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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 11, 1991
Plans to build a model environmental home on county land threaten efforts by the Severn River Land Trust to preserve a "greenway" along the river banks.Grant DeHart, executive director of the Maryland Environment Trust, said the Severn land trust is encouraging waterfront property owners to preserve permanently their undeveloped land between the Arlington Echo Environmental Education Center, the Severn RunEnvironmental Area and Indians Landing.So far the negotiations have gone well, DeHart said.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
A natural gas company has agreed to give $500,000 to monitor water quality in the Susquehanna River basin after a Pennsylvania well blowout last year spilled "fracking" fluids into a tributary of the river, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Thursday. Gansler had formally threatened to sue Chesapeake Energy Corp. for allegedly endangering the health of Marylanders by the April 2011 spill in Bradford County, Pa. The river supplies drinking water to 6.2 million people and is home to sensitive Chesapeake Bay fish populations of American shad and striped bass, Gansler noted.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 19, 2000
The Maryland Department of the Environment fined two Allegany County companies yesterday for violating water-quality standards in the Potomac River basin, the state announced. After the department filed a complaint in Allegany County Circuit Court, the Upper Potomac River Commission was fined $360,000. The commission treats industrial and municipal waste. Westvaco Corp., which operates a paper mill in the region, was fined $90,000. Neither company admitted wrongdoing. As part of the agreement, the Department of the Environment also required the river commission to complete upgrades to its plant by Nov. 1 and to be in compliance with state water-quality standards by April 30, 2002.
EXPLORE
January 30, 2012
Laurel City Council member Michael Leszcz was elected chair of the Patuxent River Commission Jan. 11, and Howard County Council Chair Mary Kay Sigaty was elected as the PRC vice chair. Leszcz was first appointed to the PRC in 2005 by Gov. Robert Ehrlich; he was reappointed in 2007 by Gov.Martin O'Malley. He represent Laurel and other municipalities that are adjacent to the Patuxent River Watershed. The PRC is a 34-member, interjurisdictional group created by the General Assembly in 1980 to address Patuxent River watershed issues.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
What the Severn River watershed will look like in 2020 is the subject of a new $25,000 study commissioned by the county.The Severn River Commission, a government-appointed advisory panel, has hired a Washington firm to examine extensively the land-use practices and policies in the 70-square-mile watershed.The study will attempt to determine how the 23-mile river and its tributaries should be managed so they retain their character, said commission member Grant DeHart.The Severn River watershed stretches from Odenton to Severna Park to Annapolis.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Former state Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, hailed as the environmental conscience of the legislature, doesn't need any more plaques for his walls, but he'll make room for the one he'll pick up today.It's the first award in memory of conservationist Jan Hollmann and will be given annually to someone who "has made an exceptional contribution in the field of environmental education in Anne Arundel County," said Severn River Commission chairman A. L. Waldron."Environmental education is one of the most important aspects of long-term environmental protection," said Mr. Winegrad, who spent 16 years in the legislature and left last year.
NEWS
By ARLENE BAKER | March 1, 2006
TODAY Board of Education -- The Board of Education will meet at 10 a.m. to consider the fiscal 2007 operating and capital budget. The meeting will be in the board meeting room of the Dr. Carol S. Parham Administration Building at 2644 Riva Road in Annapolis. 410-222-5311. Human Relations Commission -- The Human Relations Commission of Anne Arundel County will meet at 6 p.m. to discuss discrimination in the public and private sectors. The commission meets on the first Wednesday each month at the Arundel Center, 44 Calvert St., Annapolis.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 7, 1993
Water washing off the Millersville Landfill drains into the Severn River in apparent conflict with a state law that prohibits dumping into the "scenic" waterway.But rather than enforce the 15-year-old prohibition, Maryland Secretary of Natural Resources Torrey C. Brown said that the clause protecting the state's scenic river system will be eliminated.That has outraged activists along the Severn who see the Maryland Coastal Zones Management Program as providing the only teeth in the state's Scenic and Wild Rivers Act.The Severn was designated by lawmakers in 1971 as one of Maryland's nine scenic and wild rivers.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
Better late than never, conservationists are saying of last week's news that the state will purchase 100 acres around an environmentally sensitive trout stream in Gambrills.The state Department of Natural Resources had pledged two years ago to acquire property along the Jabez Branch to protect the last-of-its-kind stream from the damaging effects of development.DNR Assistant Secretary MiKe Nelson renewed that pledge Thursday before the Severn River Commission.Apologizing for the delay, Nelson said the Department of General Services -- the state purchasing agency -- became mired in a web of property deeds that made ownership unclear.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
Think small and cheap, a county planner told the Severn River Commission Thursday.The government-appointed advisory panel has recommended that the county Department of Planning and Zoning examine extensively the land-use practices and policies on the 23-mile scenic river.But Joseph Elbrich, chief of environmental and special project planning, estimated the cost of such a comprehensive study at $500,000 to $1 million."With this year's economy, that's not a realistic expectation," he said.Additionally, Elbrich said the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region has proposed legislation -- aimed at directing new development to established growth areas -- that would require each county to do massive planning studies by 1993.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Environmentalists are questioning Howard County's management of its sewage system and plans to add a $66 million sewer pipe, both crucial to the proposed redevelopment of central Columbia. "We have suspicions about this leaky, stinky pipeline," said Fred Tutman, who represents the nonprofit advocacy group Riverkeepers on Maryland's Patuxent River Commission. County officials strongly defend their stewardship of the system and their efforts to preserve water quality, noting plans to spend $85 million to reduce nutrient runoff from the Little Patuxent Wastewater Reclamation Plant in Savage and the new 10.5-mile pipeline that is to run from Savage through Columbia north to Route 108. Construction is to begin next year.
