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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
The key to breast cancer might lie in 50,000 sisters. In the largest-ever study of its kind, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is enrolling that many sisters of women with breast cancer in an effort to identify potential environmental and genetic risk factors for the disease. Past research has identified other factors that increase the risk, including race and age, bearing a child relatively late in life or having no children, physical inactivity, and obesity after menopause.
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BUSINESS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Skateboarding apparel store Zumiez included "mall violence" in its annual report of business risks released Tuesday, after a January shooting at The Mall in Columbia left two employees dead. "Most of our stores are located in shopping malls," the Washington state-based company wrote. "Any threat of terrorist attacks or actual terrorist events, or other types of mall violence, such as shootings in malls, particularly in public areas, could lead to lower customer traffic in shopping malls.
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NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Doctors following Ariel Sharon's condition from afar say his chances for recovery are probably slim, given his age and the fact that he required two brain operations after suffering a major hemorrhage Wednesday. Many patients with his risk factors either die or have trouble walking, standing and talking again - let alone summoning the mental and physical faculties needed to run a nation, experts say. "In general terms, you're so much better off if you have this problem when you're young," said Dr. E. Francois Aldrich, a neurosurgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
A new report suggests that a substantial number of U.S. nuclear reactors — including one or both at Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland — are at risk of early retirement. Mark Cooper with the Vermont Law School's Institute for Energy and the Environment said a third of the country's nuclear fleet have a number of risk factors, largely economic, that could lead to their owners' deciding to shut them down before their licenses expire. A single problem, such as a costly repair, could be enough to push any of the reactors over the brink, he said.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2007
The standard treatment for prostate cancer - shutting off the body's production of androgen hormones - can chop 2 1/2 years off the lives of men who are at high risk of developing heart disease, Boston researchers reported yesterday. The drugs used for suppressing the hormones produce anemia, weight gain and insulin resistance, a group of factors known as metabolic syndrome. These effects can sharply increase the risk of a fatal heart attack, especially in men who are at high risk, Dr. Anthony D'Amico of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 31, 2012
Crashes of military vehicles account for nearly one-third of annual soldier fatalities  and are among the top five causes of hospitalization, according to new Hopkins research. Researchers with the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy examined the risk factors for injuries to U.S. soldiers  from crashes of Humvees and founded the greatest risk of danger came to the driver or gunner of the vehicle. The study, published in the August issue of the journal Military Medicine, was the the first published analysis of the risk deployed soldiers face in Humvees.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
In its zeal to fight cancer, Maryland may be failing to combat two other diseases that, together with cancer, account for the majority of all deaths in the state, a research team contends.Dr. Stephen Havas, an epidemiologist with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said in a 15-page report that heart disease, cancer and stroke together account for 60 percent of the state's deaths -- with heart disease far outstripping cancer as the leading killer."Deaths from these three diseases are occurring at a higher rate in Maryland than elsewhere in the United States," Dr. Havas said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
In its zeal to fight cancer, Maryland may be failing to combat two other diseases that, together with cancer, account for the majority of all deaths in the state, a research team contends.Dr. Stephen Havas, an epidemiologist with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said in a 15-page report that heart disease, cancer and stroke together account for 60 percent of the state's deaths -- with heart disease far outstripping cancer as the leading killer."Deaths from these three diseases are occurring at a higher rate in Maryland than elsewhere in the United States," Dr. Havas said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | April 27, 2009
More than 140,000 people in the U.S. die each year from stroke, making it the country's second leading cause of death for women, and the third for men. About 795,000 strokes occur each year. At least one-quarter occur in people younger than 65 years, making it a health subject important to all age groups. Dr. Marian LaMonte, neurology chief at St. Agnes Hospital, presents a free talk on strokes at 6 p.m. May 12 at the hospital. She offers these tips: 1 Know the warning signs of stroke.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2006
