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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 27, 1994
About 100 tons of concrete from the old Severn River Bridge is being dumped onto the river bottom this morning just north of the new bridge to form what conservationists hope will become a reef for oysters to help cleanse the water.Wednesday, about 1,350 tons of oyster shells is to be blasted off a barge by high-pressure hose into the waters of Round Bay to form two more reefs.The moves are part of the first large-scale effort to restore the Severn River, which has been heavily silted by development.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Obama administration officials converged Friday on Baltimore to announce a new initiative to clean up and redevelop blighted urban watersheds — with the ailing Patapsco River one of seven waterways chosen nationwide to test a partnership between federal agencies and local communities.  "Urban waters across our nation are brimming with potential," Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said at a news conference in Middle Branch...
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NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
As rescue divers continued to search in vain, Jeffrey Pangburn fought to keep himself from admitting his son, Michael, 14, probably had drowned in the Susquehanna River vTC near Havre de Grace this week while swimming with friends."
SPORTS
March 19, 2011
Dana Ely of Fulton writes: I will be forced to purchase $200 dollar rubber-soled wading boots because the state of Maryland used its regulatory power to ban felt soles. I don't think there was enough time for comment and wonder why this occurred since Didymo is already in the Gunpowder and Savage rivers. I think this was done far too quickly, without much comment from the stakeholders. The Department of Natural Resources could have emailed all trout stamp holders of a possible change in regulations.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | July 26, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - The General Electric Co. will begin a study of the Hudson River next month to map out exactly what portions of river bottom will be dredged to remove PCBs, according to an agreement reached with federal environmental officials. The settlement caps more than three months of negotiations between the company and the EPA and signals that the $500 million dredging project - first proposed in December 2000 by the Clinton administration - is now under way. But the company did not reimburse the government the full $37.5 million spent determining that dredging was the best course for cleaning up the river.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | October 20, 2002
MOREAU, N.Y. - The water was perfectly still, reflecting the autumn leaves dangling overhead. A mallard duck fished tail-side-up for food near the river's shore. Nature, at least, was oblivious to the work under way on the Hudson River, as contractors for the General Electric Co. pierced the most contaminated stretch of river bottom in order to map out what portions will be dredged. For at least some of the people living along the river, the activity on display made the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's $500 million dredging plan real.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
ELK NECK STATE PARK -- If all goes according to plan today, marine salvage crews plan to raise a sunken tugboat that has blocked shipping traffic at the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal since Monday's fog-shrouded collision with a 525-foot cargo vessel on the Elk River -- an accident that left four crewmen missing and presumed dead. Coast Guard officials said last night that divers were attempting to attach steel cables and straps beneath the tug, the Swift, the last step in a delicate weeklong recovery effort before lifting the 60-foot vessel.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 2001
ABOARD THE R. IAN FLETCHER, off Nyack, N.Y. - About a thousand years ago, a hurricane of cataclysmic proportions swept up the Hudson River. Or perhaps it was the mother of all nor'easters. No one knows. What is clear, however, is that the force of the storm was beyond any recorded or remembered human experience. Great swaths of the river bottom were scraped up and moved about in one ferocious flood. Robin E. Bell, a senior research scientist at Columbia University, has seen the storm in her imagination, and touched with her fingers the dense, black-earth core drilling samples that reveal, in their banded marks, the river's ancient trauma.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011
Dana Ely of Fulton writes: I will be forced to purchase $200 dollar rubber-soled wading boots because the state of Maryland used its regulatory power to ban felt soles. I don't think there was enough time for comment and wonder why this occurred since Didymo is already in the Gunpowder and Savage rivers. I think this was done far too quickly, without much comment from the stakeholders. The Department of Natural Resources could have emailed all trout stamp holders of a possible change in regulations.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
SUMMERTIME, Nan's Cove, Broomes Island, Patuxent River, Southern Maryland, 1956. Dixie Buck is poised with a crab net on the bow of her little skiff, ready to dip any soft crab she spies in the clear water on the grassy river bottom. That was the year the late Mrs. Buck, who spent about 70 years gazing down into the Patuxent after crabs and oysters, recalled thinking it was getting harder to see the bottom. When I interviewed her 25 years later, a six-year, $28 million study was confirming her early observations of cloudier water, which had worsened and spread throughout the Chesapeake and all its rivers.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
