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Rising Rates

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BUSINESS
By Dian Hymer | July 3, 1994
As interest rates rise, some homebuyers are debating whether to buy now or wait for rates to come down. Others are racing to buy before rates climb further.Interest rates on fixed-rate mortgages have increased over 1.5 percentage point in the past few months. As rates go up, so does the cost of a house. Buyers who don't have the ability to pay more have several options. They can scale down and buy a less expensive house. They can switch from fixed-rate to adjustable-rate financing, which makes qualifying easier.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 21, 2014
According to a report released earlier this month in the widely respected health research journal The Lancet, the United States now ranks 60th out of 180 countries on maternal deaths occurring during pregnancy and childbirth. To put it bluntly, for every 100,000 births in America last year, 18.5 women died. That's compared to 8.2 women who died during pregnancy and birth in Canada, 6.1 in Britain, and only 2.4 in Iceland. A woman giving birth in America is more than twice as likely to die as a woman in Saudi Arabia or China.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan will deliver his semiannual report on interest rates to a congressional panel today against a backdrop of pressure from financial markets for a second increase, a move the Fed is believed to be trying to avoid for now.The pressure from bond traders, who are steadily pushing up long-term interest rates, is only one reason why Mr. Greenspan's testimony could scarcely come at a more awkward time for the...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
First Mariner Bancorp on Friday reported a $7.4 million loss in the third quarter, which the Baltimore-based company blamed on a steep increase on interest rates that dampened its mortgage business. The loss amounts to 38 cents per share, compared with a profit of $7.9 million, or 42 cents per share, for the quarter a year earlier. CEO Mark A. Keidel said the third-quarter results were affected by the "rapid and steep increase" in long-term Treasury rates. "Like most in the residential mortgage industry, we experienced declines in production and a significant compression of the margins on sold loans," Keidel said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 25, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks plummeted yesterday as concerns about rising interest rates were compounded by the collapse of Tele-Communications Inc.'s merger with Bell Atlantic Corp.Questions about the direction of rates grew after a report showed durable-goods orders last month were stronger than expected, fueling inflation concern, analysts said."Nervousness about interest rates and the breakdown of the TCI-Bell merger spooked investors," said Porter H. Sutro, director of equity management at Axe-Houghton Management, Rye Brook, N.Y.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 51.78, to 3,839.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Adjustable rate mortgages have always meant that homeowners are taking a chance that payments could fluctuate along with interest rates, but in recent years some loans have been structured to virtually guarantee that rates go up - and stay up. While many homeowners are feeling the pinch of rates resetting on so-called ARMs, some are getting crushed by what housing advocates call "strangulation ARMs" that continue to reset as often as every six months....
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | September 26, 2004
YOU WON'T GET a toaster, but you might get a free lunch. Banks and savings and loan associations, which many years ago gave away small appliances to attract retail deposits, are promoting savings again. Savers who rediscover banks and thrifts stand to win the trifecta: competitive interest rates at traditional banks and thrifts and at online banks; an opportunity to capture higher rates as they occur; and government insurance of their accounts up to $100,000 through the FDIC. "Unlike the rest of the investment world, you don't have to take additional risk in order to earn additional return by finding higher-yielding CDs," said Greg McBride, senior financial analyst at Bankrate.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | August 14, 2005
IF THE FEDERAL Reserve were any clearer, there would be a billboard posted in Times Square: "Interest rates will increase!" After a year of boosting bank lending rates to pre-empt inflation, the Fed is not finished. The rule of thumb for investors says higher rates mean lower prices for stocks and bonds. When money costs more, it's harder for business profits to exceed the cost of money. Fixed-income investments you hold become less valuable in competition with higher interest rates paid by newly issued fixed-income securities.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
As Skip and Michelle Campion made plans for a bigger family and a move from their cramped, split-foyer in Catonsville late last year, they found interest rates on their side.With rates below 8 percent, the couple, who'd owned their first home five years, could afford to spread out in a four-bedroom Colonial in Eldersburg, with a two-car garage, a basement and enough space for their 2-year-old son and a second child.Jeffrey L. Underwood, the buyer's broker who represented the couple, says he's started to see more clients like the Campions, owners of first homes who are ready for a larger home and canstill afford to buy even as rates have creeped up from 25-year lows.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 24, 2003
Homebuilders expressed heightened confidence in their industry last week and refinancing activity continued to fall as buyers grappled with rising interest rates. U.S. homebuilder optimism rose to the highest level in more than 3 1/2 years, the National Association of Home Builders said, pointing to its housing market index that gauges builder sentiment. The figure jumped to 71 in August, the highest since January 2000. The Washington-based group's index has risen for four consecutive months, the longest string of increases since 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
You know what, maybe there is some justice in this world. I was angry Monday when I saw David Axelrod, the latest Obama partisan hired by MSNBC, dare to take on Bob Schieffer, of CBS News. At issue was a statement Schieffer made on his "Face the Nation" show Sunday in which he questioned not only Team Obama's lack of respect for the press and First Amendment, but the overall communications competence of the administration. You can see it here . Schieffer is right, of course.
