Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRituals
IN THE NEWS

Rituals

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 25, 2010
I 'm not sure when it happened, exactly, but at some point my children's birthday celebrations shifted from parties with pizza and cake to something more closely resembling a destination wedding, complete with a gift registry. We went from My Little Pony parties and GI Joe parties to plane tickets to the beach or Vegas. And now that my children are in their 20s, their birthdays seem to go on for weeks, if not the entire month. They're kind of like festivals. And if they aren't celebrating their own, they are celebrating the birthday of someone else in their pack, including any number of dinners out and an equal number of little gift bags.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Chris Davis has a goofy, daily ritual when he walks by the magnetic lineup board outside of manager Buck Showalter's office at Camden Yards. The regular first baseman, who usually bats in the middle of the order, will put his name in the lineup at a random spot with a random position next to it. “Whether it's No. 9 or pitching, whether it's the two-hole, playing first, sometimes I'll play the outfield.” Davis said about his lineup game....
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | March 12, 1998
Three artists working in various natural and synthetic materials but with a common ground in recollections of ancient ritual constitute the exhibit opening Wednesday at the Main Street Gallery in Annapolis. Ron Artman's stoneware vessels with textured surfaces recall ancient warrior rituals and bear Asian, African and Middle Eastern titles. Ann Congdon incorporates building artifacts and high-tech materials in her "Archifacts," combining references to the ancient and modern. Sheila Miller's works combine clay with antique beads and metals to suggest the mythical past.
NEWS
By James Westwater | March 4, 2014
In our religious relationships there are frequently rituals and symbols: the sign of the cross, prayers, special embraces, a kiss. These customs are expressions of our humility, love and heartfelt needs. Many people who seldom go to church make a concerted effort to get there on Ash Wednesday to receive ashes. It is an annual ritual. As a boy, I recall churches opening at 6 a.m., so people could get their ashes before work. It seemed a curious thing to do, accepting a cross of ash on one's forehead - a symbol of our mortality and repentance.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | July 15, 1997
WHEN MY sister's family approaches the altar for Holy Communion, they break out of the single-file line and gather in a group before the priest, and she, her husband and their four children take the sacred wafer in unison."
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | May 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Recently a stranger approached me as I was leaving the annual Project Excellence dinner that I run, where $3.8 million in scholarships had been given to 106 black high school graduates."
NEWS
June 15, 2005
IT SEEMS this country may finally be coming to grips with the grim ghosts that challenge its claim to be a bastion of liberty and justice for all. In re-examining racially inspired killings and apologizing for looking the other way so long, officials around the country are acknowledging the mob mentality once allowed to hold sway here. Used primarily as a tool to intimidate and control blacks, the ritualized violence of lynching and other forms of message murder practiced primarily in the South and West was also directed at immigrants and Indians.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2002
MANY STUDENTS left school Wednesday with this farewell: "Hope I don't see you tomorrow." That night, youngsters flushed toilets at 9 p.m., threw ice cubes out their bedroom window and walked backward to bed. This quirky behavior highlights many students' belief that certain rituals are necessary the eve of a predicted - and much hoped for - snow day. With snow in the forecast Wednesday night, students throughout Carroll performed their unusual rites....
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 14, 2003
I have celebrated every Christmas of my life in Pittsburgh. I have lived some 250 miles away for all of my grown-up years, but I have made the pilgrimage to Pittsburgh for the holidays. This is true for my children, too, who believed for years that Santa only came to Grandma's house in Pittsburgh. They have never opened their eyes in their own beds on Christmas morning, and they have never complained. All the grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins were in Pittsburgh -- and so were all the presents.
