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HEALTH
By Paul Lavin, Ph.D | September 11, 1990
The article entitled "Scientologists triggered Ritalin debate" (8-7-90) contends that the Church of Scientology almost singlehandedly stimulated the Ritalin issue to discredit psychiatry. In fact, there are many professional groups and individual doctors who have been concerned about the over- use of Ritalin long before the Church of Sci-entology entered this debate.For instance, the American Academy of Pediatrics investigated the wide-spread use of Ritalin in the early 1970s. At that time, many respected clinicians charged stimulant medication was being prescribed indiscriminately and stimulants were being used without real justification for prolonged periods of time without adequate supervision.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | August 12, 2006
Checked out Fox SportsNet's Final Score the other night. It's a fast-paced, fairly straightforward presentation of the day's sports news. But could they possibly throw more graphics up on the screen? I felt like I needed Ritalin after just five minutes. And maybe all of the on-screen graphics are just as confusing to the people who work there. During highlights of the Eagles-Browns preseason game, the logos on the screen were for the Phillies and Indians. ray.frager@baltsun.com Read Ray Frager's sports media blog at www.baltimoresun.
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NEWS
By Lauren Rooney | December 1, 1999
RITALIN -- Is it a helping hand for children who can't focus, or a fistful of trouble we feed our children every day? Some parents come close to seeing Ritalin as a catchall solution to a myriad of problems, from attention-deficit disorder and hyperactivity to just plain ornery or aggressive behaviors.There are more than 4 million children in the United States on Ritalin. Many people believe Ritalin is safe and effective, and when parents strictly follow the advice of their physicians and counselors, it usually is. But it has a dark side.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 11, 2005
My 10-year-old granddaughter has ADHD. She has been prescribed Concerta and Ritalin and takes both pills every morning. At a family party, my wife and I noticed that our granddaughter's pants looked three sizes too large. She was constantly pulling them up. I asked my daughter about this. She said the medicines have affected the girl's appetite and are also causing sleeping problems. She just nibbles and picks at her food, so her mother gives her vitamins. She is short for her age and extremely thin.
FEATURES
By Gayle Vassar Melvin and Gayle Vassar Melvin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 4, 1998
For many parents of children with attention deficit disorder, Ritalin is nothing short of a miracle drug. One dose, and their formerly impulsive offspring are able to focus on schoolwork or play peacefully with peers.For manufacturers, Rita-lin's sales figures seem miraculous - up 700 percent since 1991.But a behavioral pediatrician in Walnut Creek, Calif., is sounding a caution: Are children's long-term needs being overlooked in favor of a quick medical fix?That's a question Law-rence Diller explores in the new book "Running on Ritalin: A Physician Reflects on Children, Society, and Performance in a Pill" (Bantam, $25.95)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 10, 1998
As part of a state task force convened to examine the use of the prescription drug Ritalin in schools, a statewide conference will be held Friday and Saturday at the inn and conference center at the University of Maryland, University College, at University Boulevard and Adelphi Road in College Park.Parents, teachers and others concerned about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, as well as the use of medications in schools, are encouraged to attend.The task force was established by the General Assembly to analyze the issue.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | February 20, 2001
PHILADELPHIA --Ritalin is a godsend for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a neurological impairment that derails concentration. But it's not just the class troublemaker or fidgety kid who is taking the drug these days. Ritalin is becoming a popular recreational drug among young people. It's time for the schools to get tougher to help prevent the use of Ritalin for pleasure. Federal officials recently began investigating public schools to address theft, illicit sale, and abuse of ADHD medications.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 8, 1991
CONCORD, N.H. -- A federal judge's ruling that state and local education officials violated a student's rights by insisting he take Ritalin to attend mainstream classes is being hailed by children's rights advocates and civil libertarians as a victory for the educationally handicapped.In a case that has attracted national attention, U.S. District Court Judge Martin F. Loughlin ruled yesterday that the Derry Cooperative School District broke federal laws by barring Casey Jesson, now 12, from regular classrooms unless he took Ritalin against his parents' wishes.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1997
My son's teacher says he can't sit still and pay attention and she wants him on Ritalin. My wife doesn't believe in drugs. I am caught in the middle. What are the pros and cons of Ritalin?Although teachers can spot behavior problems in the classroom, your son needs to be evaluated by an experienced therapist. For some children with attention deficit disorder, Ritalin (methylphenidate) can be helpful. It also may cause stomach aches, reduce appetite and slow growth. Kids sometimes have trouble sleeping, but taking the pill early in the day usually prevents this complication.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Because of a bureaucratic lapse at the Justice Department, thousands of parents around the country are going from pharmacy to pharmacy trying to find supplies of Ritalin, the principal drug used to treat hyperactive children.Supplies of Ritalin, an amphetamine-related drug that is tightly regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration because of its potential for abuse as a stimulant, were disrupted early this fall because the Justice Department inadvertently delayed approving a manufacturer's request to increase its production.
