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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
The Maryland Science Center is fighting an attempt to sink its upcoming blockbuster exhibit on the Titanic. The Inner Harbor museum has sued a New York-based company that has exclusive rights to recover items from the wreck of the ill-fated passenger liner, seeking to force the company to live up to what it described as an agreement to provide artifacts and other support for "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery." The suit follows a demand last month by the company, RMS Titanic Inc., that the science center stop developing and marketing the $2.3 million exhibit, which is scheduled to open in November and run for several months, court papers say. The exhibit is expected to generate about a quarter of the museum's annual revenues.
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EXPLORE
April 18, 2012
An article in the April 20, 1912, edition of The Argus reported a Catonsville resident's cause for concern on board a sister ship to the doomed RMS Titanic. While not on the doomed ship Titanic, a Catonsvilleian on the Olympic went through much of the excitement. He is William G. Scarlett of Bloomsbury avenue, who went abroad for a rest. A short time ago, three members of his family were ill with typhoid, and Mr. Scarlett felt the need of change and recreation.
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NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 17, 1997
It has been 84 years since more than 1,500 lives were lost in the icy waters of the North Atlantic.But today, the doomed Titanic remains unsinkable - as a metaphor, a conversational gambit and as fodder for authors, producers, Web-site wonks and scavengers hawking grim souvenirs of that long-ago nightmare.Lately, publishers have launched a fresh flotilla of novels and nonfiction about the tragic ship, deemed the epitome of seaborne luxury and safety until it barreled into an iceberg on the night of April 14, 1912, and sank early the next morning.
NEWS
By Paul McCardell | April 14, 2012
RMS Titanic hit an iceberg 100 years ago today and sank at 2:20 a.m. (West Greenland Time Zone) on April 15. It was a clear cold night. According to Weatherwise Magazine and media reports, many factors may have contributed to the disaster, including the mild winter, the glassy calm seas, the moonless night and the closest approach by the moon in 1,400 years on Jan. 4, 1912, which would have caused the sea to rise and many more icebergs to break off...
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
An exhibit on the Titanic scheduled to open next month at the Maryland Science Center has been pushed back to February while the museum fights to include photography and artifacts controlled by the New York company that owns salvage rights to one of the world's most famous shipwrecks. The dispute has cost the Inner Harbor museum, which estimates it will lose about $560,000 because of the three-month delay, according to court papers filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The museum could lose much more, though, if it fails in its court battle to force RMS Titanic Inc. to live up to an agreement to provide items from the ship and other support for "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery."
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Over the next two weeks, Mark Lach will make sure a cherub that once adorned the doomed ship Titanic is displayed just right in a grand staircase that soon will grace the Maryland Science Center's exhibit floor. He'll be certain to showcase a door that once hung on the ship's D-deck through which only first-class passengers had been permitted and a child's marble, which was found decades later on the cold, ocean floor. Those who attend Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, when it comes to the Maryland Science Center next month will also be able to visit a memorial room to see a list of which of the 2,228 passengers perished after the vessel hit an iceberg in the Atlantic on April 15, 1912.
NEWS
By Marc Davis and Marc Davis,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 21, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - On a bitterly cold night in 1912, lookout Frederick Fleet was perched in the crow's nest of RMS Titanic when he saw - too late - an iceberg dead ahead. For several crucial minutes he had missed the massive berg because the sea was calm, producing no tell-tale waves, and there was no moonlight. Fleet banged the crow's nest bell three times, then frantically called the bridge. "Are you there?" he cried. "Yes, what did you see?" a voice calmly replied. "Iceberg right ahead," Fleet reported.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Artifacts recovered from the Titanic will be included in a Maryland Science Center exhibit on the famous shipwreck as part of a legal settlement between the museum and the New York company that owns salvage rights to the ship. Science center officials called the agreement - expected to be made final this week - a "win-win" situation after a five-month federal court battle. The exhibit, "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery," is scheduled to open in early spring and is expected to generate $1.5 million to $2 million for the Inner Harbor museum.
NEWS
By Paul McCardell | April 14, 2012
RMS Titanic hit an iceberg 100 years ago today and sank at 2:20 a.m. (West Greenland Time Zone) on April 15. It was a clear cold night. According to Weatherwise Magazine and media reports, many factors may have contributed to the disaster, including the mild winter, the glassy calm seas, the moonless night and the closest approach by the moon in 1,400 years on Jan. 4, 1912, which would have caused the sea to rise and many more icebergs to break off...
