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BUSINESS
June 4, 1996
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. has finished the first phase of its acquisition of St. Louis' River City Broadcasting, a deal that will make it the seventh-largest broadcasting company in the nation.Baltimore-based Sinclair completed its acquisition of the "nonlicense assets" of River City on Friday. The assets include office space and television and radio equipment, said Pat Talamantes of River City, who has been named head of investor relations for Sinclair."In terms of the acquisition, this is by far the biggest piece of it," Talamantes said.
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EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | March 31, 2013
When the Major League Baseball season starts March 31, Brett Harman won't be on a pitcher's mound. Instead, the 23-year-old Westminster resident will be preparing for a career as a physician assistant. But Harman, who had a standout career at Westminster High and the University of Maryland, isn't ready to give up baseball completely. Later this spring, Harman will leave Carroll County for St. Louis, where the right-hander will pitch for the River City Rascals, on the outskirts of St. Louis.
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BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it has agreed to modify plans to acquire a St. Louis-based broadcasting company after the Department of Justice raised antitrust concerns about the transaction.Baltimore-based Sinclair agreed last month to buy River City Broadcasting L.P. in a $1.2 billion deal. But to appease the Justice Department, Sinclair agreed to modify the current acquisition documents to eliminate its option to acquire the assets of River City's WSYX-TV in Columbus, Ohio, and to drop (( the agreement to enter into a related time-brokerage deal, the company said.
EXPLORE
By Staff Reports | August 16, 2011
The Baltimore City Department of Public Works said Tuesday that an estimated 2.4 million gallons of sewer overflow spilled into the Back River in Baltimore County on Sunday, Aug. 14, emanating from the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant inEssex. Officials of the city public works department - which operates the treatment plant - said in a release that the spill lasted from about 12:20 to 2 p.m. Officials said the cause of the spill is mostly attributable to the heavy rainfall, much of which infiltrated sewer lines resulting in inflow at the facility above normal levels.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
Baltimore's Sinclair Broadcasting Group catapulted into the power elite of American media companies yesterday as it agreed to acquire St. Louis-based River City Broadcasting L. P. in a deal valued at $1.2 billion.Sinclair said the acquisition, its first billion-dollar deal, will make it the seventh-largest TV broadcast group in the United States. The announcement came 25 years to the day after Baltimore's WBFF (Channel 45) became the first of Sinclair's chain of TV stations to go on the air, said Chief Executive Officer David Smith.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1998
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that the Department of Justice has approved its bid to acquire the programming rights and nonlicense assets of a Columbus, Ohio, television station, ABC affiliate WSYX-TV.The Baltimore broadcasting company now has all the regulatory approvals and will exercise its option to acquire the nonlicense assets, including employees and equipment, from River City Broadcasting LP. The $228 million purchase is expected to be financed by bank debt.Sinclair got the option in its $1.2 billion purchase of St. Louis-based River City in April 1996.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 29, 2001
Con artists are naturally theatrical characters. They turn people into suckers by selling them a song and a dance. And yet, Meredith Willson's The Music Man always has seemed too squeaky clean an account of the flimflam trade. The touring production at the Mechanic Theatre won't convince you otherwise. In place of dramatic conflict and whiz-bang spectacle, it delivers a dose of Americana. Of course, a dose of Americana is pretty welcome these days, but this one is a bit bland. If The Music Man is as American as apple pie, then this production is the off-the-shelf, Mrs. Smith's variety.
NEWS
By Sara Trapnell and Sara Trapnell,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
"The fella sells bands. Kids' bands. I don't know how he does it!" Recently, the students at River Hill High School showed us how in their marvelous production of The Music Man. The musical takes place in 1912 and tells the story of a traveling salesman, Harold Hill, and his attempts to con stubborn Iowans in River City into forming a kids' band with Hill as conductor. Little do the townspeople know that Hill can't read a note of music. The sly and crafty character fools them all into buying their children the works -- instruments, music books and even uniforms.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | November 28, 1993
In this corner: an aging, industrial river city trying to reclaim its lost football heritage. And the challenger: an aging, industrial river city trying to reclaim its lost football heritage.If only NFL games were this exciting.The two cities given the best chance of winning the league's next expansion team -- Baltimore and St. Louis -- are so evenly matched that it's hard to tell them apart. They are virtually the same size, have much the same checkered sports history and each boasts a revitalized waterfront.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 4, 2000
PITTSBURGH - For such a smart guy, Brian Billick was surprisingly clueless for once. "I haven't lost here. I hope they never shut the place down," the Ravens' head coach said with a smile yesterday after his team beat the Steelers at Three Rivers Stadium for the second straight year. He'd better not try that idea out on his boss, Ravens owner Art Modell, whose vision of the abyss probably includes Pittsburgh's famously intimidating football stadium, set to close and suffer the wrecking ball after this season.
NEWS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2009
The sixth-ranked River Hill girls basketball team jumped on Parkside early and never relented in the Class 2A state semifinals yesterday at UMBC's RAC Arena. The undefeated Hawks went on a 24-2 run to end the first quarter and didn't look back, building a 30-point halftime lead en route to a 78-39 victory over the Wicomico County team. River Hill (27-0) will try to win its second state title in four years against No. 4 City at 1 p.m. today. "We're excited about the fact we get to advance to the 2A finals again," River Hill coach Teresa Waters said.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY | July 8, 2008
THE PROBLEM // A broken pipe in Robert E. Lee Park caused water to pour down a path for more than a week. THE BACKSTORY // Daniel Pugatsky, who walks his dog in Robert E. Lee Park, noticed water pouring out of a crack in a path just past the footbridge near the dam. The Pikesville resident talked to friends who go there daily and learned it had been draining that way for at least three to four days. In late June, he called Baltimore's 311 system from the park to report the problem. "I said, 'Well, if nobody's fixing it, then maybe nobody knows about it,'" Pugatsky said.
