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NEWS
April 19, 2009
The Severn River Association will hold a forum with Anne Arundel County Council members at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Calvary Methodist Church, 301 Rowe Blvd., Annapolis. The topic will be "The Severn River Watershed: Preserve, Protect, and Restore." All three members of the County Council - Jamie Benoit, Josh Cohen and Cathy Vitale - whose voting districts include the Severn River watershed, are expected to attend. Residents can meet with their council representatives, learn their views on watershed issues, express their opinion, discuss legislative action that might benefit the watershed, and ask council members what public actions they are prepared to support.
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NEWS
April 19, 2009
The Severn River Association will hold a forum with Anne Arundel County Council members at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Calvary Methodist Church, 301 Rowe Blvd., Annapolis. The topic will be "The Severn River Watershed: Preserve, Protect, and Restore." All three members of the County Council - Jamie Benoit, Josh Cohen and Cathy Vitale - whose voting districts include the Severn River watershed, are expected to attend. Residents can meet with their council representatives, learn their views on watershed issues, express their opinion, discuss legislative action that might benefit the watershed, and ask council members what public actions they are prepared to support.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2002
After 90 years of running on volunteer steam, Severn River Association is looking to hire its first paid staffer. The move is necessary as the organization - one of the oldest environmental groups in the country - seeks to capture more grant money and bring structure to its membership and education activities, said association President David Wallace. "The primary reason is to establish a fund-raising mechanism and have cohesion from administration to administration," he said. "Areas like getting out the newsletter and membership functions tend to wax and wane depending on the time the volunteer has to spend on them," said Wallace, a self-employed engineer.
NEWS
October 19, 2008
Benefits upgraded for volunteer firefighters More than 500 volunteer firefighters in Anne Arundel County are now eligible to receive some benefits previously limited to full-time firefighters, County Executive John R. Leopold has announced. The benefits, under the Employees Assistance Program (EAP), include mental health and wellness benefits for county fire companies' volunteers. "All of our members are incredibly important to us," Leopold said. "Career and volunteer firefighters are exposed to some of the most difficult situations that can be encountered, and I wanted to make sure such services are available to everyone."
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | March 6, 1991
The sale of tickets to the St. Patrick's dinner-dance under the sponsorship of Knights of Columbus Keough Council has begun.This annual gala will be at 8 p.m. March 16 at Corrigan Hall adjoining St. Joseph's Catholic Church off Odenton Road.The menu includes a full-course dinner, with hors d'oeuvres available before and after the meal. In addition, chips, pretzels, setups,whiskey sours, beer, coffee, rolls and dessert are included in the admission price of $16 per person.The "Wall of Sound" will providedance music.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1996
Steve Carr has been privileged to watch the Chesapeake more than most, living since birth in the big, white house on the high bluff across from the Naval Academy.Here, near the mouth of the Severn, he's seen the river gain and the front yard lose. How much?Between the cliff's edge and the rail fence in his front yard, "it's gone from nine lawn-mower widths to one," he says.That would have been since his boyhood -- slow erosion by bay standards, but enough for newer homeowners along the bluff to armor their properties with rock and bulkheading that have eliminated the beaches Carr walked "like ritual" as a kid.More ominous was the change he saw in the submerged grass beds that lined the Severn here "so thick our neighbor's dalmatian got hung up and drowned when I was 10."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2003
Paul Spadaro wanted to put 1,000 years' worth of oysters into the Magothy River yesterday. That's how long he thought it would take the waterway to produce the amount of oysters he had in nearly 300 mesh bags that were loaded onto a series of boats and barges. "Nature is taking a lot of hits right now and sometimes it needs some help," he said. Of course, Spadaro wasn't counting on any of his boats taking a hit during the process. So when a barge holding about 20 bags of immature oysters sank under the wake of a passing boat, he was understandably shocked.
NEWS
June 2, 1991
Weems may reopenClosed for more than a week due to a sewage spill. Weems Creek may reopen for swimming and other water sports tomorrow, a Health Department spokesman said.Emergency closings, openings and other water quality information is available to county residents through a new Health De-partment telephone service.The recorded information line was switched on Memorial Day weekend in response to Severn River residents who wanted easy access to the Health Department's weekly water quality test results.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
For the people living along the Magothy River, August 1946 marked the start of an effort to protect their waterway and its environs. The Magothy River Association was formed to "improve the channel markings, lights and harbor facilities of the Magothy River to promote the general welfare of the river's waterfront homes and beaches," according to an article that appeared in The Sun on Aug. 11, 1946. The association began by opposing the Navy's building of an airport at what is now Sandy Point State Park.
