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By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
Maryland boating officials are considering speed limits on the upper Potomac River, measures that even proponents say don't go far enough in curbing reckless boating on the popular waterway.Under proposed regulations, speed limits of 35 knots (41 mph) would be imposed on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays -- the days of heaviest use -- and 20 knots (23 mph) would be in effect from sunset to 10 a.m.The speed limits are among several regulations state boating officials have proposed to ensure public safety along a heavily used stretch of the Potomac River from Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1994
Once or twice a year, silt and debris clog the Little Patuxent River east of Laurel, and officials at Fort Meade send bulldozers into the stream to dredge the channel to keep the silt from being sucked into intake pipes at the fort's drinking water plant.Now, officials at the post say they have a plan to shore up the river banks, reduce the erosion and improve the river's health, as well as protect their water plant, which sits at a dam north of Md. Route 198.Fort Meade's department of public works has proposed shoring up about 1,000 feet of the river bank with rock, called rip rap, and planting aquatic vegetation over the rip rap. A final dredging would clear the area and restore a clogged side channel.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1994
Once or twice a year, silt and debris clog the Little Patuxent River east of Laurel, and officials at Fort Meade send bulldozers into the stream to dredge the channel to keep the silt from being sucked into intake pipes at the fort's drinking water plant.Now, officials at the post say they have a plan to shore up the river banks, reduce the erosion and improve the river's health, as well as protect their water plant, which sits at a dam north of Md. Route 198.Fort Meade's department of public works has proposed shoring up about 1,000 feet of the river bank with rock, called rip rap, and planting aquatic vegetation over the rip rap. A final dredging would clear the area and restore a clogged side channel.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
Maryland boating officials are considering speed limits on the upper Potomac River, measures that even proponents say don't go far enough in curbing reckless boating on the popular waterway.Under proposed regulations, speed limits of 35 knots (41 mph) would be imposed on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays -- the days of heaviest use -- and 20 knots (23 mph) would be in effect from sunset to 10 a.m.The speed limits are among several regulations state boating officials have proposed to ensure public safety along a heavily used stretch of the Potomac River from Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Contributing Writer | June 20, 1993
They worried about the Union soldiers encamped just over the hill, but the Confederates first had to battle ants, earwigs and, most of all, the 95-degree heat.Company D of the 2nd Maryland Infantry fought yesterday on the rolling fields of Steppingstone Museum along the banks of the Susquehanna River, and their re-enactment continues today with drills, a cavalry demonstration and a chance once again to change the outcome of the war that still fascinates so many.Members of the company arrived at Steppingstone Friday night and set up a camp that is an authentic replica of Civil War camps.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1994
A photo accompanying an article in Sunday's Sun about th murder of an ex-Marine whose experiences were the basis for the movie "A Few Good Men" misidentified the man's attorney. )) His name is Don Marcari.The Sun regrets the errors.NEEDHAM, Mass. -- They are apparently unrelated flashes of violence, framing the final eight years of David Cox's life, from the front lines of the Cold War in Cuba to a muddy river bank in suburban Boston.The most traumatic incident of his military tour in Cuba would inspire a movie that left him indignant, his and his comrades' service careers altered to quench Hollywood's desire for drama.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2001
DULUTH, Ga. - Tiger Woods has spent most of his career on the PGA Tour chasing "The Bear." With six major championships among his 28 PGA Tour victories, Woods is well on pace to break the record of 18 major professional championships belonging to Jack Nicklaus. Last month, Woods was salmon fishing with Mark O'Meara and John Cook in Alaska. It was a successful trip, almost too successful. "Mark landed a king [salmon] almost a half-mile down the river," Woods recalled yesterday. "He dragged it along the bank.
NEWS
December 27, 2006
Pasadena man lying in road fatally injured A Pasadena man was fatally injured yesterday evening when he was run over by a car while lying in the center of the road near his home, Anne Arundel County police said. The victim, Michael Anthony Tyler, 49, of the 8300 block of Beechwood Park Road, was in the center of Beechwood Park Road near Magothy Bridge Road shortly before 5:30 p.m. when he was run over by a 1993 Lexus driven by Brandon Drew Carmody, 32, of the 1300 block of River Bank Court in Curtis Bay. Tyler was pronounced dead a short time later at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
The body of a young bald eagle killed along the upper Hudson River contained high concentrations of PCBs, a toxic industrial chemical that is the Hudson's last significant taint, New York state environmental scientists have reported.The finding, although limited to one eagle, is significant, the scientists said, because similar levels of PCBs in eagles or eagle eggs from polluted areas of the Great Lakes have been linked to reproductive problems and deformities in the birds. The scientists said they were concerned about PCB contamination of eagles because, after nearly a century in which the birds of prey were only rarely seen along the Hudson, eagles have begun nesting on its banks in the last few years.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2008
Our neighbor said we should dump our leaf piles on the river bank for erosion control. Does this work? This might seem like a good idea but it would be terrible for the Chesapeake Bay if done on any waterway, large or small. Of course, stopping erosion is good and recycling leaves on-site is good. The problem is that decomposing leaves release loads of nitrogen, which then gets washed immediately into the bay. High levels of nitrogen, whether from fertilizer in home lawns, animal manure or farms fields, make algae growth explode in the bay. Algae soon dies, and its decomposition uses up the oxygen in the water.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Contributing Writer | June 20, 1993
They worried about the Union soldiers encamped just over the hill, but the Confederates first had to battle ants, earwigs and, most of all, the 95-degree heat.Company D of the 2nd Maryland Infantry fought yesterday on the rolling fields of Steppingstone Museum along the banks of the Susquehanna River, and their re-enactment continues today with drills, a cavalry demonstration and a chance once again to change the outcome of the war that still fascinates so many.Members of the company arrived at Steppingstone Friday night and set up a camp that is an authentic replica of Civil War camps.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 3, 1995
DHAKA, Bangladesh -- Hillary Rodham Clinton has practiced law, raised a daughter and tried to change the American economy by reshaping health care.But within 24 hours she had ridden a bull elephant with Secret Service radio escort and met the man responsible for making her a Hillary with two l's.At an airstrip in Katmandu, Nepal -- just after an overnight tiger safari and just before her departure for this poverty-ridden pocket of South Asia -- Mrs. Clinton...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 27, 2001
It's the largest river in North America, rising in Minnesota and flowing 2,350 miles south to the Gulf of Mexico. Along the way, in spring or early summer, the Mississippi River is prone to overflowing its banks. A warm spell in early spring that quickly melts snow in Canada can amplify the floods. So can heavy spring rains. So can rains in early summer. At this time of year, from March to June, the runoff from snowmelt meets the rains, and every tributary swells, and the river challenges its banks and the levees expensively built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
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