NEWS
By Hoke L. Smith | June 12, 2001
UNLIKE many rituals, there are no guidebooks for the rite of passage that we call commencement. We have manuals and "how-to" books for watching operas, planning weddings and tasting wines along with "books for dummies" on everything from fitness walking to NASCAR racing. But we have no written words to direct or guide us through the joyous solemnity of commencement - or the American way of graduating. After 44 years of commencements, I've learned one or two things about this celebration of both endings and beginnings - and how to survive them for long periods.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's high time for all to get involved with recycling agendas. I live in a condominium in northeast Baltimore County where, on every street, there are dumpsters, clearly denoted for either garbage or recycling. They are strategically placed throughout the complex. And yet when I open the lid of the garbage dumpster, I see many recyclable items. Should I have to be the one who has to differentiate between garbage and recyclables and sort out those items for my neighbors? Are there still people truly that lazy, that indifferent, to the concept?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2013
The Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens have three wins and five losses; they just lost to the Cleveland Browns for the first time in seven seasons, and they play the conference-leading Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. So I'll say this: The home team could use a Maori haka right about now, and I know where to get one. The Baltimore-Chesapeake Brumbies, the city's entry in the Mid-Atlantic Rugby Football Union, have been practicing the haka - the most famous pre-game ritual in the world - for the last seven weeks.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 20, 2013
In the two months after 9/11, I called Baltimore County police to check out a black-and-tan backpack left by an office door in Towson, reported an abandoned carry-on bag at BWI to Maryland State Police and refused to watch a bulky valise for a stranger who wanted to leave it with me while he went to the restroom at the airport. Anyone who lived through 9/11 remembers those days of hyper-vigilance. And if that uncomfortable state of mind ever left us as the years went by, it certainly returned last week.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | December 29, 2012
For many Carroll residents, a visit to the Pleasant Valley Christmas Train Garden is a touchstone of the holiday season that brings them back year after year. And each year for the past 30 years, there have been others who discover the garden's magic for the first time and make plans to return to the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Company station in pastoral hamlet of Pleasant Valley for a visit the following December as well. Mike Chrest, of Union Mills, a long-time volunteer firefighter, has been the principal curator and keeper of the roughly 18- by 18-foot HO-gauge train garden, which casts a warm glow in the dimly lit gallery-sized room where it is housed.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 14, 2012
Look at what has become national ritual: A horrific shooting in some otherwise ordinary corner of the country - this time a town in Connecticut - with many dead and wounded, shock and grief, wall-to-wall television coverage. The president and the governor ask us to pray for the victims and their families. A police chief, suddenly and reluctantly a celebrity, provides details of the killings, including the make and model of the weapons. We're told to refrain from politicizing tragedy in its immediate aftermath - that's part of the ritual, too. More grieving, more stories and magazine covers, a week of funerals.
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Whether she's sporting face paint, a mask or a bright purple wig, Jean Keister loves to prove her passion for the Ravens. "I try to wear something different to every single game," said Keister, who inherited her enthusiasm for football from her father. "I started off as a Colts fan, then they left Baltimore and I was not a fan of any team until we got the Ravens," said Keister, who is 46 and lives in Stevensville. "I pretty much stopped watching football during that time. " Her husband, John, is a Steelers fan, but Keister said that's no problem for her. "We got married before the Ravens were in town," Keister said.
NEWS
By John Milton Wesley | September 11, 2006
Most of the rituals are gone now, although I still catch myself staring at the yellow Lands' End short jacket she hung on the closet door in the foyer before she left that Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001. She was on her way to Dulles to board American Airlines Flight 77. Perhaps it was an omen, a kind of warning for me to use caution in the days ahead. We were to be married Dec. 22. And maybe it was just a jacket she forgot in haste. It now hangs in my bedroom closet, not in among the rows of stuff but out where I can see it and be reminded that caution has now become one of the rituals I live by. Others I have learned to let go in order to heal.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 1, 1992
They are four adults who share a house in Boston, busy professionals with crowded lives. Days may elapse in which they barely see one another. Most weekdays, their television set sits idle in the living room.But every Saturday night, the house mates -- three men and a woman -- adhere to a practice that has become near-sacred. First, they gather for their one group dinner of the week. Then, with an eager sense of expectation, they move into the living room and watch "Star Trek, The Next Generation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Zach Phillips keeps a few lucky quarters in his pocket. Pedro Strop wears Ninja Turtle boxers. And Jason Hammel - well, it got so extreme that he had to swear off the whole superstition thing. It was, he says, a distraction. "Yeah, I've actually gotten away from that," says Hammel, the Orioles right-hander who was among the league's elite pitchers this season until a recurring knee injury forced him onto the disabled list for much of the second half. "I used to do superstitions - where I went to eat, when I left to go eat, the way I put my socks on, wearing the same pair of underwear for each start.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 13, 2012
Update: The New York City Board of Health voted unanimously to require parents to sign consent forms before their kids can have Jewish ritual circumcision. Read the New York Times account here.   A group of Johns Hopkins ethicists have written a letter to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg supporting a proposed amendment to require written consent for circumcisions that include an orthodox Jewish practice some say leads to to herpes. The New York City Board of Health has proposed the amendment and could vote on the issue today.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.