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By Elizabeth Kolbert and Elizabeth Kolbert,New York Times News Service | July 24, 1995
Here's the idea: Five young people who have never met board a Winnebago and set off across the country. Every few days, they get a new clue -- in a pouch around a dog's neck, for example -- that presents them with a new destination and a new challenge, like working at an alligator farm or parachuting out of a plane.Their adventures, their fights, their accomplishments and their whining -- in short their every move -- is recorded by video cameras.This is the idea behind "Road Rules," a new MTV series on Monday nights at 10 for the next 13 weeks.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | June 20, 2007
How would Jesus drive? A Vatican commission issued guidelines yesterday reminding drivers not to ignore Christian principles and to respect life - and the rules of the road - as they shift into gear. The Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People acknowledges the prominence of the automobile in society with its warnings against the use of vehicles in the "occasion of sin," such as road rage, prostitution and trafficking of people. "Guidelines for the Pastoral Care of the Road" is a four-part document that also addresses the needs of prostitutes, street children and the homeless.
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NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
Wearing a suit, a tie and shiny loafers and clutching a briefcase, Kristofer Mickens is hardly what audiences have come to expect from an MTV "Real World" housemate.Still, the 23-year-old actor -- one of 662 "Real World" wannabes at the Inner Harbor Planet Hollywood yesterday auditioning to become a cast member for the eighth season of the Gen-X documentary -- was pretty sure he would make it."I'm not worried about that at all," he said, standing confidently upright at the front of the line.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 25, 2005
So your teenager just got his or her learner's permit and is going out driving with you for the first time. You're wondering how to handle it. Don't worry, it's not that hard. I've taught two kids how to drive. I can walk you through it. As soon as the kid gets in and buckles the seat belt, say: "You're going too fast." I like to get that one out of the way early. It sets the tone. You really can't say it enough. Fifty or 60 times is about right. OK, now the kid puts it in reverse and starts to back out of the driveway.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Imagine a Winnebago decked out just as MTV-perfect as the "Real World" condo, and you've got the living quarters for the five adventurers of the show's spin-off, "Road Rules."In the second season of this country-spanning voyage, the youngsters pick up a series of clues at various locales that direct them toward destinations where they perform escapades from environmentally correct shark-tagging, to sky diving, to buying Cheez Whiz -- all while still looking really good.Forced to live on a fixed budget, the participants must give up all their plastic money and learn to cooperate financially, as well.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 25, 2005
So your teenager just got his or her learner's permit and is going out driving with you for the first time. You're wondering how to handle it. Don't worry, it's not that hard. I've taught two kids how to drive. I can walk you through it. As soon as the kid gets in and buckles the seat belt, say: "You're going too fast." I like to get that one out of the way early. It sets the tone. You really can't say it enough. Fifty or 60 times is about right. OK, now the kid puts it in reverse and starts to back out of the driveway.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2004
IN NOVEMBER, I first mentioned signaling slower drivers in front to move to the right by flickering your headlights. One reader received a ticket in Delaware, in part because he had done just that. Another reader also had been pulled over in Maryland, but received only a warning against "aggressive driving." In a follow-up column, I addressed the illegality of flashing headlights at other drivers. Ted Leffler's been thinking about that column ever since. "This notion that flashing your lights to another driver on the highway is evidence of `aggressive driving' is worth reconsideration," he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Slogging toward a way to make large village-style developments more acceptable to residents, the Howard County Council has made a decision: one more meeting.A work session discussion yesterday produced no agreement on what council members agree is the crucial element of Councilman Guy J. Guzzone's bill to tighten regulations on mixed-use developments (MXD) -- roads.Guzzone, a Laurel-Savage Democrat, presented his colleagues with seven options -- ranging from requiring that roads be open before each phase of development starts to grandfathering approvals for two proposed developments in Laurel and Fulton.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | June 20, 2007
How would Jesus drive? A Vatican commission issued guidelines yesterday reminding drivers not to ignore Christian principles and to respect life - and the rules of the road - as they shift into gear. The Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People acknowledges the prominence of the automobile in society with its warnings against the use of vehicles in the "occasion of sin," such as road rage, prostitution and trafficking of people. "Guidelines for the Pastoral Care of the Road" is a four-part document that also addresses the needs of prostitutes, street children and the homeless.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Concerned about children speeding through town on motorized scooters, ignoring stop signs and riding without lights or helmets, Sykesville officials will take up an ordinance today that would crack down on the problem - with violators facing fines of up to $75 and possible impoundment of their vehicles. "We are not out to bust 6-year-olds or to take away scooters," Mayor Jonathan Herman said of the proposal, which would require riders to follow the rules of the road and use helmets and safety lights.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Concerned about children speeding through town on motorized scooters, ignoring stop signs and riding without lights or helmets, Sykesville officials will take up an ordinance today that would crack down on the problem - with violators facing fines of up to $75 and possible impoundment of their vehicles. "We are not out to bust 6-year-olds or to take away scooters," Mayor Jonathan Herman said of the proposal, which would require riders to follow the rules of the road and use helmets and safety lights.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
