637 million.
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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
About 30 minutes after the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team had wrapped up a 13-8 victory over visiting Albany on April 4, three players were still standing on the Homewood Field turf, signing autographs and posing for pictures with fans. That trio did not represent the home team, though. They were Miles, Ty and Lyle Thompson, the starting attackmen for the Great Danes. "One of my favorite moments of the season was when we had lost that game at Hopkins and you looked on the field and there were only three kids on the field signing autographs, and it was those three," Albany coach Scott Marr said.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 7, 2008
A snowscape painting purchased for $150 is now valued at $70,000, and the owner cannot stop giggling when she gets the news - until she literally loses her breath and starts to gasp for air. A Kwakiutl ceremonial mask bought for $4,000 by a guy who sounds like a real wheeler-dealer is appraised at only $2,000 - it's not authentic - and the suddenly speechless owner looks as if he's been punched in the gut. On TV Antiques Roadshow airs at 8 tonight on...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
James Callear flipped back and forth between his laptop and a fat stack of books as he tried to assign a value to a set of Hull pottery for Bonnie Crabbs at an American Legion post in Westminster. Crabbs was among dozens who brought their antiques to be appraised Saturday as part of a fundraiser for the Historical Society of Carroll County - and among those who went home pleasantly surprised. Callear, who has an antiques business in Barnesville, narrowed down the pottery to a kind made between 1949 and 1950, figuring a yellow pottery basket might fetch $135 and two small candleholders as much as $225 each.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
Pack rats who were unable to get themselves inside the Convention Center when "Antiques Roadshow" came to town last year, worry not. Tonight on CNN, you'll get the chance to look behind-the-scenes of one of PBS' most popular series. Tonight's "CNN Newsstand" will feature a backstage look at the "Roadshow," courtesy of correspondent Bruce Burkhardt. Included in the hourlong show is an interview with a woman who realized a dream many of us have had: a table she bought for $25 was appraised at nearly $1 million.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | March 8, 1991
The venerable Senator Theatre, on York Road, has slated a "most-requested" festival with a program of 70-mm "roadshow" pictures.The theater will show "West Side Story" beginning Friday for a week; "The Sound of Music" from March 22-April 4; "Doctor Zhivago" April 5-18; "Ben-Hur" April 19-May 2; and, on May 3, the newly restored print of what many critics at the time called the most intelligent epic ever made, Stanley Kubrick's great "Spartacus," with Kirk...
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | August 2, 2007
They brought pitchers and paintings, candlestick holders and a clock that chimed pleasantly every 15 minutes or so. And then they waited - anxiously - to see whether an appraiser from the PBS series Antiques Roadshow would pick up their precious possession to opine about. "We are, ourselves, antiques, so we're always interested in old stuff," quipped Arthur Bushel, 86, of Owings Mills, who brought an old pocket watch that he inherited from an uncle who managed a department store in Germany.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2001
Are those old Hot Wheels toy cars and Barbie dolls stored in the attic worth something? Anyone who owns old toys can find out whether there's a market for them today through Friday in Annapolis. The International Toy Collectors Association Toy Roadshow will not appraise the items. But association representatives say they will tap their 5,400 members, some of whom might offer to buy toys on the spot through phone auctions. But toy experts caution that sellers should check their toys' worth in advance.
NEWS
May 14, 2006
Gillespie V. "Sonny" Montgomery, 85, who during his 30 years representing east-central Mississippi in Congress pushed through a modernized GI Bill that boosted recruiting for the all-volunteer force, died Friday at a hospital in Meridian, Miss. He had undergone surgery to correct a bowel obstruction in December. A conservative Democrat, Mr. Montgomery served in the House of Representatives from 1967 to 1997, and for 13 years chaired the House Veterans Affairs Committee. Frank Boos, 70, the bow-tied appraiser on the PBS program Antiques Roadshow, died of complications from vascular disease Tuesday at his home in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
James Callear flipped back and forth between his laptop and a fat stack of books as he tried to assign a value to a set of Hull pottery for Bonnie Crabbs at an American Legion post in Westminster. Crabbs was among dozens who brought their antiques to be appraised Saturday as part of a fundraiser for the Historical Society of Carroll County - and among those who went home pleasantly surprised. Callear, who has an antiques business in Barnesville, narrowed down the pottery to a kind made between 1949 and 1950, figuring a yellow pottery basket might fetch $135 and two small candleholders as much as $225 each.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 14, 2013
In 1970, one of Barbara Bonnell's favorite art galleries purchased a set of 12 framed, antique lithographs - one for each month of the year - for a client who, as it turned out, didn't want them after all. The gallery called Bonnell, then of Guilford, to see if she would be interested in buying them. She and her husband, Robert Bonnell Jr., paid $2,500 for the set, which dates to 1802. On Wednesday, Bonnell, 82, now a resident of Roland Park Place and chair of its residents' association, brought the August lithograph, of a woman and her child, downstairs to the dining room to get it appraised at a "treasure hunting" event sponsored by the retirement community and modeled after "Antiques Roadshow" on TV. Bonnell guessed that the set, made in Paris, France, would be worth about $3,000 now. She was wrong.
