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By Judith Green | June 19, 1997
In Irish step-dancing, the feet do all the work while the body and arms remain still and uninvolved. But if you think that's all there is to it, you need to see "Riverdance," a dazzling display of precision step-dancing that exploded on Broadway last year and is now on a national tour.The "Riverdance" company performs for two weeks, Wednesday through July 6, at Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts in northern Virginia. (Take the Capital Beltway, I-495, to the Dulles Toll Road, then take the Wolf Trap exit.
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By Carolyn Kelemen | March 9, 2012
These are heady times for performer Joe Duffey, who spent his formative years at Columbia's Teelin School of Irish Dance getting ready for a career that materialized right on cue. As a dancer, choreographer and assistant director of the Teelin Dance Company, the 20-year-old reigns supreme in the world of hoofing or what he calls, "Irish dance flavored with a lot more percussion and a bit of edginess. " Last month Duffey joined Teelin's founding director Maureen Gately on stage for the world premiere of "Stepdance" at the Weinberg Theater in Frederick.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1997
VIENNA, Va. -- "Riverdance," the wildly popular Irish step-dancing show, purports to be a history of Ireland through dance and song. But forget all its pretensions, and the sooner the better. It's a dance spectacular, pure and simple.And who could object to a stage full of lissome girls in skimpy skirts and handsome guys in leather pants, lightly jigging or boldly stomping their way through intricate dance routines?In between the dances are some truly drippy quasi-poems (by one Theo Dorgan)
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 2006
The way Libby Green sees it, the recent history of Irish dancing can be divided into two distinct eras: pre-Riverdance and post-Riverdance. "Shortly after Riverdance premiered, the Baltimore area had two Irish dance schools. Now, there are about 10," said Green, a Harford resident and former administrator for the Ryan School of Irish Dance in Bel Air. Not only has the interest in Irish dancing surged in the decade since the popular theatrical show debuted 10 years ago, but demand for practitioners near St. Patrick's Day has shot up as well, say local dancers and instructors.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 3, 1998
They could be called "The Riverdance Rockettes" -- more than two dozen Irish dancers precision step-dancing, their arms kept tightly to their sides, their legs flying in perfect unison.That sight is one of the most memorable and remarkable aspects of "River-dance," the thrilling international sensation now at the Lyric Opera House.But the synchronized dancing isn't the show's only marvel. The two lead Irish dancers -- Niamh Roddy and Michael Patrick Gallagher -- are marvels in their own right.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 29, 1998
Riverdance" seems to have been around forever - especially in public television fund-raisers.In fact, the hit show is only 4 years old, and Tuesday's opening at the Lyric Opera House will mark its first-ever visit to Baltimore - reason enough to provide a primer on the Irish dance extravaganza.First, however, a few words on the show's megahit status.Kevin McCormack, dance captain of the company coming to the Lyric, has been with "Riverdance" since its earliest incarnation in 1994. He admits its success took him somewhat by surprise.
FEATURES
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | May 27, 1997
Michael Flatley wants to set the record straight. He has never been, nor ever claimed to be, a computer-carrying member of Mensa, the club for modest folks with staggering IQs. In fact, he doesn't know how that particular myth got started and seems to think you have to be an idiot to believe such blarney."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | March 5, 2000
Nothing like a little food and drink after working off a few calories on the dance floor -- especially if that floor is the Lyric Opera House stage and the dance is the high-flying footwork of "Riverdance" That's exactly what greeted many of the "Riverdance" performers and guests at a reception after a benefit performance for the House with a Heart Foundation. Among the devoted fans mingling in the mezzanine: Lou Grasmick, founder of House with a Heart Foundation; Bob Miller, foundation board chair; Larry DeBaugh, Gary Dorsch, Ruth Heltne-Carlin, Jody Landers, Karen Nardone, Jim O'Conor and Cindy Wick, board members; Natalie Chabot, House with a Heart executive director; Tricia Slawinski, manager of governmental affairs for the Port of Baltimore; Pat Mitchell, IBM vice president; Marty Green, retired CEO of Stackhouse Inc.; Mike Neal, associate with Booz-Allen & Hamilton; Mac Barrett, vice president with McCormick & Co.; Dr. Hans Wilhelmsen, Baltimore plastic surgeon; and Lorna Imperial, a nurse at Good Samaritan Hospital.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 2006
The way Libby Green sees it, the recent history of Irish dancing can be divided into two distinct eras: pre-Riverdance and post-Riverdance. "Shortly after Riverdance premiered, the Baltimore area had two Irish dance schools. Now, there are about 10," said Green, a Harford resident and former administrator for the Ryan School of Irish Dance in Bel Air. Not only has the interest in Irish dancing surged in the decade since the popular theatrical show debuted 10 years ago, but demand for practitioners near St. Patrick's Day has shot up as well, say local dancers and instructors.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2003
For Baltimore native and aspiring singer Amy Carrick, a little "luck of the Irish" has gone a long way. Just three short years ago, Carrick was working 80-hour weeks, teaching ballet, nannying and waiting tables in an Irish pub in Nashville. Now, she is taking what could be a first step toward international fame, departing for Belarus to compete in the prestigious Straviansky Bazaar vocal competition. A competition held annually for more than 15 years, its contestants include both vocal performers and composers.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