NEWS
January 23, 1997
Edith Haisman,100, the oldest survivor of the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, died Monday at a nursing home in Southampton, England, 80 miles southwest of London, her family said.Mrs. Haisman remembered seeing her father, Thomas Brown, standing on the deck of the sinking ocean liner the night of April 14, with a glass of brandy and a cigar. He waved and said: "I will see you in New York."The Titanic, then the world's largest liner, sank with 1,500 people aboard. Lifeboats got away with about 700 crew and passengers as the vessel broke up and sank 560 miles off Newfoundland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
There is nothing more evocative than looking at or touching an object from, or meeting someone associated with, a dramatic historical event. Simply said, it puts you there. And that has been my good fortune throughout my life when it came to people and things associated with the RMS Titanic, which sank April 15, 1912, on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York, after colliding with an iceberg off the Grand Banks. My first encounter with the Titanic came on Christmas morning in 1955, when my mother gave my father a copy of the recently published "A Night to Remember," by Baltimore-born and -raised author Walter Lord, whom I would get to know years later.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Over the next two weeks, Mark Lach will make sure a cherub that once adorned the doomed ship Titanic is displayed just right in a grand staircase that soon will grace the Maryland Science Center's exhibit floor. He'll be certain to showcase a door that once hung on the ship's D-deck through which only first-class passengers had been permitted and a child's marble, which was found decades later on the cold, ocean floor. Those who attend Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, when it comes to the Maryland Science Center next month will also be able to visit a memorial room to see a list of which of the 2,228 passengers perished after the vessel hit an iceberg in the Atlantic on April 15, 1912.
NEWS
By Marc Davis and Marc Davis,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 21, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - On a bitterly cold night in 1912, lookout Frederick Fleet was perched in the crow's nest of RMS Titanic when he saw - too late - an iceberg dead ahead. For several crucial minutes he had missed the massive berg because the sea was calm, producing no tell-tale waves, and there was no moonlight. Fleet banged the crow's nest bell three times, then frantically called the bridge. "Are you there?" he cried. "Yes, what did you see?" a voice calmly replied. "Iceberg right ahead," Fleet reported.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Artifacts recovered from the Titanic will be included in a Maryland Science Center exhibit on the famous shipwreck as part of a legal settlement between the museum and the New York company that owns salvage rights to the ship. Science center officials called the agreement - expected to be made final this week - a "win-win" situation after a five-month federal court battle. The exhibit, "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery," is scheduled to open in early spring and is expected to generate $1.5 million to $2 million for the Inner Harbor museum.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
An exhibit on the Titanic scheduled to open next month at the Maryland Science Center has been pushed back to February while the museum fights to include photography and artifacts controlled by the New York company that owns salvage rights to one of the world's most famous shipwrecks. The dispute has cost the Inner Harbor museum, which estimates it will lose about $560,000 because of the three-month delay, according to court papers filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The museum could lose much more, though, if it fails in its court battle to force RMS Titanic Inc. to live up to an agreement to provide items from the ship and other support for "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
The Maryland Science Center is fighting an attempt to sink its upcoming blockbuster exhibit on the Titanic. The Inner Harbor museum has sued a New York-based company that has exclusive rights to recover items from the wreck of the ill-fated passenger liner, seeking to force the company to live up to what it described as an agreement to provide artifacts and other support for "Titanic Science: Depths of Discovery." The suit follows a demand last month by the company, RMS Titanic Inc., that the science center stop developing and marketing the $2.3 million exhibit, which is scheduled to open in November and run for several months, court papers say. The exhibit is expected to generate about a quarter of the museum's annual revenues.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
Tom Dettweiler will spend the next nine days floating more than two miles above the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which lies at the bottom of the cold North Atlantic.His mission is to make sure an army of cameramen, editors and producers is able to gather new footage deep inside the hull of the wreck, which sank with more than 1,500 on board after it rammed an iceberg in the darkness of April 14, 1912.Dettweiler said in an interview before embarking that the Titanic project, if successful, will break ground for ocean exploration.
EXPLORE
April 18, 2012
An article in the April 20, 1912, edition of The Argus reported a Catonsville resident's cause for concern on board a sister ship to the doomed RMS Titanic. While not on the doomed ship Titanic, a Catonsvilleian on the Olympic went through much of the excitement. He is William G. Scarlett of Bloomsbury avenue, who went abroad for a rest. A short time ago, three members of his family were ill with typhoid, and Mr. Scarlett felt the need of change and recreation.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
Tom Dettweiler will spend the next nine days floating more than two miles above the wreckage of the RMS Titanic, which lies at the bottom of the cold North Atlantic.His mission is to make sure an army of cameramen, editors and producers is able to gather new footage deep inside the hull of the wreck, which sank with more than 1,500 on board after it rammed an iceberg in the darkness of April 14, 1912.Dettweiler said in an interview before embarking that the Titanic project, if successful, will break ground for ocean exploration.
NEWS
January 23, 1997
Edith Haisman,100, the oldest survivor of the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, died Monday at a nursing home in Southampton, England, 80 miles southwest of London, her family said.Mrs. Haisman remembered seeing her father, Thomas Brown, standing on the deck of the sinking ocean liner the night of April 14, with a glass of brandy and a cigar. He waved and said: "I will see you in New York."The Titanic, then the world's largest liner, sank with 1,500 people aboard. Lifeboats got away with about 700 crew and passengers as the vessel broke up and sank 560 miles off Newfoundland.
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