BUSINESS
Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
As part of its public offering roadshow, Facebook executives met Tuesday evening with managers of T. Rowe Price, whose stake in the social media company could be worth as much as $637 million in the public market. Price owns more than 18 million Facebook shares in its mutual funds as well as in accounts it manages for clients, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Facebook priced its initial public offering between $28 and $35 per share, which means Price's holdings could range from $509 million to $637 million.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 7, 2008
A snowscape painting purchased for $150 is now valued at $70,000, and the owner cannot stop giggling when she gets the news - until she literally loses her breath and starts to gasp for air. A Kwakiutl ceremonial mask bought for $4,000 by a guy who sounds like a real wheeler-dealer is appraised at only $2,000 - it's not authentic - and the suddenly speechless owner looks as if he's been punched in the gut. On TV Antiques Roadshow airs at 8 tonight on...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
An outdoor triple feature from Baltimore's connoisseur of bad taste, John Waters, is on tap tonight at Middlebranch Park, 3301 Waterview Ave. Part of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema's Rolling Roadshow Tour, tonight's fest of Waters' best includes the nonmusical version of Hairspray (1988); Polyester (1981), an ode to life in suburbia starring Divine and Tab Hunter; and Desperate Living (1977), all about life in a garbage dump-cum-homeless shelter known as Mortville. As if that lineup isn't enough, the first 250 people to show up will get a free limited-edition Odorama card, essential for experiencing Polyester in all its glory.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | August 2, 2007
They brought pitchers and paintings, candlestick holders and a clock that chimed pleasantly every 15 minutes or so. And then they waited - anxiously - to see whether an appraiser from the PBS series Antiques Roadshow would pick up their precious possession to opine about. "We are, ourselves, antiques, so we're always interested in old stuff," quipped Arthur Bushel, 86, of Owings Mills, who brought an old pocket watch that he inherited from an uncle who managed a department store in Germany.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | June 16, 2007
The period is Edwardian. The legs are New York. And the heart-shaped back is all Baltimore. In the bowels of the Baltimore Convention Center, appraiser Mike Flanigan ran his fingers along the carved rim of a chair that had been in my family for at least a century but about which we knew virtually nothing. "It belonged to my grandmother, and that's about all we know," said my own grandmother, Elizabeth Kreis. In that bare detail, the piece was typical of the thousands that make their way to Antiques Roadshow every year: They've been around forever, maybe in a closet or attic, perhaps lovingly cared for, but the history and the value are great unknowns.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
As host of "Antiques Roadshow" on PBS, Chris Jussel has seen a lot of objects over the past three years.But he does have his favorites -- like the letter in Atlanta that was written by Abraham Lincoln when he was a young man."[The owner] brought it in and unfolded it, and it was like seeing it for the first time -- it was in pristine condition," Jussel said. An auction-house expert later valued the letter at $75,000 to $100,000.It doesn't always happen like that."Most of what we see are not really great treasures," said Jussel, a former antiques dealer in New York.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
With names like "Rock the Vote" and sponsors like MTV, voter-registration bus tours have largely been the province of young activists looking to recruit first-timers to the democratic process. But that was the U.S. Chamber of Commerce parked outside a Federal Hill bar yesterday, the start of a monthlong drive to get out the business-friendly vote. Maryland was the first of 12 states to be visited by the "Vote for Business Bandwagon." "We're looking at key states this year in the House and Senate races," said Chad Mitchell, executive director of grass-roots and advocacy programs for the chamber.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
With names like "Rock the Vote" and sponsors like MTV, voter-registration bus tours have largely been the province of young activists looking to recruit first-timers to the democratic process. But that was the U.S. Chamber of Commerce parked outside a Federal Hill bar yesterday, the start of a monthlong drive to get out the business-friendly vote. Maryland was the first of 12 states to be visited by the "Vote for Business Bandwagon." "We're looking at key states this year in the House and Senate races," said Chad Mitchell, executive director of grass-roots and advocacy programs for the chamber.
NEWS
May 14, 2006
Gillespie V. "Sonny" Montgomery, 85, who during his 30 years representing east-central Mississippi in Congress pushed through a modernized GI Bill that boosted recruiting for the all-volunteer force, died Friday at a hospital in Meridian, Miss. He had undergone surgery to correct a bowel obstruction in December. A conservative Democrat, Mr. Montgomery served in the House of Representatives from 1967 to 1997, and for 13 years chaired the House Veterans Affairs Committee. Frank Boos, 70, the bow-tied appraiser on the PBS program Antiques Roadshow, died of complications from vascular disease Tuesday at his home in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
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