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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff | February 24, 2003
New Frontier For decades, scientists have neglected RNA molecules, assuming that they were little more than messengers carrying genetic instructions from DNA to manufacture the proteins that rule our lives. Now, thanks to a spate of discoveries in recent years, it appears that humble RNA assumes a surprising variety of other forms that do much more than deliver messages. Snippets of RNA actually become enforcers in the cell, interfering with the instructions from certain genes or shutting them down altogether.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 2007
Scientists working independently in Cambridge, England, and Cambridge, Mass., have discovered an unexpected regulatory network that affects the entire immune system. The regulatory network might provide new clues to the working of the body's defenses and the generation of a class of cancers known as lymphomas, which include Hodgkin's disease. The network depends on a genetic element known as a micro-RNA. RNA is the versatile chemical cousin of DNA; the micro snippets are too short to make genes but can interfere with the much longer messenger RNAs, which are transcribed from the DNA and used to direct the synthesis of proteins.
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NEWS
By Earl Lane and Earl Lane,NEWSDAY | November 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - Scientists have shown they can reduce cholesterol levels in mice by shutting off a disease-causing gene with a technique called RNA interference. The RNA approach has been the subject of great hope, and hype, since it was first discovered in studies of roundworms starting in 1998. It ultimately could lead to a drug-like treatment for hereditary disorders such as Huntington's disease by injecting tailored snippets of RNA, DNA'S molecular cousin, to silence a specific gene. The approach also has promise for treating a range of diseases, including heart disease and cancer, that have genetic factors, specialists said.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene and Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2006
For 12-year-old Roger Kornberg, it was just an annoying commotion in the middle of the night. He had been roused from sleep with the news that his father Arthur, a Stanford University professor, had just won the 1959 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Yesterday, it was his turn to wake his father in the middle of the night. Kornberg, like his father a faculty member of the Stanford University School of Medicine, won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. "I was simply stunned; there are no other words," said the 59-year-old scientist of the 2:30 a.m. call from Sweden informing him that he was the sole recipient of the $1.37 million prize.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 2007
Scientists working independently in Cambridge, England, and Cambridge, Mass., have discovered an unexpected regulatory network that affects the entire immune system. The regulatory network might provide new clues to the working of the body's defenses and the generation of a class of cancers known as lymphomas, which include Hodgkin's disease. The network depends on a genetic element known as a micro-RNA. RNA is the versatile chemical cousin of DNA; the micro snippets are too short to make genes but can interfere with the much longer messenger RNAs, which are transcribed from the DNA and used to direct the synthesis of proteins.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 26, 1999
Thomas C. Cech, a Nobel laureate in chemistry from the University of Colorado at Boulder, has been named the next president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase.Cech will assume the post in January, replacing Purnell W. Choppin.Cech, 51, was awarded the Nobel in 1989; he has been a researcher for Hughes for the past decade. A professor of biochemistry, biophysics and genetics, he won the Nobel for discovering that RNA [ribonucleic acid] can act as a catalyst in cell development.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
SAN DIEGO -- Scientists at Scripps Research Institute will announce today that they have discovered a process that can be used to compress 10 million years of molecular evolution into 10 days, thus expediting laboratory experiments.The discovery, reported in today's issue of Science, offers insights into the process of evolution as well as providing possible new tools for genetic engineering, according to experts familiar with the study."This is closer to evolution than what anyone has done before," said Leslie Orgel, a chemist with the Salk Institute.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design new treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2006
One of the most intriguing mysteries of biology is why humans are the only species with a brain smart enough to ponder their own existence. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, believe they have discovered a possible answer: a gene that has undergone powerful mutations in the past 5 million years that may partly account for the accelerated evolution of the human brain. Reporting this week in the online version of the British journal Nature, the scientists said they do not know exactly what the gene does, but that it is active at a key time and place in embryonic development when the brain is growing at its fastest pace.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2006
One of the most intriguing mysteries of biology is why humans are the only species with a brain smart enough to ponder their own existence. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, believe they have discovered a possible answer: a gene that has undergone powerful mutations in the past 5 million years that may partly account for the accelerated evolution of the human brain. Reporting this week in the online version of the British journal Nature, the scientists said they do not know exactly what the gene does, but that it is active at a key time and place in embryonic development when the brain is growing at its fastest pace.
