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NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
A19th-century home on the edge of a slave-era African-American community has become a touchstone in the struggle between community preservationists and government officials over a proposed roads project that could demolish it and several other historic homes. Tribble House, named after current owners Evinger and Brenda Tribble, has passed a significant governmental hurdle in the couple's yearlong attempt to preserve the Victorian-style home as a county landmark. The Tribble House is in the Belltown-Mount Pleasant district, a traditionally white community with pockets of African-American neighborhoods.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
A developer wants to build a 160-unit senior housing complex on a stretch of Montgomery Road in Ellicott City that was the object three years ago of a fierce community effort to block a giant home-improvement store. No opposition to J. Chris Pippen's newest plan has surfaced, and officials said it should not affect Howard County's so far stymied efforts to carve out enough land for a new elementary school from nearby V.F.W. Post 7472 and the county's YMCA branch. "I really don't have any objection to the housing," said Jack Reeder, a trustee of Bethel Baptist Church, which is next to the site.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
With the design for a new intersection along Route 32 and access roads nearly complete, the town of Sykesville has yet to find all the money it needs for the $8 million project. Officials, both in the town and the county, would like businesses that stand to benefit from the roadwork to contribute to it. "We are trying to do what is right and fair," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "The state does not want to pay for other people's responsibilities. We are trying to come up with justifiable expenses for all the players.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
The Westminster Common Council last night approved a $730,000 bid to repair city streets worn down by two unusually harsh winters. Hampstead-based C.J. Miller was awarded the city's annual roadway paving contract, said Planning and Public Works Director Thomas B. Beyard. He said the repairs are expected to be completed by mid-November. Beyard said that 19 streets are targeted, including Airport Drive, Tahoma Farm Road, Distillery Lane, Locust Street, Bond Street and Long Valley Road. Staffers rated the city's streets to decide which ones most needed to be repaired.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2004
Neighbors of Parole Plaza are thrilled that it is being redeveloped after years of deterioration, but with the start of demolition only 10 days away, they say they are also worried that the planned mix of stores and high-rise condominiums will push nearby roads from clogged to downright impassable. Greenberg Commercial Corp. of Owings Mills, the developer of the $400 million project, has said it will go beyond county requirements to make traffic flow as smoothly as possible. The state is also building a ramp from U.S. 50 to Solomons Island Road (Route 2)
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2004
Neighbors of Parole Plaza are thrilled that it is being redeveloped after years of deterioration, but with the start of demolition only 10 days away, they say they are also worried that the planned mix of stores and high-rise condominiums will push nearby roads from clogged to downright impassable. Greenberg Commercial Corp. of Owings Mills, the developer of the $400 million project, has said it will go beyond county requirements to make traffic flow as smoothly as possible. The state is also building a ramp from U.S. 50 to Solomons Island Road (Route 2)
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2004
On a typical day, Arnold Greenspun watches over the bustle of elderly patrons and young mothers who stream into his Arnie's Bagel Cafe. The line, he says, can sometimes stretch out the door. But on a recent Wednesday the lunchtime staff nearly outnumbered the patrons, and orange cones, bulldozers and a maze of fresh concrete have taken up the space outside his storefront formerly occupied by bicycles, strollers and tables. The State Highway Administration is in the midst of a $6.2 million effort to improve York Road south of Towson.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. promoted yesterday his successful effort to increase car registration fees in announcing a $9.6 million project to make Harford Road in Parkville safer for pedestrians and friendlier for businesses. Saying the project is the first of many around the state that will be paid for with the new revenues, Ehrlich couched the contentious vote on the fee increase in stark terms: He surrounded himself with dozens of children who attend St. Ursula's, a Catholic school 20 yards from a stretch of Harford Road where officials say speeding is a significant problem.
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