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By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | May 18, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley called Wednesday's Flower Mart a rite of passage, which it is in many ways, though I do not know precisely what passage the mayor had in mind. As a rite of passage for the event itself, it is significant that the annual flower display with food and entertainment has survived all these years since it made its debut 92 years ago, despite some interruptions. As a rite of passage in time, if not in genuine progress, it is significant, too. The article describing the Flower Mart noted that crab cakes and, of course, those lemons with little peppermint sticks still were being sold, just as they were almost a century ago when the Women's Civic League opened the first Flower Mart.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
By midmorning Tuesday, Naval Academy Midshipman Kevin Saxton had been awake for eight hours, tackled an obstacle course, survived an endurance run and beat his classmates with pugil sticks. Sweat dripping down his face as he scarfed down trail mix, Saxton said his day at the annual academy Sea Trials was already a success - a sweaty, sandy, muddy good time with his band of classmates in Annapolis. "It's a lot of fun. Pretty physically challenging," said Saxton, a systems engineering major from Grand Rapids, Mich., who aspires to be a Marine Corps pilot.
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By Arthur J. Magida | September 24, 2006
"Sh'ma Yisrael Adonai Elohaynu Adonai Echad." "Hear, oh Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One." That one sentence is the essential, elemental creed of Judaism. But what God is that? A Christian God? A Jewish God? A Muslim God? A Hindu God? (Although it may be more correct to say, Hindu gods, because Hindus have hundreds of thousands, maybe even several million gods.) I'm certainly not talking about a Buddhist God, as God has no place in Buddhism. Everyone, in every faith, approaches God in his own time and his own fashion.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
What once was teenage rite of passage — getting a driver's license — is being postponed as younger people choose to take public transportation, can't afford a car or simply decide they don't need one. In Maryland and across the country, 16-year-olds are obtaining driver's licenses in fewer numbers than two decades ago, sometimes waiting years before attempting that dreaded parallel parking test, according to a national study by the AAA Foundation...
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
When Pam and Dan Pisner woke up yesterday morning, they were the parents of five children.By day's end, the Olney couple were the parents of five adult Jews: Devin, Ian, Michael, Elliot and Shira, 13-year-old quintuplets who became b'nai mitzvah yesterday."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
State officials agreed yesterday to allow a private company to open a juvenile facility in Carroll County, a move that troubled advocates and some lawmakers who say the Department of Juvenile Services took a dangerous step backward. Nevada-based Rite of Passage received a license from the department to open a 48-bed program for boys deemed offenders in juvenile court. The facility, called Silver Oak Academy, will be at the site of the former Bowling Brook Preparatory School, which was shuttered two years ago when a boy in custody died.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2008
A Nevada company that recently purchased the grounds of the Bowling Brook Preparatory School - a Carroll County youth lockup that was shuttered last year after a Baltimore boy died there - has applied for a state license to operate a juvenile program. Rite of Passage has been working for months to open a privately run facility for young offenders - a move that some advocates have said could contradict the state's new approach to treating juvenile delinquents in small residential settings.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | June 25, 2008
The state Department of Juvenile Services is moving to reopen Bowling Brook Preparatory School under new private management, potentially bringing back a Carroll County residence for troubled teenage boys that was closed last year when a youth died while being restrained by staff members. State juvenile service officials are expected today to ask the Board of Public Works in Annapolis to transfer the 16-acre property, which can house up to 173 boys, to a for-profit Nevada company called Rite of Passage.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
The state Department of Juvenile Services announced yesterday that it will close the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center, a privately run 43-bed facility for delinquent boys in Carroll County. Department officials said the center, unlocked but staff-secure, treated about 80 boys per year at an annual cost of more than $3.7 million to the state. Youth advocates have called the center outdated, both in its physical structure and its programming. When the center closes Nov. 30, about 10 boys will be moved to other facilities, and the rest will be released to community programs, said Tammy Brown, a spokeswoman for Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
A celebration of "senior cut day" was interrupted by rangers at Patapsco Valley State Park, who arrested 21 Catonsville High School students yesterday on charges of violating alcohol laws.The tip leading to the arrests came from the school principal, Department of Natural Resources rangers said.Principal Donald I. Mohler III said "cut day" is a rite of passage for graduating seniors across the country."Every year, school administrators negotiate with the seniors on which day they can have an unofficial holiday," Mr. Mohler said yesterday evening.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