NEWS
By Earl Lane and Earl Lane,NEWSDAY | November 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - Scientists have shown they can reduce cholesterol levels in mice by shutting off a disease-causing gene with a technique called RNA interference. The RNA approach has been the subject of great hope, and hype, since it was first discovered in studies of roundworms starting in 1998. It ultimately could lead to a drug-like treatment for hereditary disorders such as Huntington's disease by injecting tailored snippets of RNA, DNA'S molecular cousin, to silence a specific gene. The approach also has promise for treating a range of diseases, including heart disease and cancer, that have genetic factors, specialists said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff | February 24, 2003
New Frontier For decades, scientists have neglected RNA molecules, assuming that they were little more than messengers carrying genetic instructions from DNA to manufacture the proteins that rule our lives. Now, thanks to a spate of discoveries in recent years, it appears that humble RNA assumes a surprising variety of other forms that do much more than deliver messages. Snippets of RNA actually become enforcers in the cell, interfering with the instructions from certain genes or shutting them down altogether.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 2002
The March of Dimes will award a $250,000 prize tonight to two biologists whose work has helped design new treatments for birth defects and other disorders. Dr. Seymour Benzer, 80, a professor of neuroscience at California Institute of Technology, is considered one of the world's leading biologists. In studies using the fruit fly as a model, Benzer revealed the fundamental mechanisms behind eye development and the genetics of circadian rhythm (the body's "internal clock") and discovered genes that control behavior, learning and memory.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 26, 1999
Thomas C. Cech, a Nobel laureate in chemistry from the University of Colorado at Boulder, has been named the next president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase.Cech will assume the post in January, replacing Purnell W. Choppin.Cech, 51, was awarded the Nobel in 1989; he has been a researcher for Hughes for the past decade. A professor of biochemistry, biophysics and genetics, he won the Nobel for discovering that RNA [ribonucleic acid] can act as a catalyst in cell development.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene and Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2006
For 12-year-old Roger Kornberg, it was just an annoying commotion in the middle of the night. He had been roused from sleep with the news that his father Arthur, a Stanford University professor, had just won the 1959 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Yesterday, it was his turn to wake his father in the middle of the night. Kornberg, like his father a faculty member of the Stanford University School of Medicine, won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. "I was simply stunned; there are no other words," said the 59-year-old scientist of the 2:30 a.m. call from Sweden informing him that he was the sole recipient of the $1.37 million prize.
HEALTH
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,New York Times Syndicate | October 2, 1990
Even for those of us in excellent shape, it's common for muscles to feel sore the day after a hard workout. And although taking aspirin may relieve your pains temporarily, it also can delay your recovery.When your muscles feel sore, the best treatment is to take the day off. Don't even stretch.The soreness you feel is caused by bleeding into and damage to the microscopic fibers of your muscles. Exercising with damaged muscles can cause a larger, more serious muscle tear. Then you won't be able to exercise at all.If you are unable -- or unwilling -- to take the day off, you should exercise at a relaxed pace in another sport that stresses muscles other than the ones that feel sore.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
SAN DIEGO -- Scientists at Scripps Research Institute will announce today that they have discovered a process that can be used to compress 10 million years of molecular evolution into 10 days, thus expediting laboratory experiments.The discovery, reported in today's issue of Science, offers insights into the process of evolution as well as providing possible new tools for genetic engineering, according to experts familiar with the study."This is closer to evolution than what anyone has done before," said Leslie Orgel, a chemist with the Salk Institute.
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