NEWS
By Sara Trapnell and Sara Trapnell,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
"The fella sells bands. Kids' bands. I don't know how he does it!" Recently, the students at River Hill High School showed us how in their marvelous production of The Music Man. The musical takes place in 1912 and tells the story of a traveling salesman, Harold Hill, and his attempts to con stubborn Iowans in River City into forming a kids' band with Hill as conductor. Little do the townspeople know that Hill can't read a note of music. The sly and crafty character fools them all into buying their children the works -- instruments, music books and even uniforms.
NEWS
By Judith Ingber and Judith Ingber,WILDE LAKE HIGH SCHOOL | March 18, 2005
In 1957, Meredith Willson decided to take "76 Trombones," a woman named Marian the librarian and the state of Iowa and create a musical classic, The Music Man. Glenelg High School's recent production presented evenings of dance and song that took the audience back to the time of barbershop quartets, town meetings and traveling salesmen. Originally starring Robert Preston, the musical, with its engaging plot line and appealing score, has seen many revivals. The story of The Music Man follows Professor Harold Hill, a traveling salesman played by Matt Abbott, who is set on cheating the residents of the small town of River City, Iowa, out of money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 16, 2003
It's not easy to find much joy in the deepening gloom of a television midseason consumed with reality TV. But there is the occasional splash of sunlight, like Meredith Willson's The Music Man, airing tonight on ABC's The Wonderful World of Disney. The revival of the musical is surely one of the happier developments throughout popular culture. There are Chicago and Moulin Rouge! in film, as well as The Producers and Hair-spray on Broadway. Television has been doing the musical proud for a number of years with Annie, Gypsy, and Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella on ABC. PBS' Great Performances brought Fosse to the small screen last year, and will stage Cole Porter's Kiss Me, Kate on Feb. 26. The bad news is that there are no truly new musicals in the mix. Supporting the claim that we are indeed living in postmodern times, each of the films, plays or television shows revives material from earlier productions and eras.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 22, 2002
A body found floating in the Patapsco River on Sunday has been identified as that of a 78-year-old Baltimore man last seen at his residence Aug. 15, Maryland Natural Resources Police said yesterday. Four teen-agers spotted the body of Marcus James Perdue as they swam in the Patapsco River near Interstate 895 in Brooklyn Park, police said. No one interviewed by police has been able to account for Perdue's whereabouts since Aug. 15, said Natural Resources spokeswoman Heather Lynch. "We really don't know what the circumstances of his death were," Lynch said.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY | July 8, 2008
THE PROBLEM // A broken pipe in Robert E. Lee Park caused water to pour down a path for more than a week. THE BACKSTORY // Daniel Pugatsky, who walks his dog in Robert E. Lee Park, noticed water pouring out of a crack in a path just past the footbridge near the dam. The Pikesville resident talked to friends who go there daily and learned it had been draining that way for at least three to four days. In late June, he called Baltimore's 311 system from the park to report the problem. "I said, 'Well, if nobody's fixing it, then maybe nobody knows about it,'" Pugatsky said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 16, 2003
It's not easy to find much joy in the deepening gloom of a television midseason consumed with reality TV. But there is the occasional splash of sunlight, like Meredith Willson's The Music Man, airing tonight on ABC's The Wonderful World of Disney. The revival of the musical is surely one of the happier developments throughout popular culture. There are Chicago and Moulin Rouge! in film, as well as The Producers and Hair-spray on Broadway. Television has been doing the musical proud for a number of years with Annie, Gypsy, and Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella on ABC. PBS' Great Performances brought Fosse to the small screen last year, and will stage Cole Porter's Kiss Me, Kate on Feb. 26. The bad news is that there are no truly new musicals in the mix. Supporting the claim that we are indeed living in postmodern times, each of the films, plays or television shows revives material from earlier productions and eras.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 29, 2001
Con artists are naturally theatrical characters. They turn people into suckers by selling them a song and a dance. And yet, Meredith Willson's The Music Man always has seemed too squeaky clean an account of the flimflam trade. The touring production at the Mechanic Theatre won't convince you otherwise. In place of dramatic conflict and whiz-bang spectacle, it delivers a dose of Americana. Of course, a dose of Americana is pretty welcome these days, but this one is a bit bland. If The Music Man is as American as apple pie, then this production is the off-the-shelf, Mrs. Smith's variety.
NEWS
By Maureen Milford and Maureen Milford,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Unlike the waterfronts in historic East Coast cities that developed their harbors as attractions for residents and tourists, Philadelphia's bleak eastern edge is experienced by most people as a blur as they rocket by on Interstate 95. Because the highway parallels the Delaware River, it has served as a psychological and, to a point, physical barrier to redevelopment of the city's Colonial gateway. Now, with construction of a $75 million apartment building - the first high-rise residential development actually on the river in the city's more than 300-year history - the wall may be beginning to disappear.
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