NEWS
May 19, 1995
The Severn River Association, among the oldest and most influential conservation coalitions in the state, unanimously elected officers to two-year terms this week.Taking over as president will be Steven Carr, who has been the group's lobbyist and made an unsuccessful bid for the House of Delegates last year. Eileen McLellan will be first vice president; Jane Sinclair, second vice president; Ted Knowles, treasurer; and Arthur Greenbaum, recording secretary. Current president William Moulden will become corresponding secretary.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 8, 2008
Patricia Herold Nielsen, an environmental activist and founding member of the Eastern Shore's Chester River Association, died of breast cancer Feb. 28 at her Brooklyn, N.Y., home. She was 59. Born and raised Patricia Herold in Westfield, N.J., she earned a degree in English literature from Emmanuel College in Boston in 1970. She began her broadcasting career at WBUR-FM in Boston as an associate producer, and later joined WCVB-TV, also in Boston, as a member of its award-winning documentary unit.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | July 29, 2007
To the protectors of the Magothy River, the 200-foot-long pier jutting out from Dobbins Island is the equivalent of a finger poking them in the eye. Island owner David L. Clickner Sr. recently constructed the pier for the boats he hopes to dock at the house he hopes to build. Environmentalists are questioning why the state and Anne Arundel County would give Clickner permission to build a pier while they are appealing the zoning variances that allowed its construction. "We thought it was irresponsible for construction to move forward when the [variances are]
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Environmental groups attempting to block the construction of a lavish home on a private island in the Magothy River have until July to find the money to purchase the island, its owner said yesterday. David L. Clickner Sr., who owns Dobbins Island, a 7-acre island near the mouth of the river, said he agreed to postpone a two-day hearing before the Board of Appeals scheduled to begin today, at the request of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. The Annapolis-based foundation, which has opposed the project along with the Magothy River Association, said it has several experts who are unavailable to testify this week, Clickner said.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
A homebuilder embroiled in a legal battle over his illegally built house on a Magothy River island has filed a $3.5 million defamation lawsuit against the environmentalist leading the fight to have it razed. Daryl C. Wagner has accused Paul Spadaro, president of the Magothy River Association, of making false verbal and written statements that have hurt his business reputation and in general "discouraged others in the community from having a good opinion" of Wagner "and/or from associating or dealing with" him. Wagner owns Wagner Homes Inc. According to a court summons issued May 5 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, Wagner seeks $1 million in compensatory damages and $2.5 million in punitive damages.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals will convene Wednesday the first of what could be several hearings concerning Daryl C. Wagner, the homebuilder who built a more than 5,000-square-foot house without permits on a small Magothy River isle known as Little Island. The state Critical Area Commission, along with two environmental groups -- the Magothy River Association and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation -- filed an appeal after a county official granted retroactive variances in October allowing Wagner to keep his home.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
For the people living along the Magothy River, August 1946 marked the start of an effort to protect their waterway and its environs. The Magothy River Association was formed to "improve the channel markings, lights and harbor facilities of the Magothy River to promote the general welfare of the river's waterfront homes and beaches," according to an article that appeared in The Sun on Aug. 11, 1946. The association began by opposing the Navy's building of an airport at what is now Sandy Point State Park.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | August 22, 1991
Declaring victory, the parks department has retreated from a controversial policy to sell advertising along the B & A trail.The Department of Recreation and Parks announced Tuesday that the 3-month-old policy had accomplished its goal of ridding the trail of illegal advertising, even though no businesses were willing to pay $250 per year to buy into the plan."
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
None of the nearly 50 people who attended the Anne Arundel Community College Board of Trustees meeting Tuesday night were completely opposed to the school's plans to expand onto 23 acres nearby.But few could agree on what to do with an additional 40 acres the college doesn't need for now.Some wanted the college to place it in a permanent conservation easement. Others urged the school to plan for the long term as well as the immediate future."Do recognize the uniqueness of this parcel," said James E. Gutman, a member of the Magothy River Association who said he was speaking only for himself.
NEWS
July 24, 2005
Rezoning plan could damage the Magothy The County Council is considering Bill 49-05, a comprehensive rezoning bill that includes provisions to rezone 8217 Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard, where the Natural Wood Waste Recycling facility operates, from the current R1 and C4 zoning to W2. This property abuts the headwaters of the Magothy River, and the Magothy River Association strongly objects to this rezoning. W2 zoning provides for industrial use and is not appropriate for this environmentally sensitive location - for example, this area is the site of a DNR project to restore yellow perch.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
Odenton's 35-year-old town center plan, long beset by delays, may face yet another setback: organized opposition to its request to fill in wetlands. The two major landowners of the parcel near Routes 175 and 32 have applied for permits with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Maryland Department of the Environment to fill 7 acres of nontidal wetlands for part of the mixed-use development. This month the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Sierra Club and the Severn River Association filed objections to the permit, said Walter Washington Jr., the chief of one of the Maryland regulatory branches at the Corps' Baltimore office.
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