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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
Martin Marietta Corp. began the process yesterday of eliminating about 200 jobs at its Middle River plant by the end of the month, and the company warned that there will be additional layoffs in the months ahead.Yesterday's layoff notices are part of a previously announced restructuring aimed at adjusting to a decline in business activity and boosting the plant's chances of survival after Martin's merger with Lockheed Corp. Some jobs will be eliminated through attrition and early retirements.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The state Board of Public Works approved Wednesday a $126 million grant to Baltimore toward upgrading the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant — part of a $686 million state and local project to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. The upgrade in technology at the city-owned plant in Baltimore County, which serves an estimated 1.3 million people in the region, is expected to reduce nitrogen pollution from the plant...
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | October 25, 1990
It's an odor-eater that will cost Baltimore $1.8 million. But neighbors of the city's Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant probably will think it's well worth the money.Residents near the Back River plant in eastern Baltimore County have long complained about the stench from the thousands of tons of raw sewage processed there. When Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke took office in 1987, he pledged to try to clear the air.Yesterday, the city's Board of Estimates awarded a $1.8 million contract to contain and clean the foul-smelling air emanating from one part of the plant.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
An array of solar panels, spreading across nearly five acres at the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in Essex, could deliver significant energy savings and will pay for itself within a decade, officials said Tuesday. The 4,200 American-made panels, installed in the past three months at a cost of about $4 million, have begun to supply about 5 percent of the energy — up to 1,000 kilowatts per hour — needed to run the plant on Eastern Avenue. The plant serves about 1.3 million residents in the city and Baltimore County and can treat 180 million gallons of sewage a day. It uses the methane byproduct from its treatment process to produce about 20 percent of the power for its equipment.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 2, 1993
Although spared from annihilation in Thursday's corporate consolidation, Martin Marietta Corp.'s sprawling Middle River complex had been one of many plants on a list slated for closure early last month.And despite the efforts of federal, state and county officials, who joined with the head of the local division to persuade executives to spare the plant, the future of the facility and its 1,600 workers remains in doubt.The fate of the Baltimore County complex is "still very much in question," Mark L. Wasserman, secretary of the Department of Economic and Employment Development, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
The historic Lockheed Martin aviation plant in Middle River, which company officials have touted as a dramatic comeback story, is suddenly back on the block as the aerospace giant appears poised to sell the factory to General Electric Co.The plant, which primarily makes jet engine thrust reversers, is part of a transaction that could allow Lockheed Martin to reacquire a chunk of stock now controlled by GE, sources said yesterday.GE got the stock in 1993, when the old Martin Marietta Corp.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
More than 300 union employees at Middle River Aircraft Systems ratified a four-year contract with management yesterday by a substantial margin, avoiding a strike that was set to begin after midnight tonight. The vote ended a tense standoff between workers and management that began after the same contract offer was narrowly rejected by members of United Auto Workers Local 738 on Oct. 30. That vote began a 10-day cooling off period before the union could walk off the job. The union's leadership declined to comment on yesterday's vote, which was 183 -138 in favor of accepting the agreement.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
Weather-Tite Manufacturing Co., which made viny replacement windows for the past four years in Middle River, will close its plant in mid-February, eliminating 85 jobs.The Philadelphia-based company is closing the local plant to consolidate its operations in a new 125,000-square-foot building in Bensalem, Pa., outside of Philadelphia, said Steve Short, operations manager for the Middle River plant.The local operation's 85-member work force has been reduced to 38 since the fall, Mr. Short said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
These are uneasy times for workers at Martin Marietta Corp.'s Middle River plant.The company said yesterday that it expects to lay off some workers, probably fewer than 100, in coming weeks, followed by more layoffs next year. Martin blamed a decline in commercial aircraft orders.News of the layoffs come as workers are already nervous about the impact of the proposed merger between Martin Marietta and Lockheed Corp., a consolidation that some fear could mean the final chapter in the Middle River plant's storied 65-year history.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
The Navy awarded Martin Marietta Corp.'s plant in Middle River a contract valued at $298 million yesterday for the production of rocket launchers used on ships.The contract for the manufacture of vertical launching systems, or VLS as they are commonly called by workers at the Baltimore County plant, "represents a very big chunk of business," said spokesman Donald Carson. "It's very good news."VLS is a cluster of canisters that fit below deck on ships. They store and launch a variety of missiles against aircraft, submarines or land-based targets.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
