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Peter Schmuck | November 6, 2010
It's time for the Ravens to introduce the Miami Dolphins to a term that they probably haven't heard this year. Road kill. The Dolphins seem to have found a comfort zone on the road, as evidenced by their 4-0 record away from home and their inexplicable inability to register a victory at Dolphins Stadium. It's a highly unusual dichotomy which needs to be corrected on Sunday at M&T Bank Stadium. The oddsmakers obviously aren't impressed. They've installed the Ravens as a 5 1/2-point favorite to come off their bye week and show the Dolphins what it's like to play in a truly hostile environment — and I'm not just talking about the decibel level on the field.
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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The rise of this city in Harford County and its decline owed much to U.S. 40 and the car-centric culture of 20th century America. From World War II to the 1960s, motels and gas stations sprouted along the main road from Baltimore to Philadelphia to accommodate road-weary travelers. Diners served up coffee and gossip to neighbors and road-trippers alike on what was also the main local drag. But when Interstate 95 opened, running parallel to U.S. 40 just a few miles to the west, the flow of out-of-town cars slowed to a trickle.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 11, 1990
Sun columnist Roger Simon's new book, "Road Show," was published last month to excellent reviews -- with the exception of a somewhat mixed one in The Sun. But then our reviewer worked for the Bush-Quayle ticket during the 1988 presidential campaign, so you can't blame him for being a little prickly about what Roger had to say. You'll see why in our excerpt from "Road Show," which starts on Page 12. What you won't be able to tell -- unless you read the...
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
The Orioles open their three-game series here with their third straight day game. The O's are coming off a big series win over the Yankees in the Bronx and hope they can continue that at Rogers Centre, where they are just 7-33 in their past 40 games. Some pregame fodder for you: -- The Orioles added left-handed reliever Zach Phillips before the game today and designated right-handed Jason Berken to make room for him on the 40-man roster. Phillips was already in the Orioles' September roster plans, but they need the extra left-handed arm. Brian Matusz has pitched in three straight games and Randy Wolf threw 3 1/3 innings in yesterday's 8-3 win over the Yankees.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
Cecil Adcock, a mature gentleman in a tweedy cap, opens up the brown cardboard box with the gravity of a man unpacking an ancient family heirloom -- and like an ironic magician he pulls out a toy cowboy on a tin horse, twirling a lasso.He dug it out of his basement and brought it for appraisal to the Antique Toy Road Show, which is set up for the next couple of days at the Holiday Inn Select in Timonium."You're looking at $225," says George McCurley judiciously. He's the major domo of this road company production of the International Toy Collectors Association, of Athens, Ill., where they pronounce Athens AY-thens.
NEWS
July 7, 1996
Muwaffaq al-Allaf, 70, a former Syrian negotiator with Israel and assistant secretary-general of the Arab League, died Thursday of a heart attack in Cairo. He was named assistant secretary-general of the Arab League last year after serving as Syria's chief negotiator with Israel at peace talks in Washington.Ralph Edward Mahoney, 84, a retired national editor and consultant for the Hearst newspapers, died Tuesday in Frenchtown, N.J., after a long illness. He first worked for the Hearst papers in 1957, as a rewrite editor and feature writer for the New York Journal-American.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH YURGEALITIS | March 9, 2006
Road show release party The lowdown -- The Swing States Road Show, a politically active group composed of several WAMMIE Award-winning instrumentalists, will play the Cat's Eye Pub in Fells Point on Tuesday. The concert will celebrate the release of the group's latest album, Housecleaning. If you go -- The pub is at 1730 Thames St. The music starts at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Admission is free for the 21-and-over show. For more information, call 410-276-9866 or visit catseyepub.com. ST. PATRICK'S BENEFIT AT LOYOLA The lowdown -- Bring in St. Patty's Day with a bang.
