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NEWS
November 21, 2004
On November 20, 2004, JAMES W. RIPPLE; beloved husband of Christine (nee Wilson); devoted father of Michael Ripple, Neil Ripple and his wife Sebrina and Patrick Ripple; loving son of Marie Ripple; dear grandfather of Kayla, Evan, Olivia and Mason Ripple; dear brother of Dave, Barry Ripple and Judy Krause. James will be greatly missed. Friends may call at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services Monday 7:30 P.M. Interment private.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Tammy Woodard lost pay and paid time off last year to federal budget tightening, which meant she had to tighten her family's budget — and continues to do so now in fear of future cuts. For the Aberdeen Proving Ground employee, it is a personal hit. But her situation is so common that it's a statewide issue, too. Maryland's personal income growth was among the lowest nationwide last year as federal budget cuts rippled through the region, affecting Virginia and the District of Columbia as well, the U.S. Department of Commerce estimated last week.
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NEWS
November 6, 2005
On Thursday, November 3, 2005, DOROTHY MAE RIPPLE, of Gaithersburg, MD, formerly of Catonsville, MD; loving aunt of Jean Dorothy Humphries and Nancy Ripple-Fredrick; sister of the late Norma, Everett and Walter Ripple. Services and interment private. Arrangements by Devol Funeral Home, Gaithersburg, MD.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Matt Kumpar paid $622 for the electricity his auto shop used in January, so he thought the February charge - a whopping $3,192 - was a mistake. It wasn't. The rate for his electric supply skyrocketed, a shift his provider blamed on abnormally low temperatures brought on by the polar vortex. "I was absolutely blown out of my socks," said Kumpar, owner of the Baltimore Collision Center in Remington. The frigid winter caused all sorts of energy market disruptions. Demand spiked.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2005
PARK CITY, Utah -- The applause rippled through the Library Center Theatre after Doug Sadler's Swimmers premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Where its echoes spread will decide the movie's fate. "This will launch Doug Sadler," co-producer David Leitner said. But blast-off is no guarantee for the Easton-based Sadler, a writer-director who overcame many obstacles simply to bring Swimmers to fruition. The festival placed his underdog project in a category, American Spectrum, that receives less exposure than the dramatic competition.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
Tyrone Lewis had two passions - being a cook and drugs. Hooked on heroin for 15 years, the Baltimore native traces the start of his addiction to a shot of hard liquor given to him when he was 7 by his grandfather. He managed to get and keep - at least for a while - a series of cooking jobs. But he readily admits that "drugs always came first." Now 45, Mr. Lewis has been clean for four years and serves as the kitchen manager for the Dogwood Restaurant in Hampden. He is also the lead apprentice for Chefs in the Making, a culinary training program for recovering addicts, ex-offenders and the homeless started by Dogwood co-owners Galen and Bridget Sampson.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn and Laura Smitherman and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporters | August 17, 2007
Ace Hardware and Hearth in Glen Burnie was doing a brisk business in high-end barbecues and hot tubs in the midst of the real estate boom. Now Pete Peterson, an owner of the store, is having trouble selling luxury items for the home as consumer budgets are squeezed. "When the value of homes went up quickly, people were able to take the money they didn't work for and spend it on things they wanted," Peterson said, referring to soaring home prices that made people feel richer and allowed some to cash out equity.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and William Patalon III and Bill Atkinson and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
A year ago, there weren't enough technicians to maintain corporate computer networks, staff the counters at neighborhood fast-food restaurants or assemble telecommunications gear on the factory floor."
NEWS
March 14, 1991
These obituaries were provided by area funeral homes. If informationhasn't been published about someone in your family who has passed away, please call Deborah Toich at 761-1732 or 332-6211 or (800) 829-8000, Ext. 6211. You may also fax your information to us at 332-6677.IDA M. RIPPLEHomemaker, 90Funeral services will take place for Glen Burnieresident Ida M. Ripple at 1 p.m. today at Kirkley Funeral Home.Mrs. Ripple, 90, died of heart failure March 11 at Meridian Nursing Home.A lifetime county resident, she was a homemaker, a member of Glen Burnie United Methodist Church and a former member of Burwood Senior Center.