Glenn Dowell ticks off a checklist before heading to his midnight-shift job as a trucker for Fleet Transit Inc. "License, money, keys, calculator," he says, patting different pockets in his maroon-and-black company uniform. He grabs a worn plastic mug of coffee, pulls a faded cap over his close-cropped silver hair and kisses his wife, Linda, goodbye. "Be careful," she says, closing the door of their home on Baltimore County's east side. "Please be careful." Her words aren't spoken -- or taken -- lightly.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2004
IN NOVEMBER, I first mentioned signaling slower drivers in front to move to the right by flickering your headlights. One reader received a ticket in Delaware, in part because he had done just that. Another reader also had been pulled over in Maryland, but received only a warning against "aggressive driving." In a follow-up column, I addressed the illegality of flashing headlights at other drivers. Ted Leffler's been thinking about that column ever since. "This notion that flashing your lights to another driver on the highway is evidence of `aggressive driving' is worth reconsideration," he said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Liz F. Kay and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
In a decision that appears to buttress existing homeowners' rights as developers continue to subdivide in Howard County and other suburbs, the Court of Special Appeals has ruled that a developer could not use a covenanted lot in an existing development to provide access to a new subdivision. The ruling "recognizes both the importance of residential restrictions on property and also recognizes the Circuit Court has the power to enforce covenants," said James M. Connolly, attorney for residents of Beaufort Park, a community off Reservoir Road in Fulton.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 2002
SAROBI, Afghanistan -- The road from Kabul to Torkham on the Pakistani border is among Afghanistan's busiest, and it serves as this isolated nation's historic lifeline to the rest of the world. Like almost every mile of highway here, it lies in ruins. "Right now, it doesn't look like a road, it looks like a trail through the mountains," says Saydhagha Shamal, the gray-bearded chief of Sarobi Power Plant, as a Pakistani truck painted with multicolored eyes and whorls ground up the rutted track a few yards away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez and By Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2000
TUPELO, Miss. - Let's pull off of Route 6 near the shack where Elvis was born - it was 23 years last Wednesday that we lost him in Memphis - and sit on the porch a spell. I want to rock on the swing as the sun goes down and talk to you about driving. By the time you read this, depending on when you got to the paper today, I will have passed some 8,600 miles with a good 1,500 to go. In the past four weeks, I have driven more than I have stopped to look at things.(Exceptions made for Sixth Street in Austin, Texas, and the midnight lamp burning at the Goodrich Avenue house in St. Paul, Minn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez and By Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2000
TUPELO, Miss. - Let's pull off of Route 6 near the shack where Elvis was born - it was 23 years last Wednesday that we lost him in Memphis - and sit on the porch a spell. I want to rock on the swing as the sun goes down and talk to you about driving. By the time you read this, depending on when you got to the paper today, I will have passed some 8,600 miles with a good 1,500 to go. In the past four weeks, I have driven more than I have stopped to look at things.(Exceptions made for Sixth Street in Austin, Texas, and the midnight lamp burning at the Goodrich Avenue house in St. Paul, Minn.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- A Montgomery County judge sentenced boxer Mike Tyson to two years in jail yesterday for attacking two motorists last summer "in a dramatic example, a tragic example of potentially lethal road rage."A loud groan went up among the 200 people in the courtroom as Judge Stephen Johnson announced his decision: two years on each count of second-degree assault to be served concurrently, with a year suspended on each -- amounting to a one-year sentence.Tyson was taken from the room in handcuffs, with his wife sobbing quietly in the first row of spectators.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Slogging toward a way to make large village-style developments more acceptable to residents, the Howard County Council has made a decision: one more meeting.A work session discussion yesterday produced no agreement on what council members agree is the crucial element of Councilman Guy J. Guzzone's bill to tighten regulations on mixed-use developments (MXD) -- roads.Guzzone, a Laurel-Savage Democrat, presented his colleagues with seven options -- ranging from requiring that roads be open before each phase of development starts to grandfathering approvals for two proposed developments in Laurel and Fulton.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- A Montgomery County judge sentenced boxer Mike Tyson to two years in jail yesterday for attacking two motorists last summer "in a dramatic example, a tragic example of potentially lethal road rage."A loud groan went up among the 200 people in the courtroom as Judge Stephen Johnson announced his decision: two years on each count of second-degree assault to be served concurrently, with a year suspended on each -- amounting to a one-year sentence.Tyson was taken from the room in handcuffs, with his wife sobbing quietly in the first row of spectators.
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