AQUASCO — A decade after 140,000 gallons of oil leaked into a Patuxent River tributary and became Maryland's worst spill, the water doesn't show a hint of the environmental devastation. But wedge a stick into the bottom of Swanson Creek and it comes up slimed with oil. Oil from that April 2000 spill fouled 20 miles of shoreline, devastated water-dependent businesses and killed hundreds of turtles, fish, muskrats and other wildlife. Those who helped clean up acknowledge that the process was chaotic, and that remnants of the slick remain buried in the Southern Maryland river bottom.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Brian Schilpp, who has spent his life along Back River, said he was never more proud of that heritage than on Wednesday, when he was overlooking a trash boom filled with waterlogged garbage. Baltimore County installed the heavy-duty vinyl boom last month at a cost of $80,000. The 700-foot-long entrapment device, held in place by seven anchors, has been stationed at the headwaters of the Back River, a waterway often reviled for its foul smells and trash-lined banks. While the boom halts the flow of debris downstream, it also shows how much trash is dumped into area waterways.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun reporter | July 12, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.VA. - If you're into tubing, this town is your Woodstock. On just about any weekend in the summer, hundreds of tubers can be seen taking lazy, meandering trips down the picturesque Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, many with coolers and beach umbrellas in tow. But we weren't into lazy, OK? We weren't into meandering. We wanted some action. Well, as long as it didn't kill us. So on a recent weekend, my wife, Nancy, and I took a guided white-water tubing trip on the Potomac with River Riders, an outfit that claims to offer the only licensed Class III white-water tubing in the area.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Arianne Dalton couldn't see the muddy bottom of the South River, which is exactly why she was standing waist-deep in the water holding a rock covered with baby oysters. "You just have to feel for the edge of the rocks and where the land starts," said Dalton, who enjoys sailing on the bay. "It's our environment, where we live. ... I've seen it degrade and I want to do my part to help it out." Dalton, an Annapolis resident, and about a dozen other volunteers took the plunge for the environment Monday evening at Edgewater Beach, adding about 680 rocks caked with 2-month-old oysters to the river bottom to create a reef in hopes of improving water clarity and quality.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
SUMMERTIME, Nan's Cove, Broomes Island, Patuxent River, Southern Maryland, 1956. Dixie Buck is poised with a crab net on the bow of her little skiff, ready to dip any soft crab she spies in the clear water on the grassy river bottom. That was the year the late Mrs. Buck, who spent about 70 years gazing down into the Patuxent after crabs and oysters, recalled thinking it was getting harder to see the bottom. When I interviewed her 25 years later, a six-year, $28 million study was confirming her early observations of cloudier water, which had worsened and spread throughout the Chesapeake and all its rivers.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | October 20, 2002
MOREAU, N.Y. - The water was perfectly still, reflecting the autumn leaves dangling overhead. A mallard duck fished tail-side-up for food near the river's shore. Nature, at least, was oblivious to the work under way on the Hudson River, as contractors for the General Electric Co. pierced the most contaminated stretch of river bottom in order to map out what portions will be dredged. For at least some of the people living along the river, the activity on display made the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's $500 million dredging plan real.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
The old Severn River Bridge is headed for the bottom of the river to become one of the first oyster recovery projects since the December signing of a pact to restore the Chesapeake Bay's shellfish population.The innovative project is designed to create an oyster bed that will help naturally purify water and attract fish while serving as pilot program for studying artificial reefs and aquaculture."Getting 21,000 tons of concrete slab is "the opportunity of a lifetime," said William Moulden.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | July 29, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - The General Electric Co. will begin a study of the Hudson River next month to map out exactly what portions of river bottom will be dredged to remove PCBs, according to an agreement reached with federal environmental officials. The settlement caps more than three months of negotiations between the company and the EPA and signals that the $500 million dredging project - first proposed in December 2000 by the Clinton administration - is now under way. But the company did not reimburse the government the full $37.5 million spent determining that dredging was the best course for cleaning up the river.
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