NEWS
By Jamie Talan and Jamie Talan,NEWSDAY | December 17, 2004
Pre-adolescent rats given the popular ADHD drug Ritalin are more likely to show signs of depression in adulthood, according to a Harvard study. The study suggests that stimulants, at least in the normally developing brain, can have unsuspected effects in adulthood. The findings also underscore the importance of an accurate diagnosis for ADHD, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. William Carlezon, director of McLean Hospital's Behavioral Genetics Laboratory and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, presented the findings at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology in Puerto Rico.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | February 23, 2003
Diagnosed with attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder two years ago and worried that the condition was interfering with his work, Kirk Hadsell decided to try something new. He called in a coach. Neither a doctor nor a therapist, Hadsell's coach was more like a personal trainer -- only instead of encouraging him to exercise, she focused mostly on ways to boost his career and, to a lesser extent, improve his personal relationships. They devised a structured plan for him to follow. One year after first meeting his coach, the 52-year-old home inspector says he's doubled the size of his business and has made progress in his personal life.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | February 20, 2001
PHILADELPHIA --Ritalin is a godsend for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a neurological impairment that derails concentration. But it's not just the class troublemaker or fidgety kid who is taking the drug these days. Ritalin is becoming a popular recreational drug among young people. It's time for the schools to get tougher to help prevent the use of Ritalin for pleasure. Federal officials recently began investigating public schools to address theft, illicit sale, and abuse of ADHD medications.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
A new study of Maryland school children shows that whites are up to five times more likely to be using Ritalin, the drug prescribed to control attention deficit disorder, than minorities. Findings also showed that nearly half of Ritalin users are enrolled in special education classes, which include many students with multiple learning problems. The study, published in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics, suggests that Ritalin is being prescribed in a more conservative fashion than has been popularly believed, said Michael Malever, co-author and a researcher at the State Department of Education.
NEWS
May 29, 2000
THERE's a lot of controversy surrounding the use of Ritalin to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders in children. That's why the American Pediatric Association's recent guidelines on diagnosing ADHD are such a needed step in better evaluating school-age children with this problem. ADHD itself is controversial. The diagnosis is derived from observations, not blood or brain-imaging tests. About 2.5 million American kids, mostly boys, have been diagnosed with the disorder -- and many doctors prescribe Ritalin to relieve symptoms that include extreme restlessness, an inability to concentrate, impulsive behavior and difficulty sitting still.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A reaction is under way against drugging children because they are behaving like children, especially boy children. Colorado's elected school board recently voted to discourage what looks like drug abuse in the service of an ideological agenda. The board urged teachers and other school personnel to be more restrained about recommending drugs such as Ritalin for behavior modification of children, and to rely more on discipline and instruction.One reason for the vote is that some school violence has been committed by students taking psychotropic drugs.
NEWS
By Melissa Corley and Melissa Corley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 15, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- Fewer than 3 percent of Maryland's public school children take Ritalin at school for treatment of attention disorders, and the state has one of the lowest rates of use of the drug in the nation, state officials said here yesterday.But that low rate might not be a good thing, the chairman of a task force studying Ritalin use cautioned as its findings were presented at a public conference.The 19-member task force was formed by the Maryland General Assembly in 1997 to study the use of the stimulant Ritalin, or methylphenidate, for the treatment of conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 7, 1995
Q: How come Ritalin is OK for little kids but doctors won't prescribe it for older people? I am in college and really need help staying awake to finish papers and study for exams. You would think I was a criminal the way the doctor reacted when I asked for a prescription.A: Ritalin (methylphenidate) is frequently prescribed to treat attention deficit disorder (ADD). Although it is a stimulant, it enables hyperactive children to calm down and focus more effectively on the task at hand.The enthusiasm with which Ritalin is prescribed for youngsters contrasts with the fear that others may abuse it. Your question highlights the inconsistencies in our drug policies.
NEWS
By Lauren Rooney | December 1, 1999
RITALIN -- Is it a helping hand for children who can't focus, or a fistful of trouble we feed our children every day? Some parents come close to seeing Ritalin as a catchall solution to a myriad of problems, from attention-deficit disorder and hyperactivity to just plain ornery or aggressive behaviors.There are more than 4 million children in the United States on Ritalin. Many people believe Ritalin is safe and effective, and when parents strictly follow the advice of their physicians and counselors, it usually is. But it has a dark side.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 25, 1999
DENVER -- As a debate over the growing use of behavioral drugs for children intensifies across the country, the Colorado Board of Education has passed a resolution meant to discourage teachers from recommending prescription drugs like Ritalin and Luvox for students.The resolution, the first of its kind in the country, carries no legal weight. But it urges teachers and other school personnel to use discipline and instruction to overcome problem behavior in the classroom, rather than to encourage parents to put their children on drugs that are commonly prescribed for attention-deficit and hyperactive disorders.
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