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By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Even though mushrooms are available year-round, I tend to crave them most in the fall. The look, feel, smell and flavor of mushrooms evoke chilly September walks through dusky forest trails. Purveyors at area farmers' markets often sell these foraged fungi in small baskets featuring one specific style of mushroom such as a morel of a lobster mushroom, but they also offer variety baskets; that's what this recipe is based on. These baskets typically contain three to four types of mushrooms and are a steal at around $12. For this recipe, I wanted to showcase how hearty and comforting a mushroom dish could be using minimum ingredients.
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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Cafe Gia has started a new Wednesday evening dining promotion. The Little Italy restaurant is offering a rotating selection of full-portioned pastas, pizza and risotto dishes for $10. Wednesdays at Gia will go on hiatus for Restaurant Week, resuming on Feb. 6. But it will be up and running this Wednesday with a menu that includes linguine carbonara, penne with radicchio and speck in a creamy pink sauce, risotto with Gorgonzola and walnuts and...
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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | May 5, 2004
Barley may be best known as an ingredient for soups and stews, but this wholesome grain can adapt to warm-weather dishes as well. Here's a barley risotto recipe from the National Barley Foods Council that is a twist on the traditional Italian favorite and makes a great entree for a spring dinner party. Place 1 pound of asparagus on a cookie sheet and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of olive oil, rolling spears to coat. Roast in a 400-degree oven for 8 minutes; set aside. In a medium-heavy pan, heat 3 teaspoons of olive oil over medium-high heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Even though mushrooms are available year-round, I tend to crave them most in the fall. The look, feel, smell and flavor of mushrooms evoke chilly September walks through dusky forest trails. Purveyors at area farmers' markets often sell these foraged fungi in small baskets featuring one specific style of mushroom such as a morel of a lobster mushroom, but they also offer variety baskets; that's what this recipe is based on. These baskets typically contain three to four types of mushrooms and are a steal at around $12. For this recipe, I wanted to showcase how hearty and comforting a mushroom dish could be using minimum ingredients.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | November 18, 1992
If you have ever had the opportunity to consume that lovely Italian dish called risotto, you've probably been tempted to try the creamy rice concoction in your own kitchen. This would not be without effort and some expense, for aborio, the only type of rice used in risotto is quite costly.Before you pass up this recipe, rest assured that this is a speedy and more economical version of that luxurious classic. You possibly would turn up your nose at the addition of frozen cooked winter squash but this is a key ingredient for it adds a fulfilling creaminess to the rice that mimics the cream and cheese in risotto.
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By Maria Hiaasen | March 11, 1998
* Item: Alessi Risotto* WHat you get: 4 servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: About 25 minutes on stove top* Review: You can't get this imported risotto just anywhere (Eddie's of Roland Park and Graul's Market carry it), but it's worth a special trip. Inside the unassuming, foil-lined, brown paper pouch is a rich arborio rice mix that cooks easily and tastes fresh. We sampled the risotto con funghi porcini and were treated to a creamy short-grain rice dotted with slivers of porcini mushrooms.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX and CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 7, 2006
Risotto, so prized for its creamy, flavorful grains of rice, is not the dish for quick weeknight meals. It requires a slow simmer and a hovering hand on a Sunday afternoon. But if you have a taste for such a dish and it's only Tuesday, substitute with a pilaflike mixture that comes close to the Italian classic. Pilaf is normally made with long-grain or basmati rice. Here, we've substituted with short-grain rice to mimic the look of risotto. After a quick saute so the grains absorb the butter-shallot flavors, we add wine and chicken broth and cover the dish to cook until tender.
FEATURES
By Mollie Katzen and Mollie Katzen,Tribune Media Services | October 20, 2007
The more colorful the foliage and the nippier the air, the heartier-yet-simpler our suppers can be. Here's a great recipe for expressing that autumn spirit - a rich, earthy risotto laced with the pleasantly bitter edge of radicchio, deepened by the mysterious flavor of porcini mushrooms, bound together in a lush, soothing backdrop of the traditional creamy rice. The charm of any risotto is the contrast between the separate, al dente grains and the thick, smooth sauce in which they are suspended.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
The magic that is risotto, a creamy and flavorful rice concoction from Italy, begins with a simple "noce de burro" -- a "walnut" of butter.Chef and restaurateur Gino Giolitti uses a huge metal spoon to scoop the butter from its container and into the heavy aluminum skillet."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 17, 2000
The restaurant business must get in your blood. That's the only reason I can imagine that Mark Velleggia, son of one of the owners of Velleggia's in Little Italy, would open his own place, 2 North George -- so called because it's two blocks north of the Washington Monument on North Charles Street. He must know what a thankless job it is to own a restaurant, to have your original chef leave (Paul Resko, who developed the menu, has moved on) and then to have a restaurant critic come in and make carping comments about your life's dream.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 14, 2008
Panini Express 70 Delicious Recipes Hot Off the Press Massimo's Italian Kitchen Authentic One-Dish Meals From a Seasoned Chef By Massimo Capra Sellers Publishing / 2007 / $22.95 Both Maxine Clark and Food Network chef Massimo Capra highlight oodles of inventive risotto dishes in their tomes. Capra's Risotto With White Asparagus, Black Pepper and Wild Strawberries and the one with shrimp scampi and zucchini look delicious. The Red-Beet Risotto I made was vivid in color but tasted bland.
