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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2010
City police have named the officer who fired his weapon last week at a car that was driving away after ignoring a roadblock. Officer Richard J. McCarthy, a 25-year veteran and member of the accident investigation unit, is on administrative suspension as homicide detectives investigate the Friday afternoon shooting. The victim, a 56-year-old man, was injured when he crashed his pickup truck into a wall on Falls Road in Hampden after the officer fired at his back window. Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III said Friday that McCarthy had blocked the ramp to Interstate 83 at West 28th Street to allow a wide-load vehicle to go through.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
Last month, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz wrote a letter to Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith Jr. indicating his displeasure with certain aspects of the proposed Red Line light rail project. He doesn't want the county to contribute nearly as much as the state has proposed, and he wants the county's portion of the 14-mile line to be built in an "early phase" of construction. But that doesn't really capture the sheer audacity of the letter. That Mr. Kamenetz would make such demands on such a major transportation project is truly the tail wagging the dog. What he is barking at is a mere $50 million contribution - compared to financially-strapped Baltimore's expected $200 million share.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Michael James and Peter Hermann and Michael James,Sun Staff Writers | December 17, 1994
In the heart of Baltimore's downtown, every vehicle got stopped, from the limousines to the buses to the beat-up pickup trucks.The location for Thursday night's drunken-driving roadblock on Lombard Street near Market Place was a prime spot to catch all kinds of people -- from the tipsy businessman coming from a Christmas party to the drunken factory worker on his way home after too many nightcaps."
NEWS
March 29, 2014
A decade ago, the redevelopment of the state office complex in midtown Baltimore — now known as State Center — looked like a no-brainer. Built in the 1950s and 1960s, the five buildings in the 28-acre complex, which hadn't exactly been architecturally inspired to begin with, needed to be replaced. And the site's access to Baltimore's Metro subway system suggested great potential for transit-oriented development. But wait, it was even better than that. State Center is also convenient to the city's major cultural attractions and to the light rail line as well as MARC commuter rail, so state and city officials thought big — a $1.5 billion mixed use project with apartments for a variety of income levels, a grocery store and shopping as well as a parking garage and office space for state employees, all of which could be accomplished as a public-private partnership.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 25, 2000
JERUSALEM - The road to Ramallah is a wave away for Fouad Badra. These days, as the taxi cab driver heads toward the Palestinian city, he comes to an Israeli Army roadblock at the edge of town. Then, he gets the wave, from an Israeli soldier with a machine gun on his shoulder. It is a simple gesture meaning: Turn back. Road closed. To some Palestinians, the Israeli roadblocks have become a focal point of their anger. For Badra, they are a nuisance that has cost him money. Badra, a Palestinian resident of Jerusalem, carries an Israeli identity card.
NEWS
By Jan C. Greenburg and Jan C. Greenburg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 14, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that police can stop drivers simply to seek information about a crime, a decision that gives law enforcement greater power to set up roadblocks even if they are not in immediate pursuit of the suspect. Reversing a decision by the Illinois Supreme Court, the justices ruled 6-3 that a roadblock set up by police in west suburban Lombard, Ill., did not violate the rights of a driver subsequently arrested and convicted of driving under the influence.
NEWS
February 22, 2010
The Sun's Feb. 21 edition carried a fairly extensive report on the career of Alexander Haig who died the previous day. Missing from James Oliphant's obituary ("A sculptor of war and politics") was any mention of Secretary of State Haig's take on the deaths of four Catholic religious women in El Salvador in December 1980. It is his testimony before Congress that told me more about this "respected" soldier and statesman than I ever wanted to know. Mr. Haig eagerly testified that these devout women, three nuns and a laywoman, widely venerated for their dedication to the poor and oppressed, may have been killed because they ran a military roadblock.
NEWS
By Timothy Egan and Timothy Egan,New York Times News Service | August 26, 1992
NAPLES, Idaho -- To hear the supporters of Randy Weaver tell it, the man holding off nearly 200 police officers and federal agents from his mountaintop cabin here is not the violent racist depicted by the authorities. But rather, as with other notorious fugitives who have found refuge in this remote wilderness just south of the Canadian border, he is a folk hero.In the five days since a deputy U.S. marshal, William F. Degan, and Mr. Weaver's son, Samuel, 13, were killed in a shootout, crowds of people have been steadily harassing the officers who are trying to detain the fugitive.