NEWS
By Diane Camper | November 20, 2004
BILL COSBY'S traveling road show on moral values came to Baltimore this week and brought down the house. During an appearance before 1,400 parents, teachers and students at W.E.B. DuBois High School, Mr. Cosby was greeted with several standing ovations as he talked about touchy subjects such as out-of-wedlock births, absentee fathers and a greater need for personal responsibility among African-Americans. This was hardly the firestorm he created several months ago at a 50th anniversary celebration of Brown vs. Board of Education, when he took lower-income black parents to task for, among other things, caring more about expensive sneakers than books for their kids.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Kolbert and Elizabeth Kolbert,New York Times News Service | July 24, 1995
Here's the idea: Five young people who have never met board a Winnebago and set off across the country. Every few days, they get a new clue -- in a pouch around a dog's neck, for example -- that presents them with a new destination and a new challenge, like working at an alligator farm or parachuting out of a plane.Their adventures, their fights, their accomplishments and their whining -- in short their every move -- is recorded by video cameras.This is the idea behind "Road Rules," a new MTV series on Monday nights at 10 for the next 13 weeks.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 30, 1995
ATLANTA -- Unable to capture the spotlight in Washington while the Republican revolution rolls through Congress, President Clinton opened a road show here yesterday in the capital of the South.The declared purpose of his visit was to conduct a daylong conference at Emory University on the Southern economy, but the underlying motive was an effort to help boost Mr. Clinton's popularity."I think, right now, President Clinton would lose every Southern state and would be close only in Arkansas," said Merle Black, a noted regional political analyst at Emory.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
John F. Kennedy once remarked that sailing was in the blood of every American, saying that "all of us have in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean. ... We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea — whether it is to sail or to watch it — we are going back from whence we came. " The only problem with the then-president's speech, made on the eve of the 1962 America's Cup races, was that a large percentage of the U.S. population had never been on a sailboat.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
In 2001, when Gov. Parris N. Glendening appointed a five-member advisory commission on the redrawing of legislative and congressional district lines, some questioned whether the entire exercise — including a dozen public hearings — would all be for show. Some speculated at the time that it would not be the desires of the various communities about how they should be joined together in districts that would determine the final maps but, rather, cold political calculations made behind closed doors in the governor's office — calculations made to reward friends, punish enemies and, overall, get more Democrats into elected office.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 6, 2010
It's time for the Ravens to introduce the Miami Dolphins to a term that they probably haven't heard this year. Road kill. The Dolphins seem to have found a comfort zone on the road, as evidenced by their 4-0 record away from home and their inexplicable inability to register a victory at Dolphins Stadium. It's a highly unusual dichotomy which needs to be corrected on Sunday at M&T Bank Stadium. The oddsmakers obviously aren't impressed. They've installed the Ravens as a 5 1/2-point favorite to come off their bye week and show the Dolphins what it's like to play in a truly hostile environment — and I'm not just talking about the decibel level on the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
All the recession talk on TV got you down? Need a break from all the gloom-and-doom on the cable channels and their shouting, arm-waving, spittle-flicking financial gurus? Sure you do. So tune in at 9 tonight to MPT's Eatin' Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had, which chronicles a rollicking road trip in search of "Crabcake Heaven." It's part of the station's Chesapeake Bay Week programming. OK, maybe you can't even afford a crab cake these days. But you can live vicariously through host and "crab cake connoisseur" Doug Roberts, who sampled crab cakes from downtown Baltimore to the back roads of the Eastern Shore, not to mention a church in Annapolis and a restaurant in Washington.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | March 2, 2009
Raleigh, N.C. - Entering last night's game, Maryland had a potentially damaging gap in its NCAA tournament resume. The Terrapins, who have beaten potent North Carolina and Michigan State, had only one road victory in six tries in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Last night, Maryland made amends, burnishing its postseason credentials with a 71-60 win over North Carolina State at the RBC Center. "I told [teammates] before halftime, 'If we lose this game, it's pretty much over,' " said forward Dave Neal, Maryland's only senior.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Reporter | July 28, 2008
In a quiet corner of a State Highway Administration shop in Anne Arundel County, Theodric Clark painstakingly applies black paint to the raised metal letters of the historical sign identifying Deep Falls, the ancestral St. Mary's County estate of Gov. James Thomas (1833-1836). The cast-iron sign bears dents from bullets that scarred this memorial to the state's first Whig chief executive, but sandblasting has restored the decades-old marker to its original luster and the newly repainted letters pop out from the silvery surface.
FEATURES
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,HARTFORD COURANT | August 12, 2003
Say you were an advertising executive eager to promote your brand or product to the most coveted demographic - young people. You'd be looking for the most effective way to make them aware of what you have to sell, and you'd have a variety of options: TV, newspapers, radio, magazines and so on. But all of those media require the target audience to come to you. What if you could go to them? Perhaps you'd do what Major League Baseball, Subway and Kellogg's are doing this summer and sponsor a big-name concert tour.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1994
A little over a year ago, when Ted Neeley took the stage in Baltimore to launch a road show reprise of "Jesus Christ Superstar," he figured he'd sing the rock opera messiah for another three months, tops.But behold: The revival that sold out the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre for four weeks in December and January last year returns tomorrow for a six-day stay at the Lyric Opera House.And Mr. Neeley still plays Jesus."The way it looks from this point, we could do this tour forever," marvels Mr. Neeley, the Texas-born rock musician who originated the role in the 1971 Andrew Lloyd Weber/Tim Rice Broadway musical.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | February 15, 2007
It is 5:40 a.m., but many of the dozen or so workers gathered at the State Highway Administration's operations center have been on the job for hours, monitoring a bank of large and larger TV screens for signs of how well officials are coping with the most challenging storm so far this year. On the screens are constantly changing scenes of early morning traffic slogging along slushy highways across the state -- ghostly headlights cutting through snow and sleet as snowplow crews labor to clear the pavement.
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