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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 4, 2003
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - The militants who bombed a Riyadh housing complex on Nov. 8 had enough military-grade high explosives to make 132 more car bombs of the same size, according to information released yesterday by Saudi officials. A raid last week on a house believed to have been used by the bombers turned up 84,480 pounds of a material known as RDX and 3,000 pounds of an unidentified explosive, the Saudi Press Agency reported. RDX is a high-quality military explosive used in bombs and torpedoes.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 2010
The Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins Medicine said Tuesday that it will partner with the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on research, education and patient care. Together, the two internationally renowned institutions hope to cure blinding illnesses, such as diabetic eye disease. They say they will train the next generation of leaders in ophthalmology. And with financial backing from the Saudi government, Wilmer faculty will work in Riyadh. At Hopkins, there will be a new endowed professorship to support the faculty.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - The United States has intercepted communications strongly suggesting a small cell of leaders of al-Qaida in Iran directed last week's terrorist attacks in Saudi Arabia, and the United States is sending a strong protest to the Tehran government, said senior Bush administration officials. The United States has asked Lakdar Brahimi, a senior U.N. official, to convey to Iranian officials at a meeting in Geneva today "our deep, deep concern that individuals associated with al-Qaida have planned and directed the attack in Saudi Arabia from inside Iran," an administration official said.
FEATURES
By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,Los Angeles Times | October 25, 2006
Laura Poitras' great documentary My Country, My Country, which airs at 9 tonight on PBS after a limited theatrical release this year, is, ostensibly, about an Iraqi physician, a minority Sunni, running for political office amid the isolation, fear and destruction in Baghdad, Iraq, ahead of the 2005 national elections. However Poitras found Dr. Riyadh (his first name is not given) and his family and then gained the intimacy required to document their life, morning, noon and night, they provide a sharp prism into "ordinary" middle-class life in Baghdad -- the new normality of explosions outside and breakfast without electricity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Saudi Arabia has arrested a senior figure in al-Qaida who is believed to have played a crucial role in planning and carrying out the May bombings in Riyadh that killed 34 people, including eight Americans. The man was thought to be planning further operations against U.S. targets, senior American and Saudi officials said yesterday. The arrest of the suspect, Ali Abd al-Rahman al-Faqasi al-Ghamdi, also known as Abu Bakr al-Azdi, was described by the officials as a major step.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2003
CAIRO, Egypt - A British defense worker was shot and killed yesterday in Saudi Arabia's capital, Riyadh, in the latest of a series of attacks on Westerners in Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries. The man, an employee of the British defense firm BAE Systems, died after a gunman opened fire at 4:45 p.m. as the victim waited in his car at a traffic light in the capital's Grenada neighborhood. The police chased and quickly arrested a man, identified as Saud bin Ali bin Nasser, according to the official Saudi Press Agency, which cited Ministry of Interior officials.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - After a shootout in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, and the discovery of a major arms cache there, Saudi authorities are pursuing 19 Islamic militants with ties to al-Qaida who now appear to have been planning a substantial terrorist attack, Saudi and U.S. officials said yesterday. In an indication of how seriously the threat is being taken in Saudi Arabia, the Saudi government has been unusually open in discussing it, even making public the names and photographs of the wanted men in the country's newspapers and television broadcasts this week.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - The 27 pages deleted from a congressional report on the Sept. 11 attacks depict a Saudi government that not only provided significant money and aid to the suicide hijackers but also allowed potentially hundreds of millions of dollars to flow to al-Qaida and other terrorist groups through suspect charities and other fronts, according to sources familiar with the document. One U.S. official who has read the classified section said it describes "direct involvement of senior [Saudi]
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 10, 2003
CAIRO, Egypt - Saudi and U.S. authorities blamed al-Qaida yesterday for the car bombing at a residential compound in Riyadh on Saturday night that killed 17 people, including five children, and injured 122. The attack left the Saudi regime digging out from the second major suicide bombing in the capital in the past six months and facing the reality that al-Qaida appears to have survived a tough crackdown. The bombing Saturday struck a complex of villas on the capital's western edge that housed mostly foreign Arab workers, authorities said, and most of the victims were Lebanese, Egyptian and Sudanese.
NEWS
By Greg Miller, Josh Meyer and Robin Wright and Greg Miller, Josh Meyer and Robin Wright,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Four successive explosions rattled the Saudi capital of Riyadh late yesterday in what appeared to be coordinated attacks on compounds known to house large numbers of Americans and other Westerners, U.S. officials said. Numerous casualties and at least three deaths were reported in the attacks, which came on the eve of a planned visit to Saudi Arabia by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell. U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Robert Jordan said, "We have unconfirmed reports of a couple of American deaths, but we do not have confirmation on those at this time."