NEWS
November 25, 2003
On November 23, 2003, BERNARD GREEN; beloved husband of the late Gloria Green (nee Matcher); loving father of Donald S. Tucciarella, Carmela T. Ripple and the late Vincent J. Tucciarella; devoted father-in-law of Michael Ripple and Brenda Tucciarella. Also survived by eight loving grandchildren. Services and Interment in the Hebrew Orthodox Memorial Cemetery, 6820 German Hill Road, on Tuesday, November 25 at 10 A.M. Please omit flowers. Arrangements by Sol Levinson and Bros., Inc.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
A Bel Air company that handled payrolls for many employers in the area is being sued by clients for allegedly stealing years of tax payments rather than sending them on to the tax collectors as required — leaving the companies on the hook. Plaintiffs include DuClaw Brewing Co. and Animal Emergency Hospital, both of Harford County, which are each claiming losses of tens of thousands of dollars in separate lawsuits against payroll firm AccuPay. Stuart Levine, a Towson attorney who represents other businesses that used AccuPay, said he believes the payroll company had as many as 600 clients, most of them in Harford.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Looming federal budget cuts make a whole lot of Marylanders nervous because a whole lot of Maryland depends on Uncle Sam for a paycheck - directly or indirectly. More than 300,000 Maryland residents work for the federal government, according to the state Department of Business and Economic Development. That's one in every 10 employed adults in the state. And that's just the start. Maryland is one of the nation's top recipients of federal spending on goods and services. Those billions of dollars supported about 230,000 jobs here at federal contractors and subcontractors in 2010, the state economic development agency estimated.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Debbie Hurd sees it in the parking lots along North Point Boulevard — the answer to what life would be like if the steel mill that fueled the tight-knit communities near Sparrows Point never reopens. Fewer cars. Fewer customers for businesses. She gestured in her family's empty bar, Pop's Tavern, and said the days of steelworkers lined up for a drink are long gone. "Everything I see on this boulevard is really, really hurting," Hurd said. "I've told some of my employees, 'Don't get mad at me if I have to let you go.' " No big employer goes down without setting off ripples in the local economy.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Kathie Jones loses more than patience when the mail is late. She also loses customers. As the owner of a small business that prepares bulk mail for delivery by the U.S. Postal Service, Jones hears complaints every time a church newsletter or a political ad she sends arrives late — even if the delays are not her fault. If mail is lost, she has to start projects over, sometimes eating the cost. So Jones is understandably wary about a Postal Service proposal to close the last mail-sorting hub on the Eastern Shore, located a few hundred feet from the Easton Municipal Airport.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The restaurants around Fort Monmouth in New Jersey used to be packed. Now that lunchtime crowd gathers 150 miles to the southwest, in Aberdeen. Javier Rodriguez, who just relocated to Aberdeen Proving Ground last month, was struck by the familiar feeling the mass migration has created in his still-unfamiliar new home. "I went out to lunch with a couple of my co-workers … and it was exactly how I remembered it when I first started at Fort Monmouth," said Rodriguez, 33. The national reshuffling of military bases that has brought thousands of jobs to Maryland hits a key milestone this week: It's officially done.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 10, 2011
It is a great notion - cleaning up the rivers that flow through the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin. Ambitious volunteers, led by a schoolteacher named Brian Schilpp, already have pulled tons of trash and tires out of Back River, long used as a dumping ground for people on the southeast side of the city and Baltimore County. And now, on the other side of town, we'll soon see a new effort to turn the polluted, heavy-metal Patapsco into a clean and swimmable waterway, from its headwaters to the Baltimore harbor.
NEWS
October 10, 1995
In yesterday's editions, a photo caption about the Children Around the Globe Sign Language Group's appearance at Oriole Park at Camden Yards incorrectly identified Tori Ripple as Casey Shellenberger. Shown here is a picture of Casey.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By These obituaries were provided by area funeral homes. Ifinformation hasn't been published about someone in your familywho has passed away, please call Deborah Toich at 761-1732 or 332-6211 or (800) 829-8000, Ext. 6211; you may also fax your information to us at 332-6677 | May 9, 1991
Services took place for Cape St. Claire resident Paula Kaye Ballweg on May 8 at St. George and St. Mathews Episcopal Church in Dundalk.Mrs. Ballweg, 42, died of cancer May 5 at her home.A 1966 graduate of Dundalk High School, she was a resident of Cape St. Claire for the past five years.She was employed as chief billing clerk at ITO Corp., Dundalk Marine Terminal. One of the first women to join International Longshoreman's Association Local 953, she was chief billing clerk at the new Seagirt Terminal.
SPORTS
Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
Dave Rather can't help but fret that his patio will be empty come the second Sunday in September. The day should be one of the most festive and lucrative of the year at Mother's Federal Hill Grille, a time for eight months of anticipation to pay off in a purple-tinged celebration of beer, cheer and most importantly, football. But now that the NFL players union has decertified and the owners have locked the players out, Rather — like millions of fans and interested business owners nationwide — is contemplating a fall without football.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2010
The national wave for Republicans turned into a mere ripple by the time it reached the races for the Maryland General Assembly on Tuesday, as most Democrats perceived as vulnerable defeated their challengers. Democratic House Speaker Michael E. Busch, openly targeted for defeat by Republican gubernatorial candidate Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., won re-election in his three-member Annapolis district. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., whom Ehrlich had said Republicans would "medicate" in order to get along with him better, coasted to re-election in Prince George's and Calvert counties.
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