NEWS
April 24, 1991
State police are investigating the theft of approximately $80,000 worth of seafood that has been stolen in three incidents from the GiantFood warehouse in Jessup.Three pallets of frozen lobster tails and 980 cases of canned tuna were stolen, police said. The thefts werediscovered Saturday during an inventory check.The most recent theft is believed to have occurred Friday evening, while another theft apparently occurred three weeks ago. Giant officials say they also believe some of the food was taken in January.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
In their first drunken-driving roadblock, Baltimore police stopped everyone from bus drivers to moped riders -- and even a U.S. representative who wants to be the next governor of Maryland."
NEWS
January 31, 2014
Many, many kudos to The Baltimore Sun for its front page article on Maryland's failure to people with some disabilities and those who suffer in extreme pain due to inexplicable roadblocks to authorize medical marijuana ( "Medical marijuana still beyond reach in Maryland," Jan. 28). We hear many excuses spun as "reasons. " Yes, it's still banned by the federal government, but 20 states and the District of Columbia have chosen to help people instead. Two states have even legalized marijuana for recreational use. To my knowledge, doctors have not lost their licenses to practice medicine.
NEWS
By Harry Alford | March 6, 2013
With many important issues before the Maryland legislature this year, it is a shame to see time and effort being wasted on unnecessary proposals regarding natural gas development in our state. Pursuing such legislation right now is putting the cart before the horse — and could have a significant negative impact on our economy and efforts to create new jobs. Let's look at the facts. Today, there is no natural gas development under way in Maryland. In fact, there currently is a moratorium on gas development in place until summer 2014, due to an executive order signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Daniel Erchick | July 31, 2012
On July 26, 1990, when President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on the lawn of the White House, I was too young be in attendance, or even understand the impact that this monumental law would have on the United States by protecting the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities. People like me. About two weeks ago, an email popped into my inbox explaining that the Senate had scheduled a hearing to discuss U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | November 28, 2011
Are your bellies laden with Thanksgiving leftovers? Would you like to vicariously burn some calories by watching people race around the world? Great! Except tonight, it's not so much racing around the world as it is racing cars and pigeons in Belgium, and it's not so much about burning calories because it's Waffle Time! Quick, someone write me a theme song for Waffle Time. I bet you forgot that last week was a cliffhanger, right? I had a six-hour drive to my Thanksgiving dinner, so it slipped my mind, too. But this isn't [all]
NEWS
November 18, 2011
America is a product of the Age of Reason. Our founders used their rational powers to free us from the ignorance and superstition that shackled less enlightened societies. For over two centuries, we have assumed that the Age of Reason was here to stay, a permanent flowering of our intellectual growth. Alas, the anti-planning hysteria in parts of Maryland reveals that the Age of Reason may have been just a phase, one that is ending as we regress to the magical thinking of centuries past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | October 24, 2011
In this week's Amazing Race, Phil takes the great big Deck of Racing Cards and flings it up into the air. Rankings shift everywhere, then again. You want Ugly Americans? We got 'em. You want helpful locals? We got 'em. You want elephants? We got those, too, and their poop doesn't stink. For real. Last week the teams were left in a city built on stilts. In a 3 ½ hour time span, they trickle out of the city and onto some local transportation: the nimble Indian elephant. The elephant journey takes them down a river for a quick “find a clue in the bottom of a pool” Roadblock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | September 25, 2011
What's new this season? Some older folks, some minor celebrities (if you rank them midway on a scale from “cave-dwelling hermit” to “the cast of 'Jersey Shore'), and a dating couple who are here to test-drive their relationship. Oh, wait, that's every season. The race begins in California, and after a quick scavenger hunt to find the first clue, the teams head to the airport to fly to Taiwan. Which brings us to: THE MOST AMAZING THING TO EVER HAPPEN ON "THE AMAZING RACE": Kaylani and Lisa are former Vegas Showgirls who promise us that they are not dumb.
EXPLORE
Kathy Hudson | October 21, 2011
On Wednesday I went to Whole Foods in Mount Washington. When I came out, the line of traffic leaving Whole Foods extended from the back of the parking lot to Falls Road. It did not budge.    A bus and a pickup apparently had collided at the entrance of the narrow Smith Avenue bridge. Neither vehicle could move until the police came and photographs were taken. No cars could go over the bridge in either direction. Gridlock lasted about an hour.     Mail trucks lined up along Falls Road waiting to turn to go over the bridge.
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