One in four cases of breast cancer in post-menopausal women who have not used hormone replacement therapy is caused by weight gain, but the risk can be substantially lowered by losing weight, researchers reported today. Researchers found that if the women lost at least 22 pounds, they could reduce their risk of breast cancer by about 40 percent. If they kept the weight off for at least four years, the risk was reduced by 60 percent. "Weight is one of the few risk factors for breast cancer women can do something about," said lead author A. Heather Eliassen, an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 31, 2012
Crashes of military vehicles account for nearly one-third of annual soldier fatalities  and are among the top five causes of hospitalization, according to new Hopkins research. Researchers with the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy examined the risk factors for injuries to U.S. soldiers  from crashes of Humvees and founded the greatest risk of danger came to the driver or gunner of the vehicle. The study, published in the August issue of the journal Military Medicine, was the the first published analysis of the risk deployed soldiers face in Humvees.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
An aortic aneurysm can burst and kill within minutes, but a simple test – an ultrasound like the kind that detects a baby's heart beat – can spot a bulge in the aortic wall and surgery can repair it. Blockages in the carotid arteries that run up both sides of the neck and into the brain can cause a major stroke. Yet that same ultrasound wand can spot a blockage and that, too, can be remedied. Dare to CARE is a program started by Annapolis vascular surgeon Dr. John Martin, and he has screened – for free – more than 30,000 people since 2000, half of whom were found to have some vascular disease.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
The new year brings a lot of resolutions to exercise. And sometimes the cold weather also means more snow shoveling. All that exertion can be harmful to people with abnormal hearts by leading to sudden cardiac arrest. Dr. Gordon Tomaselli, director of cardiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, talks about the difference between sudden cardiac arrest and a heart attack and what those at risk can do. Question: What is sudden cardiac arrest? Answer: Sudden cardiac arrest refers to collapse and loss of consciousness due to a dramatic fall in blood pressure.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Myra Roseman, a retired bacteriologist and research associate with the department of epidemiology at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, died Nov. 21 from complications of dementia at the North Oaks retirement community. She was 88. Myra Goldenberg, the daughter of an engineer and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating from Western High School in 1937, she was 19 when she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry and bacteriology from Goucher College.
NEWS
By Ashley Halsey III and Ashley Halsey III,The Washington Post | October 14, 2009
A head-on collision is the stuff of nightmares, and everyone worries about "that idiot" in the next lane who seems sure to cause an accident. But when people die on the region's highways, most often it's in a single-vehicle crash. Of the 7,945 people who died in the past five years in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia, 58.9 percent were in single-vehicle crashes. "We are seeing a troubling trend: an epidemic of single-vehicle crashes ... on area roads," said John B. Townsend II, a spokesman for AAA Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | April 27, 2009
More than 140,000 people in the U.S. die each year from stroke, making it the country's second leading cause of death for women, and the third for men. About 795,000 strokes occur each year. At least one-quarter occur in people younger than 65 years, making it a health subject important to all age groups. Dr. Marian LaMonte, neurology chief at St. Agnes Hospital, presents a free talk on strokes at 6 p.m. May 12 at the hospital. She offers these tips: 1 Know the warning signs of stroke.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | August 10, 2005
Women who gained more than 24 pounds after age 50 increased their risk of postmenopausal breast cancer by 62 percent compared with women whose weight was stable, regardless of baseline weight, according to a study from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. Women who had gained more than 33 pounds since age 20 were similarly at a 60 percent increased risk for postmenopausal disease, but it was the extra pounds put on after 50 that appeared to play a more significant role, study author Marilie D. Gammon said.
NEWS
By Ashley Halsey III and Ashley Halsey III,The Washington Post | October 14, 2009
A head-on collision is the stuff of nightmares, and everyone worries about "that idiot" in the next lane who seems sure to cause an accident. But when people die on the region's highways, most often it's in a single-vehicle crash. Of the 7,945 people who died in the past five years in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia, 58.9 percent were in single-vehicle crashes. "We are seeing a troubling trend: an epidemic of single-vehicle crashes ... on area roads," said John B. Townsend II, a spokesman for AAA Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,Chicago Tribune | September 15, 2008
CHICAGO - In the high-profile world of breast cancer advocacy, women with a hereditary predisposition to the disease often feel overlooked. That's why it meant so much when actress Christina Applegate acknowledged last month that she has a genetic mutation known as BRCA1 linked to breast and ovarian cancer. Applegate, 36, went further, disclosing that she had had both breasts surgically removed. The actress' mother has battled cancer twice and "I just wanted to kind of be rid of it," she said on Good Morning America.
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