NEWS
By ARLENE BAKER | March 1, 2006
TODAY Board of Education -- The Board of Education will meet at 10 a.m. to consider the fiscal 2007 operating and capital budget. The meeting will be in the board meeting room of the Dr. Carol S. Parham Administration Building at 2644 Riva Road in Annapolis. 410-222-5311. Human Relations Commission -- The Human Relations Commission of Anne Arundel County will meet at 6 p.m. to discuss discrimination in the public and private sectors. The commission meets on the first Wednesday each month at the Arundel Center, 44 Calvert St., Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2005
Rivers are roads that move. - Blaise Pascal (1670) Recent heavy downpours have created serious flooding in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, sending thousands fleeing to escape rising waters. Besides the disruption of daily lives, the floods have left behind millions of dollars in damages. So far, Maryland has been spared. Despite the same recent rains that have moved through the state and heavy snow melt upriver, the Susquehanna has remained relatively calm. Control of the river, which crested Monday and remained high for 16 hours, was exacted by operators of the Conowingo Dam, who opened 23 of its 50 gates.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2005
PORT DEPOSIT - While walking along this riverfront town's Main Street in September to see firsthand the flood damage from Tropical Storm Ivan, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. turned to Mayor Robert Flayhart and said: "We were lucky. It looks like Port Deposit dodged the bullet, right?" Flayhart agreed. But it was through no kindness of Mother Nature that this 19th-century community escaped the full wrath of the storm. Much of the credit goes to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, a little-known federal agency on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Harrisburg, Pa., that now faces its own threat - not from rising water, but from federal budget cuts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 19, 2000
The Maryland Department of the Environment fined two Allegany County companies yesterday for violating water-quality standards in the Potomac River basin, the state announced. After the department filed a complaint in Allegany County Circuit Court, the Upper Potomac River Commission was fined $360,000. The commission treats industrial and municipal waste. Westvaco Corp., which operates a paper mill in the region, was fined $90,000. Neither company admitted wrongdoing. As part of the agreement, the Department of the Environment also required the river commission to complete upgrades to its plant by Nov. 1 and to be in compliance with state water-quality standards by April 30, 2002.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
BROOMES ISLAND -- For the past 10 years, Bernie Fowler has been taking the pulse of the Patuxent River by wading out into the water on the second Sunday in June to see how deep he can get before he loses sight of his feet.On a breezy, cool day when only the hardiest would think of swimming, the former state senator from Calvert County led a line of shrieking waders into the frigid river up to their stomachs before his dingy white sneakers faded from view."The river is getting better," Fowler proclaimed to the nearly 200 people who joined him for the Calvert County event, which featured speeches, preaching and a Chesapeake Bay rap performed by fifth-graders from Hollywood Elementary School across the river in St. Mary's County.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
Development of the Odenton Town Center parcel will destroy forested wetlands, environmentalists, county planners and property owners agree.But how much of those wetlands must be filled and what impact their destruction will have on the Patuxent and Severn river watersheds is a matter of contention among the groups.Earl Bradley, a Sierra Club member, complained that the plan to fill nearly 11 acres of wetlands is "without precedence in the state," and argued that approving it would give other developers license to destroy large amounts of wetlands as well.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
Two conservation groups are asking the state and county to spend $1 million or more to buy as much woods along Jabez Branch as possible to prevent its development and to further efforts to re-establish trout in the tributary to the Severn River.The Severn River Association and the Severn River Commission have sent letters to state and county officials, asking them to buy the land in order to keep South Shore Development Co. from building 78 houses on the 141.68-acre Holladay Park tract near Millersville.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
Development of the Odenton Town Center parcel will destroy forested wetlands, environmentalists, county planners and property owners agree.But how much of those wetlands must be filled and what impact their destruction will have on the Patuxent and Severn river watersheds is a matter of contention among the groups.Earl Bradley, a Sierra Club member, complained that the plan to fill nearly 11 acres of wetlands is "without precedence in the state," and argued that approving it would give other developers license to destroy large amounts of wetlands as well.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Former state Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, hailed as the environmental conscience of the legislature, doesn't need any more plaques for his walls, but he'll make room for the one he'll pick up today.It's the first award in memory of conservationist Jan Hollmann and will be given annually to someone who "has made an exceptional contribution in the field of environmental education in Anne Arundel County," said Severn River Commission chairman A. L. Waldron."Environmental education is one of the most important aspects of long-term environmental protection," said Mr. Winegrad, who spent 16 years in the legislature and left last year.
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