NEWS
May 9, 2011
The article "Planned C-sections satisfying to moms" (May 8) claims that the rising cesarean rate reflects women's voices being respected by doctors. The research does not back up this claim. The GBMC/Bayview study looked at maternal satisfaction after planned cesareans and planned vaginal births (whether ending in a vaginal or cesarean delivery). The lowest levels of satisfaction were from moms who had an unplanned cesarean. Unplanned cesareans accounted for 30 percent of the planned vaginal births (48 out of 160)
BUSINESS
By Kevin G. Hall and Kevin G. Hall,McClatchy-Tribune | June 11, 2008
WASHINGTON - As gasoline prices soar to new records, America's president - and the two men who hope to succeed him - are offering only partial or long-term solutions and ignoring three steps that many experts say could bring some relief now. Americans began this workweek by crossing a dismal threshold, paying a once-unthinkable nationwide record average of $4.02 per gallon for unleaded gasoline and the prospect of even higher prices in months ahead....
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
Maryland residents face the prospect of power shortages and higher electricity rates unless the state moves to reimpose some regulation on the industry, members of the state Public Service Commission concluded in a preliminary report to lawmakers yesterday. The report is critical of the competitive power market, concluding that unregulated electricity suppliers can't be relied on to deliver low-cost electricity or to build enough power plants to ensure that the lights stay on. But the commission said that full re-regulation of the power industry would be too expensive and impractical.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2007
I never thought I'd be a greenie," said retired Army Maj. Harold Bower. But this year, he shelled out about $31,000 -- before government incentives -- for two solar energy systems at his all-electric four-bedroom home in Severn. One provides all the hot water. The other, about 30 percent of the household electricity. He thinks of himself more as an investor in technology that allows him to gloat now about having electric bills no larger than those he had before the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. rate increase.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Adjustable rate mortgages have always meant that homeowners are taking a chance that payments could fluctuate along with interest rates, but in recent years some loans have been structured to virtually guarantee that rates go up - and stay up. While many homeowners are feeling the pinch of rates resetting on so-called ARMs, some are getting crushed by what housing advocates call "strangulation ARMs" that continue to reset as often as every six months....
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 13, 1998
SHOULD WARNINGS of an interest rate boost frighten long-term investors into unloading their stocks? No.Despite the booming economy -- unemployment at the lowest in 28 years, auto sales robust and leading indicators pointing up -- serious inflation signs are nonexistent. This has prompted many to conclude that the Federal Reserve will not increase rates when its Open Market Committee meets Tuesday.As one local broker quipped, "Why would the Fed take away the punch bowl just when the party's going strong?"
BUSINESS
By San Antonio Express-News | August 3, 2003
The expected rise in mortgage rates during the next few years will dampen home sales and new mortgages, but not enough to reduce real estate values, according to a recent forecast by the Mortgage Bankers Association of America. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage will end this year with an average of 5.7 percent, average 6.1 percent in 2004, and finish 2005 at 6.7 percent, according to the trade group's latest forecast. Thirty-year rates rose to 6.14 percent last week, the sixth straight weekly increase and the highest this year.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
In this topsy-turvy lending environment, Wall Street is suddenly lumping purchasers of expensive homes together with low-income, shaky-credit homebuyers as risks to avoid. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the large government-backed companies that purchase mortgages, don't buy so-called "jumbo" loans above $417,000. That wasn't a problem in the past, but now investors spooked by turmoil in the lending industry have decided that they don't want to buy jumbo loans either. The result? Just ask Barry R. Glazer.
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