With a flick of his wrist, a U.S. Naval Academy baseball player from Orlando, Fla., tossed an upperclassman's hat atop the Herndon Monument on Monday, leading his 2016 classmates to launch into cheers of "Plebes no more!" amid roars from onlookers. "I was considering jumping and making it a little more dramatic," said Patrick Lien - who is a catcher, not pitcher, on the Navy team, "but I didn't want to fall and make a scene. " The Herndon climb was itself a scene: hundreds of plebes, or freshmen, charged a slickened, 21-foot tall granite obelisk at the service academy in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
When they graduated from River Hill High School in 2008, Jonathan Hill , Rajiv Stone and Daniel Thyberg had a grueling summer of physical training awaiting them as they prepared to attend the U.S. Naval Academy together. Four years later, the three friends, all Clarksville natives, are looking forward to graduation and impending commissions as officers. Hill, a history major, will board the USS Ramage, a destroyer based in Norfolk, Va., in June as the ship's auxiliary officer.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
State officials agreed yesterday to allow a private company to open a juvenile facility in Carroll County, a move that troubled advocates and some lawmakers who say the Department of Juvenile Services took a dangerous step backward. Nevada-based Rite of Passage received a license from the department to open a 48-bed program for boys deemed offenders in juvenile court. The facility, called Silver Oak Academy, will be at the site of the former Bowling Brook Preparatory School, which was shuttered two years ago when a boy in custody died.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
The state Department of Juvenile Services announced yesterday that it will close the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center, a privately run 43-bed facility for delinquent boys in Carroll County. Department officials said the center, unlocked but staff-secure, treated about 80 boys per year at an annual cost of more than $3.7 million to the state. Youth advocates have called the center outdated, both in its physical structure and its programming. When the center closes Nov. 30, about 10 boys will be moved to other facilities, and the rest will be released to community programs, said Tammy Brown, a spokeswoman for Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2008
A Nevada company that recently purchased the grounds of the Bowling Brook Preparatory School - a Carroll County youth lockup that was shuttered last year after a Baltimore boy died there - has applied for a state license to operate a juvenile program. Rite of Passage has been working for months to open a privately run facility for young offenders - a move that some advocates have said could contradict the state's new approach to treating juvenile delinquents in small residential settings.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | June 25, 2008
The state Department of Juvenile Services is moving to reopen Bowling Brook Preparatory School under new private management, potentially bringing back a Carroll County residence for troubled teenage boys that was closed last year when a youth died while being restrained by staff members. State juvenile service officials are expected today to ask the Board of Public Works in Annapolis to transfer the 16-acre property, which can house up to 173 boys, to a for-profit Nevada company called Rite of Passage.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 22, 2004
BOSTON -- Let me begin this slowly. The last time I talked about a rite of passage at the Democratic National Convention, one of my neighbors nearly choked: "Right of passage? There is no right of passage. The whole city is going into gridlock!" Such is the mood of Boston. The talk of the town is less about politics than parking. The natives are being wooed north with ads promising "not a delegate in sight." The same City Hall that boosted the convention now has slogans saying: "It's only four days."
NEWS
By MARK GUIDERA | November 24, 1991
A daily ritual that occurs during lunch hour in the cafeteria of Baltimore's harsh inner-city Francis M. Woods experimental school invariably holds James Toney spellbound.As soon as the educator enters the cafeteria, he is surrounded by anxious teens, most of them at the school because they have rock-bottom academic, attendance or behavior histories. As they clamor for the educator's attention, all have a look of high hope in their faces. They ask the same question:Has Mr. Toney found them a placement yet in the school's community-service program?
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun reporter | July 15, 2007
When a grenade came rolling at Rocky Bleier during a fierce enemy assault at the height of the Vietnam War, his football instincts took over. The small explosive "hit my commanding officer right in the back, but it didn't go off on contact; it had a timed fuse," said Bleier, who won four Super Bowl rings as a running back on the Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970s. "And here it comes toward me. "Talk about football reaction," Bleier continued. "It was like the old over-under drill where you roll along the ground and a guy jumps over you. ... So I jump over the grenade.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | September 24, 2006
"Sh'ma Yisrael Adonai Elohaynu Adonai Echad." "Hear, oh Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One." That one sentence is the essential, elemental creed of Judaism. But what God is that? A Christian God? A Jewish God? A Muslim God? A Hindu God? (Although it may be more correct to say, Hindu gods, because Hindus have hundreds of thousands, maybe even several million gods.) I'm certainly not talking about a Buddhist God, as God has no place in Buddhism. Everyone, in every faith, approaches God in his own time and his own fashion.
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