Common Ground on the Hill will present a monthly Saturday concert series at the Carroll Arts Center in Westminster. All shows will begin at 8 p.m. and cost $15, $13 for those age 65 and older and $10 for children younger than age 12 and students with identification. A five-concert series subscription costs $65, $60 for senior citizens and $45 for children and students. Scheduled programs are: The Tony Trischka Band on Nov. 1: From New York, this eclectic band will deliver a sound drawing on bluegrass, jazz, rock and classical.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2003
For Baltimore native and aspiring singer Amy Carrick, a little "luck of the Irish" has gone a long way. Just three short years ago, Carrick was working 80-hour weeks, teaching ballet, nannying and waiting tables in an Irish pub in Nashville. Now, she is taking what could be a first step toward international fame, departing for Belarus to compete in the prestigious Straviansky Bazaar vocal competition. A competition held annually for more than 15 years, its contestants include both vocal performers and composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | March 5, 2000
Nothing like a little food and drink after working off a few calories on the dance floor -- especially if that floor is the Lyric Opera House stage and the dance is the high-flying footwork of "Riverdance" That's exactly what greeted many of the "Riverdance" performers and guests at a reception after a benefit performance for the House with a Heart Foundation. Among the devoted fans mingling in the mezzanine: Lou Grasmick, founder of House with a Heart Foundation; Bob Miller, foundation board chair; Larry DeBaugh, Gary Dorsch, Ruth Heltne-Carlin, Jody Landers, Karen Nardone, Jim O'Conor and Cindy Wick, board members; Natalie Chabot, House with a Heart executive director; Tricia Slawinski, manager of governmental affairs for the Port of Baltimore; Pat Mitchell, IBM vice president; Marty Green, retired CEO of Stackhouse Inc.; Mike Neal, associate with Booz-Allen & Hamilton; Mac Barrett, vice president with McCormick & Co.; Dr. Hans Wilhelmsen, Baltimore plastic surgeon; and Lorna Imperial, a nurse at Good Samaritan Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Keys | February 10, 2000
Hawaiian celebration Chase away the winter blahs by joining the Hula School for a Valentine's "uniki" 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Saturday at the Columbian Center, 335 N. Ritchie Highway, Severna Park. Uniki means graduation, and members of the public are invited to watch as the school's latest batch of graduates performs ancient and modern dances of Hawaii, Tahiti, New Zealand and Samoa. Audience members also will have the opportunity to dance to the music of Lava the DJ and to purchase food, island gifts and Valentine's items.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | October 31, 1999
For a theatrical production concerned with ancient Native American traditions and values, "Spirit: A Journey in Dance, Drums and Song" has a thoroughly up-to-date ancestry that includes equal parts "RiverDance" and public television pledge drives. For "Spirit," which opens a six-day run at the Lyric Opera House Tuesday, it's a fitting pedigree. The musical production marries Broadway flash and dazzle to music and images from Native American culture to tell the story of a man who finds his way out of the madness of everyday modern life by embracing lessons of the past.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 3, 1998
They could be called "The Riverdance Rockettes" -- more than two dozen Irish dancers precision step-dancing, their arms kept tightly to their sides, their legs flying in perfect unison.That sight is one of the most memorable and remarkable aspects of "River-dance," the thrilling international sensation now at the Lyric Opera House.But the synchronized dancing isn't the show's only marvel. The two lead Irish dancers -- Niamh Roddy and Michael Patrick Gallagher -- are marvels in their own right.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
Common Ground on the Hill will present a monthly Saturday concert series at the Carroll Arts Center in Westminster. All shows will begin at 8 p.m. and cost $15, $13 for those age 65 and older and $10 for children younger than age 12 and students with identification. A five-concert series subscription costs $65, $60 for senior citizens and $45 for children and students. Scheduled programs are: The Tony Trischka Band on Nov. 1: From New York, this eclectic band will deliver a sound drawing on bluegrass, jazz, rock and classical.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
Rhythm is everywhere, especially when Footworks is in town.Those in the percussive dance troupe from Annapolis use their hands, feet, shoes and even empty water bottles to tap out rhythms from the Appalachian Mountains to South Africa.Tomorrow night, they'll be stomping, clapping, clomping and clickety-clacking at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts for a one-night performance."It's a wonderful percussive dance ensemble," said Carol Treiber, executive director of the Cultural Arts Foundation of Anne Arundel County.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 29, 1998
Riverdance" seems to have been around forever - especially in public television fund-raisers.In fact, the hit show is only 4 years old, and Tuesday's opening at the Lyric Opera House will mark its first-ever visit to Baltimore - reason enough to provide a primer on the Irish dance extravaganza.First, however, a few words on the show's megahit status.Kevin McCormack, dance captain of the company coming to the Lyric, has been with "Riverdance" since its earliest incarnation in 1994. He admits its success took him somewhat by surprise.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 1998
Not that it matters to anyone but purists in these days of amplified everything, but the thunder of tapping feet you'll hear at "Riverdance" (Dec. 1-20, Lyric Opera House) and "Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance" (May 4-9, Lyric Opera House) does not come entirely from the dancers. It doesn't even come from the microphones.According to a recent item in the Periscope section of Newsweek, the producers of "River- dance" finally have admitted that the taps are augmented by prerecorded sound.
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