NEWS
By Erin Mendell and Erin Mendell,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food By Mark Bittman Wiley / 2007 / $35 With How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, New York Times columnist Mark Bittman follows up on his book How to Cook Everything with another user-friendly and comprehensive cookbook, this time without meat. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian offers lessons and tips that both the kitchen novice and the experienced cook can learn from. Some of Bittman's recipes, especially a pasta dish prepared like risotto, already have become favorites of mine.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom | November 11, 2007
Although I adore risotto, I rarely make it for company as it requires a good deal of cooking at the last minute. I have on occasion prepared it in advance, using various techniques, but at heart I am a fan of making this glorious Italian specialty and eating it soon afterward. Imagine my surprise when I stumbled across a recipe for baked risotto. The directions called for spreading Arborio rice in a buttered baking dish, covering the grains with hot, simmering stock and melted butter, then placing the pan in the oven until all the liquids were absorbed by the rice.
FEATURES
By Mollie Katzen and Mollie Katzen,Tribune Media Services | October 20, 2007
The more colorful the foliage and the nippier the air, the heartier-yet-simpler our suppers can be. Here's a great recipe for expressing that autumn spirit - a rich, earthy risotto laced with the pleasantly bitter edge of radicchio, deepened by the mysterious flavor of porcini mushrooms, bound together in a lush, soothing backdrop of the traditional creamy rice. The charm of any risotto is the contrast between the separate, al dente grains and the thick, smooth sauce in which they are suspended.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | July 1, 2007
For those who go out to eat and have trouble deciding what to order, the 15th annual Culinary Extravaganza was the perfect solution. Some 30 chefs offered all sorts of specialties at this fundraiser for Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland. And several hundred people took full advantage, going from food station to food station as they strolled a ballroom in the Marriott Waterfront Hotel. "This is a wonderful thing to do. There's everything from lobster bisque to sushi," said Henry A. Rosenberg Jr. He and his wife, Dot, co-chaired the party, playing host to guests including Ken and Diane Trout, Leroy Merritt, George and Jennifer Reynolds, Rita St. Clair, Carole and Bean Sibel and Stanley and Celia Levinson.
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,NEWSDAY | October 29, 2006
This sweet and savory risotto is not difficult to make, but does take about 30 minutes of fairly constant attention. Add a salad to make it a meal. To peel any of the smooth-skinned winter squash such as butternut, use a vegetable peeler. Acorn squash, full of ridges that make peeling trickier, is more easily prepared by cooking it right in the skin. Most winter squash can be kept for several months in a cool dry place. Marge Perry writes for Newsday, which provided the recipe analysis.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | October 20, 1999
Rice mixes draw mixed reaction* Item: Betty Crocker rice mixes* What you get: About 2 1/2 servings* Cost: About $1.60* Preparation time: 20 to 25 minutes stove top, 25 to 30 minutes microwave* Review: Betty Crocker's newest rice mixes are a mixed bag. On the plus side, they contain no artificial flavors or preservatives. On the minus side, microwave cooking times appear to vary from the instructions, and, across the board, the flavors aren't consistent. The Garden Vegetable Pilaf was fresh and fluffy, but the Cheddar and Broccoli was a bit bland.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Cafe Gia has started a new Wednesday evening dining promotion. The Little Italy restaurant is offering a rotating selection of full-portioned pastas, pizza and risotto dishes for $10. Wednesdays at Gia will go on hiatus for Restaurant Week, resuming on Feb. 6. But it will be up and running this Wednesday with a menu that includes linguine carbonara, penne with radicchio and speck in a creamy pink sauce, risotto with Gorgonzola and walnuts and...
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX and CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 7, 2006
Risotto, so prized for its creamy, flavorful grains of rice, is not the dish for quick weeknight meals. It requires a slow simmer and a hovering hand on a Sunday afternoon. But if you have a taste for such a dish and it's only Tuesday, substitute with a pilaflike mixture that comes close to the Italian classic. Pilaf is normally made with long-grain or basmati rice. Here, we've substituted with short-grain rice to mimic the look of risotto. After a quick saute so the grains absorb the butter-shallot flavors, we add wine and chicken broth and cover the dish to cook until tender.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 13, 2005
Recently I was very fortunate to dine at a fabulous restaurant. While I was there, the chef prepared a mushroom risotto that was to die for. I must have that recipe (or at least something comparable)! Let's take a look at what makes a risotto great. First, you have to have the correct rice -- Italian arborio. You can make risotto out of other types of rice; you can even make a risotto type of dish from barley. But arborio rice makes it the best. The next critical ingredient is the cheese -- it must be real Parmigiano-Reggiano, not something that comes out of a can. When it comes to cooking risotto, remember a couple of things.
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