NEWS
August 3, 2005
ASSESSING U.S.-Saudi relations following the death of King Fahd requires us to return to Crawford, Texas, and the April visit of then Crown Prince Abdullah. The meeting between the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia and President Bush reaffirmed the close relationship of the two countries and set the parameters for their dealings on all the key topics - oil, terrorism, Middle East peace and political reform. The commitments reached then are a good indication of what matters to the now King Abdullah and the course he will pursue as successor to his half-brother.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - A suspected member of al-Qaida who prosecutors say once talked with Ahmed Omar Abu Ali about assassinating President Bush was killed by Saudi authorities in a shootout 17 months ago, the Justice Department disclosed yesterday. The disclosure that a potential witness in the case is dead could complicate the prosecution of Abu Ali on terrorism charges in an indictment against him that was unsealed Tuesday in Virginia. It came as prosecutors called Abu Ali a danger to society and urged that he be held without bail.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2004
CAIRO, Egypt - Saudi police made the grisly discovery in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, of the frozen head of Paul M. Johnson Jr., the American hostage decapitated by his captors last month, the Interior Ministry announced yesterday. The head was found during a raid on the suspected hideout of Saleh al-Awfi, the reputed leader of al-Qaida on the Arabian Peninsula, the main franchise in the kingdom of Osama bin Laden's group. The raid led to a gun battle with militants inside the house in which two men were killed, including the editor of the group's Web magazine, Sawt al-Jihad, or Voice of the Holy War, who was on the list of the kingdom's 26 most wanted militants, security officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 2004
CAIRO, Egypt - An American military contractor was fatally shot yesterdayin Riyadh, Saudi Arabia's capital, the latest in a string of killings through which al-Qaida or its sympathizers seem determined to try to drive foreigners from the kingdom. The contractor, who had worked for Vinnell Arabia for several years training the Saudi National Guard, was found dead in his apartment by another employee who came to visit, said Jay McCaffrey, a spokesman for the company, which is based in Fairfax, Va. The victim, Robert C. Jacobs, 62, of Murphysboro, Ill., had worked for Vinnell for seven years, most of it in Saudi Arabia, said another company official, Janis Lamar.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2004
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - The leading cleric in this ultraconservative Muslim kingdom rained contempt and threats of hellfire yesterday upon the shadowy bands of radicals who are waging a war against the government in the name of Islam. One day after a car bomb at a police headquarters in the heart of this capital killed at least five people and injured 148, Sheik Abdul Aziz bin Abdullah al Sheik said the bombers would "rot in hell." The brazenness of the attack - an attempt to blow up a government office full of Saudis - has stunned people here.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2004
CAIRO, Egypt - A huge suicide car bomb tore through a Saudi police headquarters in Riyadh yesterday, killing at least four people, wounding 148 and turning the wrath of Islamist militants directly against the Saudi government. The attack apparently signaled a radical new tactic in the string of suicide bombings and shootouts waged by militants against the oil-rich kingdom this past year. It was the most brazen strike yet, designed to kill scores of Saudis in the heart of the capital on a bustling workday.
NEWS
By David Kelly, Tracy Wilkinson and Sebastian Rotella and David Kelly, Tracy Wilkinson and Sebastian Rotella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2003
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi security forces have arrested four men they say are affiliated with the al-Qaida terror network in connection with last week's deadly bomb attacks here, officials said yesterday. The attacks, launched simultaneously May 12 on three residential compounds, killed at least 34 people, including eight Americans and nine attackers. The arrests were announced at a news conference in Riyadh by Prince Nayif ibn Abdulaziz, the Saudi interior minister. Prince Nayif said the four men did not take part in carrying out the attacks but knew about the plot and were sympathizers of the assailants.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010
The Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins Medicine said Tuesday that it will partner with the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on research, education and patient care. Together, the two internationally renowned institutions hope to cure blinding illnesses, such as diabetic eye disease. They say they will train the next generation of leaders in ophthalmology. And with financial backing from the Saudi government, Wilmer faculty will work in Riyadh. At Hopkins, there will be a new endowed professorship to support the faculty.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 4, 2003
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - The militants who bombed a Riyadh housing complex on Nov. 8 had enough military-grade high explosives to make 132 more car bombs of the same size, according to information released yesterday by Saudi officials. A raid last week on a house believed to have been used by the bombers turned up 84,480 pounds of a material known as RDX and 3,000 pounds of an unidentified explosive, the Saudi Press Agency reported. RDX is a high-quality military explosive used in bombs and torpedoes.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 2003
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - The two suicide bombers who carried out an attack that killed 18 people at a Riyadh residential compound last month were wanted by Saudi authorities but didn't have an extensive record of militant activities, Saudi officials and U.S. terrorism experts said yesterday. Saudi authorities said they have learned the identities of those who plotted the Nov. 8 attack but didn't release the names. A hunt is under way for the ringleaders, officials said. Releasing the first details of their investigation into the bombing, Interior Ministry officials said they used DNA samples to identify the two bombers as Ali bin Hamid Elmabady Alharbi and Nasser bin Abdullah bin Nasser Alsiary.
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