With the push of a button, Baltimore set a course yesterday to save up to $2.4 million by using waste to treat waste. Until yesterday morning, gas - mostly methane - produced at the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in East Baltimore was vented and burned in 20-foot flares that could be seen miles away. Now those flames have been extinguished.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
More than 300 union employees at Middle River Aircraft Systems ratified a four-year contract with management yesterday by a substantial margin, avoiding a strike that was set to begin after midnight tonight. The vote ended a tense standoff between workers and management that began after the same contract offer was narrowly rejected by members of United Auto Workers Local 738 on Oct. 30. That vote began a 10-day cooling off period before the union could walk off the job. The union's leadership declined to comment on yesterday's vote, which was 183 -138 in favor of accepting the agreement.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2004
CENTREVILLE - State environmental officials, probing allegations that millions of gallons of raw sewage were routinely dumped from an aging treatment plant here into a tributary of the Chester River, say recent water quality tests have ruled out any immediate health hazard. Samples taken from the Corsica River during the past two weeks by the Maryland Department of the Environment show that the 45-year-old facility continues to release unacceptable levels of phosphorus and nitrogen, nutrients linked to the decline of the bay. Other pollutants, such as fecal coliform, a bacteria found in human or animal waste, were within acceptable levels, said Jeffrey R. Welsh, MDE's communications director.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
The Pentagon announced a $16 billion deal to lease aerial refueling planes from Boeing Co. yesterday, a controversial arrangement that will go far to prop up the aircraft maker's sagging assembly lines but which critics fear will set a new standard for government-backed corporate bailouts. A $4 billion purchase option would, if exercised, make it a $20 billion deal. The arrangement calls for Boeing to build 100 airplanes in the same Everett, Wash., plant that builds Boeing 767 passenger jets, and then to transfer the aircraft to Wichita, Kan., for conversion into newly designed KC-767 refueling tankers.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Marine Systems unit in Middle River was awarded a $142 million contract yesterday to build missile launchers for the U.S. Navy and foreign navies, ensuring that the plant's main production line will stay open at least into 2007. The value could approach $323 million, with work continuing through 2009, if the federal government exercises two options. The award, which was expected, ensures a future for Lockheed Martin's MK 41 Vertical Launching System, the premier product built at the company's plant on Eastern Boulevard, which has 600 employees.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2002
The Navy went with experience when it selected a Northrop Grumman Corp. unit in Sunnyvale, Calif., over Lockheed Martin Corp.'s division in Middle River to produce a system for firing Tomahawk cruise missiles from submarines. Northrop Grumman Marine Systems was awarded a $16.6 million contract late Tuesday for the design, fabrication and testing of the system, edging out Lockheed Martin's Marine Systems unit in Baltimore County. Lockheed Martin has been building missile launchers at Middle River for more than 20 years, but its MK-41 launchers are designed to fire a wide variety of missiles from surface ships, not submarines.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 8, 1994
Martin Marietta Corp.'s Middle River complex came dangerously close last month to being phased out -- a lot closer than most people, including many of its 1,400 workers, realized.But quick action by government officials -- and a local Martin executive -- helped save the complex, which once built the famed China Clipper. This was an occasion when Gov. William Donald Schaefer's aggressive "do it now" philosophy paid off.As part of a consolidation triggered by its acquisition last year of General Electric Co.'s aerospace division, Martin was closing a number of plants.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1991
In a deal city officials say will solve Baltimore's sludge problems for years, the Board of Estimates has agreed to pay two firms about $320 million to convert wet, smelly sewage sludge into neat little pellets.The agreement, approved yesterday, gives city officials an answer to a malodorous sludge problem that has hung over the city-owned Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in Baltimore County for years.The answer city officials are touting is to superheat the sludge and convert it into pellets that can be sold as fuel, fertilizer or even material for road construction.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
The historic Lockheed Martin aviation plant in Middle River, which company officials have touted as a dramatic comeback story, is suddenly back on the block as the aerospace giant appears poised to sell the factory to General Electric Co.The plant, which primarily makes jet engine thrust reversers, is part of a transaction that could allow Lockheed Martin to reacquire a chunk of stock now controlled by GE, sources said yesterday.GE got the stock in 1993, when the old Martin Marietta Corp.
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